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    Im doing such a fobby degree and you did physics and you're unable to find a job? Wow. :/ I hope you get something - keep on trying I guess
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    This post is another piece of proof that a slight amount of luck is pretty much always needed. I'm not saying win the lottery luck, but right timing, favourable competition in terms of pool of applicants, lucky interview day etc.
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Hi guys,

    I graduated last summer with a bachelors degree in physics and I have been unemployed ever since. My self esteem and feelings of self worth are shot to pieces. I can no longer go on websites such as linkedin, as all it does is confirm that everyone is better and smarter and more mature than I am, apparently. I have seen people magic careers out of nothing.

    My CV isn't too bad. My academics are strong from GCSE through to degree level, and I've had a few jobs in admin and retail. I also did some volunteer work with children a few years ago. I've mainly been applying to science jobs as that is what my degree is in. I also applied to the GCHQ graduate scheme but was unsuccessful. Before anyone mentions it, no I don't have aspergers or anything like that - my social skills are pretty good.

    I just don't know what to do. To make matters worse, some other people from my course are doing well, even someone who dropped out (I'll get onto this later).

    I will give a recent example of my struggles. There is a company in Manchester called nanoco technologies who are an employer of STEM graduates. I noticed on linkedin that someone from my course has been working there for a few months. "Great" I thought. The website said it welcomed expressions of interest so I proceeded to send my CV. Tumbleweed. I have not heard a thing from them and I even tried a second time. This is typical of my experiences. I have relevent practical skills that no one from my course has (such as CVD) and I completed a module in nanotechnology and got 83% - the highest on my course. You know what really bugs me? The person who works there from my course was a really mediocre student, I recall people telling her the answers during labs. Did they know someone in the company?

    The person who dropped out of my course is now a software engineer for the DWP. What the heck. She had no prior experience or qualifications in programming. Her previous job was as an office assistant. I just don't get it. Fast stream without a degree? She has numerous programming languages listed on linkedin so this is another thing I don't quite understand. She must have known these to apply for the job I would assume, so how did she learn them on her own to a high level? I am more than willing to put the leg-work in and learn these languages, but I don't know where to start. It's things like javascript and CSS.

    I could go on with more examples but I will only depress myself. I could do with some practical advice on the following:

    - Where are the BEST places to look for jobs
    - Should I cold call
    - Where can I learn java, javascript, CSS, HTML etc

    It would also be nice to hear from people in a similar position, as right now, it feels like everyone has a job except me.
    You really should look at teaching. The Institute of Physics is giving tax free 30k bursaries to anyone with a good physics degree to train. There is a desperate shortage of degree level physics teachers across the uk. At my sisters grammar,they actually mentioned the fact that they had recruited a qualified physics teacher in the Christmas end of term newsletter- they descibed it as success in a seeminglingly impossible task- they never comment on any other recruitment except for very senior roles.
    Given Teach First - and now the ability to escalate your pay while remaining a teacher, as a subject specialist, the profession is rising in peoples perceptions, and becoming more attractive and respectably paid. And as given your subject, you need never spend long in a rubbish school- you could easily go somewhere where people want to learn.
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Not to scare you even more but my friend got a first in English Literature in 2012 and now works as an office assistant...
    DON'T TELL ME THAT.

    It's okay. I can have a year abroad and a useful language. It's okay.
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Not to scare you even more but my friend got a first in English Literature in 2012 and now works as an office assistant...
    Well many graduates work in non-graduates jobs. So I'm not surprised at all. I know someone who has been unemployed for 2 years after graduating
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Hi guys,

    I graduated last summer with a bachelors degree in physics and I have been unemployed ever since. My self esteem and feelings of self worth are shot to pieces. I can no longer go on websites such as linkedin, as all it does is confirm that everyone is better and smarter and more mature than I am, apparently. I have seen people magic careers out of nothing.

    My CV isn't too bad. My academics are strong from GCSE through to degree level, and I've had a few jobs in admin and retail. I also did some volunteer work with children a few years ago. I've mainly been applying to science jobs as that is what my degree is in. I also applied to the GCHQ graduate scheme but was unsuccessful. Before anyone mentions it, no I don't have aspergers or anything like that - my social skills are pretty good.

