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The Oscars, Black Nominees, and the '1-in-5' Rape Statistic Watch

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    This year's Oscars ceremony was a very political one. So awash with pretentious (and inaccurate) activism, in fact, that I found it difficult to watch at times.

    Firstly, the 'diversity' issue. This has been in the news and discussed for weeks now. Several black actors have 'spoken out' against the lack of black nominees this year, claiming that the Oscars are too white. But this is despite the fact black people are actually proportionately represented in Oscar wins and nominations on average. Just not this year, which must of course be a white supremacist conspiracy. Perhaps the Hispanics and Asians have more of a case to make, but comparatively little was said about them.

    Secondly came Lady Gaga and her sexual assault anthem. I appreciated the fact she included male survivors (though I really don't like that word) in her stage performance, but her touting of the debunked "1 in 5 women are raped before graduating college" factoid made me cringe. This kind of fearmongering and exaggeration is more of a disservice.

    1 in 5 women are not raped at university. The frequently cited 2007 internet survey that this originally came from specified sexual assault, not rape. Even in this, the much-disputed study did not keep within the legal definitions of rape and sexual assault, and included things like sex while drunk, attempted kissing, etc, and even acts like voyeurism and stalking. Several subsequent studies have done the same (also with small sample sizes and low response rates) which is why the numbers appear so high. Reports which stick to the proper definitions, and actually ask respondents whether or not they were raped or assaulted, tend to produce much less drastic figures. The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, for example, places the rape and sexual assault victimization rate (of females) at 2 per 1,000 students and 1.9 per 1,000 students respectively between 1995 and 2013. This also includes 'unreported' instances. And the rates have almost halved since 1997, despite being a 'growing epidemic', according to activists.

    In summary, while I'm sure these Hollywood stars mean well, what they're saying doesn't always stand up to scrutiny and can do more to mislead the public than actually inform them intelligently.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    This year's Oscars ceremony was a very political one. So awash with pretentious (and inaccurate) activism, in fact, that I found it difficult to watch at times.

    Firstly, the 'diversity' issue. This has been in the news and discussed for weeks now. Several black actors have 'spoken out' against the lack of black nominees this year, claiming that the Oscars are too white. But this is despite the fact black people are actually proportionately represented in Oscar wins and nominations on average. Just not this year, which must of course be a white supremacist conspiracy. Perhaps the Hispanics and Asians have more of a case to make, but comparatively little was said about them.
    Think of it this way:

    Hispanics in the US have their own industry and most Latins will just watch their own networks, as the programmes mostly come from other Latin(o) countries. Asians in the world have their own industry(ies): Bollywood is prominent globally; Jpop, Kpop, etc. Black people are the ones who have to work alongside the mainstream/white industry because they have no independent industry except BET. Which doesn't show programmes from black African and Caribbean nations. It relies on showing what is done in the nation in which you are watching BET. While Asian channels like Star or whatever it's called can still keep in touch with what is done in their motherland. Blacks don't have that. BET wasn't bestowed from the gov't either; it was founded by a black entrepreneur, but it was founded because blacks weren't represented equally.

    Also people accusing Smith of an ego trip. If that's what it takes, while others tucked their tails between their legs and accepted their hush money and ignored racism in the film industry in general. The Oscars represents the film industry...it just represents it poorly. The issue with black entertainers being redundant in the film world comes from producers downing script pitches from black screenwriters, and casting agencies looking for whatever they're looking for. But people don't talk about that they just cry about the Oscars.

    When you bring race into anything it becomes legitimate, like it or not. Because it's not a lie that Hollywood, the film industry in US and the world, and the Oscars are NOT diverse. Also the Hispanics and Asians often grieve the exaltation of white beauty in their own industries. They're probably either rolling their eyes or backing the blacks in the shadows about lack of diversity, it depends on the type of person they are.
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africa...Academy_Awards






    #AfricaMovieAcademyAwardsSoBlack .
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    This year's Oscars ceremony was a very political one. So awash with pretentious (and inaccurate) activism, in fact, that I found it difficult to watch at times.

    In summary, while I'm sure these Hollywood stars mean well, what they're saying doesn't always stand up to scrutiny and can do more to mislead the public than actually inform them intelligently.
    This statement could be said after every Oscars. 2016's was nothing special.
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    This literally has nothing to do with the American Academy Awards.
    While racism does.
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    (Original post by EphemeralLove)
    This literally has nothing to do with the American Academy Awards.
    While racism does.
    I'm merely pointing out how triggered I am as a white person by the complete lack of white representation in the African movie industry.
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    (Original post by Greenlaner)
    I'm merely pointing out how triggered I am as a white person by the complete lack of white representation in the African movie industry.
    I'm surprised South Africa is not involved in that African Academy Awards thing. If they did, there would be 1 or 2 white people winning awards, which would go with representation.

