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Could i get onto a undergrad Physics & Maths course without A-Levels? Watch

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    Hi,

    I really would like to do a Physics & Maths degree at Manchester University, my problem is that apart from 2 GCSE's in Science at grade C and one GCSE in Maths also grade C, I have no formal qualifications apart from a few vocational diplomas and a City&Guilds Lvl2.

    I do however have over 4 years of experience in several engineering disciplines and currently run rings around the graduates at my work place but have been told I will not be able to progress any further without a degree, will this actual on the job experience count as I contacted the Universities physics department to be told no go redo your A-Levels.

    Any insight is welcome.

    Thanks.
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    The course webpage looks quite clear, and if you've already contacted the admissions team then you've got your answer, I'm afraid.

    If you don't want to do A-levels/Access/foundation year you could go for the Open University.

    Also, work-based practical experience is very different to university-level knowledge - so even if you think you 'run rings around the graduates' you shouldn't assume you know more than them.
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    (Original post by SBlackhurst)
    Hi,

    I really would like to do a Physics & Maths degree at Manchester University, my problem is that apart from 2 GCSE's in Science at grade C and one GCSE in Maths also grade C, I have no formal qualifications apart from a few vocational diplomas and a City&Guilds Lvl2.

    I do however have over 4 years of experience in several engineering disciplines and currently run rings around the graduates at my work place but have been told I will not be able to progress any further without a degree, will this actual on the job experience count as I contacted the Universities physics department to be told no go redo your A-Levels.

    Any insight is welcome.

    Thanks.
    I'm afraid universities know what they want from applicants - if they're saying they want A levels then you're going to have to get A levels.

    It might be worth asking if there are any other routes they'd recommend or you could ask if they'd accept a transfer into Yr 2 if you complete (and succeed) with the OU Maths & Physics BSc http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q77

    Another option would be to try some maths/physics MOOCs eg from MIT: https://www.edx.org/school/mitx and see how you get on with them.
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    (Original post by SBlackhurst)
    Hi,

    I really would like to do a Physics & Maths degree at Manchester University, my problem is that apart from 2 GCSE's in Science at grade C and one GCSE in Maths also grade C, I have no formal qualifications apart from a few vocational diplomas and a City&Guilds Lvl2.

    I do however have over 4 years of experience in several engineering disciplines and currently run rings around the graduates at my work place but have been told I will not be able to progress any further without a degree, will this actual on the job experience count as I contacted the Universities physics department to be told no go redo your A-Levels.

    Any insight is welcome.

    Thanks.
    The skills needed to do well in a degree are different to the skills needed to do well at work. Universities still view most degrees as purely academic qualifications i.e. you're studying them for the love of the subject, rather than to progress in your career. That's part of the reason why you might be able to run rings around new graduates! However, the university probably want to see evidence of your ability to study, complete assignments, write essays and sit exams as well as just engineering knowledge.

    Have the university told you that only A-levels would be acceptable, or would another route like an access course be considered? Have you spoken to any universities other than Manchester?

    Do you actually want to do a degree for its own sake? Or are you purely interested in career progression?

    If it's the second, I'd be looking at moving companies to one with a more flexible attitude first, before considering getting a degree- even without A-levels, a degree is a three year long commitment to studying and that's not for everyone. It can be stressful in very different ways to work, and doing a degree might cause you a lot of financial strain (not just the debt you'd get into but taking at least three years away from full time work) unless your current company are willing to sponsor you.
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    (Original post by SBlackhurst)
    Hi,

    I really would like to do a Physics & Maths degree at Manchester University, my problem is that apart from 2 GCSE's in Science at grade C and one GCSE in Maths also grade C, I have no formal qualifications apart from a few vocational diplomas and a City&Guilds Lvl2.

    I do however have over 4 years of experience in several engineering disciplines and currently run rings around the graduates at my work place but have been told I will not be able to progress any further without a degree, will this actual on the job experience count as I contacted the Universities physics department to be told no go redo your A-Levels.

    Any insight is welcome.

    Thanks.
    If you are interested in an engineering career why do a degree in Physics & Maths?

    Also you might be able to become a Chartered Engineer without doing a formal MEng. Might be worth checking out the info/process here:
    http://www.engc.org.uk/informationfo...l-registrants/

    And here: https://www.imeche.org/membership-re...rther-learning
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Also you might be able to become a Chartered Engineer without doing a formal MEng. Might be worth checking out the info/process here:
    http://www.engc.org.uk/informationfo...l-registrants/

    And here: https://www.imeche.org/membership-re...rther-learning
    For CEng you need to have masters-level learning (usually an accredited MEng or BEng+MSc etc) so OP is several years away from this.

    OP - what is your current job? What job do you want to do?
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    For CEng you need to have masters-level learning (usually an accredited MEng or BEng+MSc etc) so OP is several years away from this.

    OP - what is your current job? What job do you want to do?
    Did you bother to read the links in the post you replied to?