    I just don't know what to do. To make matters worse, some other people from my course are doing well, even someone who dropped out (I'll get onto this later).

    I will give a recent example of my struggles. There is a company in Manchester called nanoco technologies who are an employer of STEM graduates. I noticed on linkedin that someone from my course has been working there for a few months. "Great" I thought. The website said it welcomed expressions of interest so I proceeded to send my CV. Tumbleweed. I have not heard a thing from them and I even tried a second time. This is typical of my experiences. I have relevent practical skills that no one from my course has (such as CVD) and I completed a module in nanotechnology and got 83% - the highest on my course. You know what really bugs me? The person who works there from my course was a really mediocre student, I recall people telling her the answers during labs. Did they know someone in the company?

    The person who dropped out of my course is now a software engineer for the DWP. What the heck. She had no prior experience or qualifications in programming. Her previous job was as an office assistant. I just don't get it. Fast stream without a degree? She has numerous programming languages listed on linkedin so this is another thing I don't quite understand. She must have known these to apply for the job I would assume, so how did she learn them on her own to a high level? I am more than willing to put the leg-work in and learn these languages, but I don't know where to start. It's things like javascript and CSS.

    I could go on with more examples but I will only depress myself. I could do with some practical advice on the following:

    - Where are the BEST places to look for jobs
    - Should I cold call
    - Where can I learn java, javascript, CSS, HTML etc

    It would also be nice to hear from people in a similar position, as right now, it feels like everyone has a job except me.
    You could always be a human scarecrow!

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...scarecrow.html
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Hi guys,I graduated last summer with a bachelors degree in physics and I have been unemployed ever since. My self esteem and feelings of self worth are shot to pieces. I can no longer go on websites such as linkedin, as all it does is confirm that everyone is better and smarter and more mature than I am, apparently. I have seen people magic careers out of nothing.My CV isn't too bad. My academics are strong from GCSE through to degree level, and I've had a few jobs in admin and retail. I also did some volunteer work with children a few years ago. I've mainly been applying to science jobs as that is what my degree is in. I also applied to the GCHQ graduate scheme but was unsuccessful. Before anyone mentions it, no I don't have aspergers or anything like that - my social skills are pretty good.I just don't know what to do. To make matters worse, some other people from my course are doing well, even someone who dropped out (I'll get onto this later).I will give a recent example of my struggles. There is a company in Manchester called nanoco technologies who are an employer of STEM graduates. I noticed on linkedin that someone from my course has been working there for a few months. "Great" I thought. The website said it welcomed expressions of interest so I proceeded to send my CV. Tumbleweed. I have not heard a thing from them and I even tried a second time. This is typical of my experiences. I have relevent practical skills that no one from my course has (such as CVD) and I completed a module in nanotechnology and got 83% - the highest on my course. You know what really bugs me? The person who works there from my course was a really mediocre student, I recall people telling her the answers during labs. Did they know someone in the company? The person who dropped out of my course is now a software engineer for the DWP. What the heck. She had no prior experience or qualifications in programming. Her previous job was as an office assistant. I just don't get it. Fast stream without a degree? She has numerous programming languages listed on linkedin so this is another thing I don't quite understand. She must have known these to apply for the job I would assume, so how did she learn them on her own to a high level? I am more than willing to put the leg-work in and learn these languages, but I don't know where to start. It's things like javascript and CSS.I could go on with more examples but I will only depress myself. I could do with some practical advice on the following:- Where are the BEST places to look for jobs- Should I cold call- Where can I learn java, javascript, CSS, HTML etcIt would also be nice to hear from people in a similar position, as right now, it feels like everyone has a job except me.
    I know the feeling, I am sort of in the same position. However, I haven't shunned any work or limited myself to any kind of work after university.Graduated last summer with a first too (in Criminology and Sociology) and thought it would be very easy to get a job within the Criminal Justice sector or local authority, but I was wrong. For all the jobs I applied for, graduate inclusive, I received zero offers but the usual' sorry.....you have not been successful'. It made me depressed and miserable, yet I knew someone on my course, who got a 2:2 but already had a job working with a local authority, roughly a month before we even graduated. ‘Dusted’ myself up and decided I wouldn’t shun any work, even outside my area of expertise or ‘comfort zone’. I got a warehouse night job with Sainsburys’, in the clothing section. During day I would apply for other jobs or visit other agencies, within my area. Luckily, I found the agency that recruits for my local authority. Within three weeks, the agency had got me a job within a finance department (sorry, cannot mention which one exactly). The temp role just ended recently. However, I applied for a similar role in London with a local authority and I have an interview scheduled for Wednesday. My Advice:
    1. Don’t shun any work, employers these days overlook degree classifications. There are certain skills and experiences that they look for. The job I just concluded included working with work colleagues, who did not have educational qualifications (not even GCSEs) but had been working for the council from when they were sixteen and are now in their early 50s. I started out by sorting, scanning mail and issuing other paper work for the department but because I was a quick learner, within three days, they brought in someone else to do that and I was assigned work similar to my other colleagues.
    1. If you’re willing and can relocate, consider it an option. My interview on Wednesday is in London but I live outside London. If you believe it might be financially difficult for you to get to a certain place, JSA should help you with that or they’ll give you a ‘travel warrant’ to cover your travel expenses.
    1. Believe in yourself and do not give up. Do not compare yourself to others and do not set the bar high for yourself. Employers would prefer someone, who has a minimum of GCSE qualifications than an undergraduate because they possess the drive, hunger and passion to learn and succeed (unfortunately that’s how things are sometimes for certain roles). You learn different skills or your skills are enhanced for any type of employment. Whether its accuracy, time management or team work, such skills can be applied to a work force environment.
    Good luck and always remember, you’ll get there. The journey began when you graduated. x
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    Which university?
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    Hi guys,

