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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    I don't see how it would be lifesaving when it is not a life threatening condition.

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    Because trans people are at a higher risk of suicide than anyone else, especially with waiting times and discrimination/transphobia experiences within the nhs and aspects of our lives
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    NJS England is currently re-designing services, it's a long term project but how things work will change soon and continue to. They are taking getting waiting times down seriously but the main issue is having qualified staff but they are working with the Royal Colleges on it. I'm not sure we'll quite get an informed consent model but I think we'll be much closer to it than gatekeeper models we have now.

    These sorts of things are much more productive than GP prescribing because it's not safe without specialist input. I don't see a gender clinic any more but I still see an endo because it's specialist, just hormone prescribing let alone for trans people. You don't really want someone prescribing outwith their competencies, it'll end badly.


    I transitioned at uni. My friends were mostly queer so didn't care. I had brightly coloured hair so even in a course of 200 people I was pretty visible and nobody ever said anything to me. I didn't make a fuss, I just let it happen and I'm sure people caught on. But people at unis are well educated, typically quite middle class, more of the politically correct disposition so it's a fairly safe place. I'm glad I transitioned at uni and was able to enter the world of real jobs with my documents changed and looking male because I think transitioning in a workplace can be much harder.

    Though it did affect my studies, I scrapped a 2.1 but I very easily could have not got it. I had times when I was just stressed to hell dealing with transition stuff that did studying no good at all. I wasn't always mentally doing great and I don't think I enjoyed the social side of uni as much because of it. But equally waiting to transition wouldn't have help these things either.

    I'm not really sure what else you might want to know but feel free to ask.
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    (Original post by AlteredBoy)
    Because trans people are at a higher risk of suicide than anyone else, especially with waiting times and discrimination/transphobia experiences within the nhs and aspects of our lives
    But statistically, transgender people who undergo surgery/transition are just as likely, and even more in some cases undergo suicide. So why should the state have to pick up the tab for therapy that is proven to not work?

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...h.mentalhealth
    (And there are many others out there at a quick google search.)
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    (Original post by Xelfrost)
    But statistically, transgender people who undergo surgery/transition are just as likely, and even more in some cases undergo suicide. So why should the state have to pick up the tab for therapy that is proven to not work?

    Source: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...h.mentalhealth
    (And there are many others out there at a quick google search.)
    That's a very old article*. http://genderanalysis.net/2015/09/pa...r-analysis-10/ has more up to date research with full citations
    • A study from Belgium in 2006 found that trans people’s rates of suicide attempts dropped from 29.3% before surgery to 5.1% after.
    • Another study of 50 trans women who received genital surgery found that their physical and mental health was not significantly different from samples of cis women.
    • A 2013 study of 433 trans people in Canada found that 27% of those who hadn’t begun transitioning had attempted suicide in the past year, but this dropped to 1% for those who were finished transitioning.
    • And a 2010 meta-analysis of 28 studies showed that 78% of trans people showed animprovement in psychiatric symptoms after transitioning, with a level of psychological functioning similar to the general population and greater than that of untreated trans people.
    *and misrepresents the findings of the research: see http://www.cakeworld.info/news/2014-...sayresearchers for more info
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    I've sent a link to this thread over to someone close to me who's FTM and started to transition while doing a postgrad course. He found it to be a pretty positive experience, and he's since gone into a professional graduate job. Hopefully he'll be able to respond.

    (Original post by AlteredBoy)
    Hey guys, I realised that I'll start getting appointments at The Laurels whilst I'm in my first year of uni, and was wondering if anyone had any anecdotes (good or bad!) that might help me comprehend what it's going to be like?

    Also! I'm currently running a petition to get bridging hormone prescriptions more accessible through a GP: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/122488
    With regards to the bridging hormones, what I will say is that while I 100% agree that the GIC waiting times are frankly ridiculous and need to be sorted out (the aforementioned FTM friend ended up going private for hormones - which turned out to be a very good use of a sum that was, I think, a little under a grand in total, FWIW) there are good reasons for seeing a specialist first. This is partly because there can be issues with things like liver function and other physical health issues (hence the need to see the endocrinologist), and partly because many of the changes that come about with hormones (especially T) are irreversible. Given that most GPs are currently barely capable of knowing to refer a patient presenting as trans to a GIC without specific instructions from that patient, I wouldn't trust them to start prescribing bridging hormones.
 
 
 
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