    "A common misconception is that you will only be eligible for professional registration if you have an accredited engineering degree. This is not true.
    "Professional registration is open to anyone who can:
    • "Demonstrate both competence to perform professional work to the necessary standards, and commitment to maintain their competence
    • "Work within professional codes
    • "Participate actively within the profession
    "Academic and vocational qualifications can provide an indication of eligibility for the different titles, because they demonstrate your level of knowledge and understanding. "However, all round professional competence will be the deciding factor. There are several other ways in which the required knowledge, understanding and skills can be demonstrated if you don’t have relevant qualifications. These can be found in UK-SPEC for EngTech, IEng or CEng and in the ICTTech Standard for ICTTech. Your institution can advise you further once they have assessed your qualifications, training and experience."
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Did you bother to read the links in the post you replied to?
    Yes. You obviously didn't. If you had you would have read the UK-SPEC for CEng and seen what is required. Re-read my post - I never said OP needed any particular degree.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Did you bother to read the links in the post you replied to?

    "A common misconception is that you will only be eligible for professional registration if you have an accredited engineering degree. This is not true.
    "Professional registration is open to anyone who can:
    • "Demonstrate both competence to perform professional work to the necessary standards, and commitment to maintain their competence
    • "Work within professional codes
    • "Participate actively within the profession
    "Academic and vocational qualifications can provide an indication of eligibility for the different titles, because they demonstrate your level of knowledge and understanding. "However, all round professional competence will be the deciding factor. There are several other ways in which the required knowledge, understanding and skills can be demonstrated if you don’t have relevant qualifications. These can be found in UK-SPEC for EngTech, IEng or CEng and in the ICTTech Standard for ICTTech. Your institution can advise you further once they have assessed your qualifications, training and experience."
    Indeed
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    For CEng you need to have masters-level learning (usually an accredited MEng or BEng+MSc etc) so OP is several years away from this.

    OP - what is your current job? What job do you want to do?
    "Masters-level" doesn't necessarily mean doing a straight-up masters:

    IMechE’sFurther Learning must fulfill the QAA benchmark statements by demonstrating knowledge and understanding in the following 2 areas:
    · 1) Deepening of knowledge in Engineering & Scientific subjects:
    • This is a key component andmust be clearly spelled out
    • Must be to Master’s levelfor those seeking CEng and Bachelors for IEng
    Deeper learning can be gained at work through research, deep level projects and technical reporting; thismay be difficult for some engineers to demonstrate early on, and therefore can also be achieved by academic study

    2) Broadening of knowledge in Non-Technical and technical subjects:
    • Examples: projectmanagement; exploring or researching ethical and legal issues; costoptimisation; cost and quality management; make or buy decisions; productmarketing; involvement in customer and supplier relationships etc
    • Expanding on technical knowledge and yourunderstanding of principles of engineering, various use of analytical methods
    • You will prepare academic style reports about learning and knowledge andunderstanding you have gained - These reports and presentations must beassessed (eg by a CEng Mentor, technical specialist in that area)
    • Through work based knowledge or additional courses and seminars at universities and colleges
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    (Original post by jneill)
    "Masters-level" doesn't necessarily mean doing a straight-up masters:
    That was what I said.

    Page 30 of UK-SPEC describes the requirement.
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    That was what I said.

    Page 30 of UK-SPEC describes the requirement.
    So why did you call me out when I said "Also you might be able to become a Chartered Engineer without doing a formal MEng"?

    Anyway, if you are agreeing with me let's move on.

    The key points are OP doesn't need a BSc + Masters. AND OP needs to confirm if he want to be an engineer anyway...
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    (Original post by jneill)
    So why did you call me out when I said "Also you might be able to become a Chartered Engineer without doing a formal MEng"?

    Anyway, if you are agreeing with me let's move on.

    The key points are OP doesn't need a BSc + Masters. AND OP needs to confirm if he want to be an engineer anyway...
    You said OP could consider CEng - I was making the point that they would almost certainly require several years further study/learning to have a level of knowledge where they could consider it. PQ then jumped in and arrogantly asked whether I'd bothered to read the links while posting irrelevant quotes. I'm very familiar with UK-SPEC.

    If OP is currently unable to get on a BSc (or MMath&Phys) as described in the first post I suggest this talk of CEng is moot anyway. We should be giving him useful advice. I'll wait and see what he says next before I respond again on this thread.
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    (Original post by SBlackhurst)
    Hi,

    I really would like to do a Physics & Maths degree at Manchester University, my problem is that apart from 2 GCSE's in Science at grade C and one GCSE in Maths also grade C, I have no formal qualifications apart from a few vocational diplomas and a City&Guilds Lvl2.

    I do however have over 4 years of experience in several engineering disciplines and currently run rings around the graduates at my work place but have been told I will not be able to progress any further without a degree, will this actual on the job experience count as I contacted the Universities physics department to be told no go redo your A-Levels.

    Any insight is welcome.

    Thanks.
    I was in a similar position; I was home educated and have no GCSEs or A levels, however I did take 5 courses with the Open University. I am currently in my first year of a Physics undergrad at the University of Edinburgh.

    I did apply to the University of Manchester, however at the interview where I was asked about my qualifications and asked to solve some equations, the interviewer was less than understanding of my background, and although I solved the questions correctly they did not offer me a place. I would recommend not limiting yourself to one university.
 
 
 
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