    I graduated last summer with a bachelors degree in physics and I have been unemployed ever since. My self esteem and feelings of self worth are shot to pieces. I can no longer go on websites such as linkedin, as all it does is confirm that everyone is better and smarter and more mature than I am, apparently. I have seen people magic careers out of nothing.

    My CV isn't too bad. My academics are strong from GCSE through to degree level, and I've had a few jobs in admin and retail. I also did some volunteer work with children a few years ago. I've mainly been applying to science jobs as that is what my degree is in. I also applied to the GCHQ graduate scheme but was unsuccessful. Before anyone mentions it, no I don't have aspergers or anything like that - my social skills are pretty good.

    I just don't know what to do. To make matters worse, some other people from my course are doing well, even someone who dropped out (I'll get onto this later).

    I will give a recent example of my struggles. There is a company in Manchester called nanoco technologies who are an employer of STEM graduates. I noticed on linkedin that someone from my course has been working there for a few months. "Great" I thought. The website said it welcomed expressions of interest so I proceeded to send my CV. Tumbleweed. I have not heard a thing from them and I even tried a second time. This is typical of my experiences. I have relevent practical skills that no one from my course has (such as CVD) and I completed a module in nanotechnology and got 83% - the highest on my course. You know what really bugs me? The person who works there from my course was a really mediocre student, I recall people telling her the answers during labs. Did they know someone in the company?

    The person who dropped out of my course is now a software engineer for the DWP. What the heck. She had no prior experience or qualifications in programming. Her previous job was as an office assistant. I just don't get it. Fast stream without a degree? She has numerous programming languages listed on linkedin so this is another thing I don't quite understand. She must have known these to apply for the job I would assume, so how did she learn them on her own to a high level? I am more than willing to put the leg-work in and learn these languages, but I don't know where to start. It's things like javascript and CSS.

    I could go on with more examples but I will only depress myself. I could do with some practical advice on the following:

    - Where are the BEST places to look for jobs
    - Should I cold call
    - Where can I learn java, javascript, CSS, HTML etc

    It would also be nice to hear from people in a similar position, as right now, it feels like everyone has a job except me.
    I notice that company is currently advertising for paid internships over the summer open to recent graduates and students working towards a degree...
    http://www.nanocotechnologies.com/jo...93-summer-2016

    IMO you should be tailoring your CV to each company you're applying to rather than spamming out the exact same generic document every time - if you've done particularly well in a relevant module to their business you want to emphasise the hell out that module in particular and not bury it in the middle of a list.

    in any case, try get an idea of what they're looking for on their website - you're trying to echo their values back at them without looking like you've literally copy and pasted their buzzwords.

