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    (Original post by Observatory)
    If you have an A* in mathematics A level then I wouldn't think twice about B in physics GCSE. But my reading of your OP led me to believe you don't have any A levels.

    By all means try to get an A* in A level mathematics and physics - this risks very little money and relatively little time - but if it doesn't work out, and don't be totally surprised if it doesn't, it might not be the best idea to pursue it to the end of the earth.

    btw, for interest, and because it's not made clear even to those much later in the process than you, getting a job in physics requires going through a series of filters roughly as follows:

    - At the top universities, about 50% want to do a PhD, and about 25% are able to. All of these students have AAA+ at A level, most first time, many with only A*s in any maths and science related subjects. I don't know how it is at lower ranked universities.

    - Of those 25%, about 25% continue to become post-docs. A post-doc is a limited, usually two or three year contract. The rest leave physics.

    - After at least two post-docs, you may receive a permanent job. About 25% of those who go on to be post-docs succeed getting a permanent job.

    So from an initial population of students with all top grades in mathematical subjects who want to be physicists, the "survival rate" to being able to do physics as a profession is about 3%, excluding those who chose to do other things after the bachelor's degree.
    Physics is a passion of mine, which is why that is the degree I would pursue. I dream of going on to a doctorate or at least an MPhys, and then working in the field for my career. But I don't like being stuck in a dead end sales exec role like I am now, so if I get a degree but am not able to go on to a career in Physics, then at least I have studied what I wanted to study but still benefit from it in a business focused career, which is where a lot of science students end up obviously
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    (Original post by BradPennick)
    Physics is a passion of mine, which is why that is the degree I would pursue. I dream of going on to a doctorate or at least an MPhys, and then working in the field for my career. But I don't like being stuck in a dead end sales exec role like I am now, so if I get a degree but am not able to go on to a career in Physics, then at least I have studied what I wanted to study but still benefit from it in a business focused career, which is where a lot of science students end up obviously
    Fair enough. There are two correct responses after being told about the poor career prospects and wanting to continue anyway ("It would be worth it even if I don't make it." and "I am a supergenius with IMO results/successful startups/whatever to prove it!") and you gave one of them.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Fair enough. There are two correct responses after being told about the poor career prospects and wanting to continue anyway ("It would be worth it even if I don't make it." and "I am a supergenius with IMO results/successful startups/whatever to prove it!" and you gave one of them.
    Well I am of course a supergenius as well but I didn't want to blow my own trumpet too loudly :P
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    Have you ever seen the television show The Big Bang Theory? It's loosely based on my life
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kk8q500rYo4

    IMO This video outlines pretty much everything, let me just emphasis what is said in the video and that is "You're going to need lots of maths", good luck!
 
 
 
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