    In the USA, 13% of the population is Black, yet only 1 person, an Ethiopian-Canadian, was nominated for an Academy Award. It's not about just about raw numbers, it's about representation.
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    (Original post by asmuse123)
    In the USA, 13% of the population is Black, yet only 1 person, an Ethiopian-Canadian, was nominated for an Academy Award. It's not about just about raw numbers, it's about representation.
    'Racial representation' is not the purpose of the Acadamy Awards. It should not be built around a patronising system of racial quotas; it should represent merit alone.

    This year didn't have that many black nominees. But so what? Why does that really matter? In the long term (over the past decade, for example), the number of black people winning more-or-less mirrors the population percentage, anyway. And there is going to be some year-to-year variation.
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    (Original post by EphemeralLove)
    This literally has nothing to do with the American Academy Awards.
    While racism does.
    (Original post by asmuse123)
    I'm surprised South Africa is not involved in that African Academy Awards thing. If they did, there would be 1 or 2 white people winning awards, which would go with representation.

    In the USA, 13% of the population is Black, yet only 1 person, an Ethiopian-Canadian, was nominated for an Academy Award. It's not about just about raw numbers, it's about representation.
    Would you like to know who the big loser is in this whole Oscar race controversy? It is the many gifted black artists who get nominated next year. Should we attribute that nomination to their talent/performance, or to social appeasement? The real loser is the African American who wins. Maybe it will be after a career of struggling to establish their credentials. Maybe it will be after the performance of a lifetime. Regardless, their much earned recognition will be tarnished by the previous year's social agenda. Any artist of color, who happens to win next year, will be considered a token winner in spite of their merit. That is what black social activists who demand "representation" have done for them. If I was a black best actor nominee, I would hate their ****ing guts.
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    (Original post by EphemeralLove)
    Black people are the ones who have to work alongside the mainstream/white industry because they have no independent industry except BET. Which doesn't show programmes from black African and Caribbean nations. It relies on showing what is done in the nation in which you are watching BET..
    Wait, so black people shouldn't be naturalized? If they are the wrong skin colour they shouldn't be included into the cultural fold of the country they are from?
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    (Original post by Farm_Ecology)
    Wait, so black people shouldn't be naturalized? If they are the wrong skin colour they shouldn't be included into the cultural fold of the country they are from?
    What?
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    (Original post by ckingalt)
    Would you like to know who the big loser is in this whole Oscar race controversy? It is the many gifted black artists who get nominated next year. Should we attribute that nomination to their talent/performance, or to social appeasement?
    I said that... as an alternative perspective, but still you're playing devil's advocate.

    It's all about acknowledging that there is no equal representation.
    The boycott's purpose was to make that statement.

    NOT to "demand" automatic black nominees....

    And whatever the ulterior motive may be, it's not a lie that still the industry is racist. Even white actors high and low in the industry openly echoed this!
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    (Original post by ckingalt)
    Would you like to know who the big loser is in this whole Oscar race controversy? It is the many gifted black artists who get nominated next year. Should we attribute that nomination to their talent/performance, or to social appeasement? The real loser is the African American who wins. Maybe it will be after a career of struggling to establish their credentials. Maybe it will be after the performance of a lifetime. Regardless, their much earned recognition will be tarnished by the previous year's social agenda. Any artist of color, who happens to win next year, will be considered a token winner in spite of their merit. That is what black social activists who demand "representation" have done for them. If I was a black best actor nominee, I would hate their ****ing guts.
    At the same time, you're not Black, so you can't speak for Black people, and this affects many Black people, especially African-Americans. I don't speak for White people, because my experiences don't relate to me being White, which I'm not, so I cannot speak for White people, without understanding what it means to be White. Same thing for you. All Black people I know would find it either good (most), or neutral. None of the Black people I know, including myself, would find representation in the Oscars bad.
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    (Original post by asmuse123)
    At the same time, you're not Black, so you can't speak for Black people, and this affects many Black people, especially African-Americans. I don't speak for White people, because my experiences don't relate to me being White, which I'm not, so I cannot speak for White people, without understanding what it means to be White. Same thing for you. All Black people I know would find it either good (most), or neutral. None of the Black people I know, including myself, would find representation in the Oscars bad.
    It affects their egos, nothing more. I honestly can't think of a standout performance by a black actor in a movie apart from Michael B. Jordan in Creed, although granted I didn't watch many in 2015. Haven't seen Concussion so can't comment on that but honestly, who would you have nominated instead? Jamie Foxx said it best, if you want to be on the stage you have to step up to it and act your ass off. We can't be making Ride Along 2 and Fifty Shades of Black and expecting people to clap and cheer for us.
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    What's amazing is so many people are criticising the lack of black nominees but I haven't heard a reasonable suggestion of a black person who should have been nominated


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    "“Black people did not protest [in the 60s] because we had real things to care about… Too busy being raped and lynched to care about who won Best cinematographer.” -Chris Rock

    This quote pretty much sums it up pretty well - protest for things that matter.
 
 
 
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