    CV should be like an advertisment - not just a list of facts.
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    (Original post by whorace)
    I've been teaching myself C++ and Java in my spare time for 4 years so this post makes me feel great.


    Could I ask what sort of books or websites did you use?

    Any advice for someone who wants to follow in your footsteps?
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    Don't be afraid to start at the bottom and work your way up, regardless of what degree you have and what class you received.
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    lol

    hamoncheese


    You sound very similar to me. I graduated in physics a year before you. I've even applied to that same nanotechnology company in Manchester three times for entry level physics type jobs.

    Almost been two years since I graduated now. That's the generally considered cut of point to where your degree means anything now.


    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    Don't be afraid to start at the bottom and work your way up, regardless of what degree you have and what class you received.
    Other than say applying to be a cleaner at somewhere like that nanotech company in OP with the hope that if a job does become available they will already know you, there isn't much else you can do. Those jobs are entry level jobs for physics. Working in the lab as a glorified lab tech is entry level in that field. Even being a cleaner is hard since you have so much competition and you are major over qualified. I would say trying to target a single cleaner role at a particular company is probably harder than targeting a single science job. The only way to get min wage work is to scattergun everywhere. Apart from showing you can hold down a job, why should NANOCO care that you are a cleaner?

    (Original post by samina_ay)
    Im doing such a fobby degree and you did physics and you're unable to find a job? Wow. :/ I hope you get something - keep on trying I guess
    I think the moral of the story is that it doesn't really matter what degree you do
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    lol

    hamoncheese


    You sound very similar to me. I graduated in physics a year before you. I've even applied to that same nanotechnology company in Manchester three times for entry level physics type jobs.

    Almost been two years since I graduated now. That's the generally considered cut of point to where your degree means anything now.


    Other than say applying to be a cleaner at somewhere like that nanotech company in OP with the hope that if a job does become available they will already know you, there isn't much else you can do. Those jobs are entry level jobs for physics. Working in the lab as a glorified lab tech is entry level in that field. Even being a cleaner is hard since you have so much competition and you are major over qualified. I would say trying to target a single cleaner role at a particular company is probably harder than targeting a single science job. The only way to get min wage work is to scattergun everywhere. Apart from showing you can hold down a job, why should NANOCO care that you are a cleaner?
    Companies don't generally hire their own cleaners anymore - they get a cleaning agency to send X number of cleaners round for Y hours per day...

    for the same money (minimum wage) you'd be better off as a sales assistant in Maplin or similar imo. 6+ months of unemployment doesn't look good - i.e. it's easier to get a job when you've already got a job.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Companies don't generally hire their own cleaners anymore - they get a cleaning agency to send X number of cleaners round for Y hours per day...

    for the same money (minimum wage) you'd be better off as a sales assistant in Maplin or similar imo. 6+ months of unemployment doesn't look good - i.e. it's easier to get a job when you've already got a job.
    I've been in and out of temp jobs. Part of it is that whilst I have the job I am too lazy/knackered to apply for other warehouse jobs but it had made no difference as far as I can tell when I was applying for jobs whilst I had a job.

    Warehouse is my preferred type of min wage work and the only work I have had success in getting. Still same problem. Apart from showing I can hole down a job (which I'm not given the chance since it is all temp) why should a nanotech company care about my ability to move stock around? I've tried applying for lab stock type jobs since there might be some overlap but still no luck. My degree seems to mean nothing for grad jobs and it makes me overqualified for everything else, even lab techs jobs, I was told in one interview for a lab tech position that they didn't trust me not to run off and go work for NASA. -.-

    Lab tech jobs either want you to have experience in that line of work or you to just have science A-levels.

    (Original post by Joinedup)
    I notice that company is currently advertising for paid internships over the summer open to recent graduates and students working towards a degree...http://www.nanocotechnologies.com/jo...93-summer-2016
    Hey! I've applied for that. Stop increasing my competition. OP is more suited to that than me since he hasn't been out of uni for as long as me

    In all likelyhood that will go to someone who is currently at uni.

    I think I applied for that when I was in my second year at uni as well. That company probably has my name black listed :mad:
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    Would you consider taking a PGCE? There's a shortage of secondary school Physics teachers
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    (Original post by hamoncheese)
    *edit*

    Forget university guys. Nepotism is king.

    - brb university drop out.
    - brb no experience or qualifications in programming.
    - brb software engineer in civil service.
    - brb wealthy parents.
    What do you actually want to do?

    The advice above about customising your CV is particularly worthwhile - you say your CV is "not bad" which implies that you just have one. If you are sending speculative applications then you need a master template CV that you adjust for every single company...sending a CV is the ropiest way of applying for jobs and is highly unlikely to work unless you present yourself as someone ready to hit the ground running and with a good understanding of the company culture and priorities.

    Are you regularly checking http://jobs.newscientist.com/jobs/physics/ and http://www.jobs.ac.uk/ (both for jobs and for studentships)?

    Do you track local large employers for vacancies? A lot of employers wont pay to advertise vacancies because they know they don't have to.

    Have you tapped into your university careers service?

    Have you contacted your course leaders to ask if they know of any vacancies?

    Have you visited any recruitment fairs? http://www.thenec.co.uk/whatson/the-...ion-exhibition or http://www.ipexpomanchester.com/Exhibitors/
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    I've been in and out of temp jobs. Part of it is that whilst I have the job I am too lazy/knackered to apply for other warehouse jobs but it had made no difference as far as I can tell when I was applying for jobs whilst I had a job.

    Warehouse is my preferred type of min wage work and the only work I have had success in getting. Still same problem. Apart from showing I can hole down a job (which I'm not given the chance since it is all temp) why should a nanotech company care about my ability to move stock around? I've tried applying for lab stock type jobs since there might be some overlap but still no luck. My degree seems to mean nothing for grad jobs and it makes me overqualified for everything else, even lab techs jobs, I was told in one interview for a lab tech position that they didn't trust me not to run off and go work for NASA. -.-

    Lab tech jobs either want you to have experience in that line of work or you to just have science A-levels.

    Hey! I've applied for that. Stop increasing my competition. OP is more suited to that than me since he hasn't been out of uni for as long as me

    In all likelyhood that will go to someone who is currently at uni.

    I think I applied for that when I was in my second year at uni as well. That company probably has my name black listed :mad:
    That's just negative thinking - tbh they probably just throw the old cv's in the shredder every few months, unlikely they can bothered running vendettas against people.


    Worth noting for you and OP that a lot of uni careers services are open to recent graduates for ~2 years, even after that it might be worth dropping in when they're quiet and seeing if they'll give you the names of any employers who've been asking about physics students recently.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    I think the moral of the story is that it doesn't really matter what degree you do
    I hope the smiley at the end indicates sarcasm.

    There are huge differences in employability and earnings across degrees. Physics does very well. You and the OP may just be outliers, and we should be very wary about drawing conclusions from outliers.
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    Keep in touch with people - linkedin isn't just for grinding your teeth at people who are currently moving forward faster than you... it's the 6 degrees of separation thing... listen to this http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0717kvf the actual 6th level connections are in fact pretty useless but there's a lot of strength in the weak 1st and 2nd level connections (like being on the same uni course as someone)

    if someone who is on your course has got a job in a sector you're interested in they've probably got information that'd be useful to you... new financial year starts soon and managers will be getting their budgets which might include more staff.

    useful information means how well the company they're working for is doing... but they also might know how well their customers are doing, how well their suppliers are doing and how well their competitors are doing.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    I hope the smiley at the end indicates sarcasm.

    There are huge differences in employability and earnings across degrees. Physics does very well. You and the OP may just be outliers, and we should be very wary about drawing conclusions from outliers.
    There generally isn't.

    The graduates themselves are the ones who chart their own destiny. Whether you did English or Engineering, if you don't seek out the opportunities to improve your CV whilst at uni, you'll get rejected. A Physics degree by itself isn't going to do much help without any experience to accompany it.

    So really the takeaway is: start thinking about how you can improve your profile/CV from the moment you step on campus because if you don't someone else will and they'll be the person out-competing you for an interview slot.

    The same goes to the people asking 'what university?', it won't make any material difference.


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