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To declare or not to declare a disability on a job application? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Declare or not declaring
    Declare
    7
    63.64%
    Don't declare
    4
    36.36%

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    Basically a personal dilemma I m currently experiencing; I have dyslexia and dyspraxia and deciding whether to tick that disability box is quite a difficult choice so thought I d ask fellow tsr people what they would do?
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    I do have minor hearing disability (does not affect my communication skills usually, just sometimes I need to ask someone to repeat something). I usually tick a box 'do not wish to disclose that'. I am quite certain I have never mention this in my course of work to anybody as it is not a big issue.
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    (Original post by greendragonfly)
    I do have minor hearing disability (does not affect my communication skills usually, just sometimes I need to ask someone to repeat something). I usually tick a box 'do not wish to disclose that'. I am quite certain I have never mention this in my course of work to anybody as it is not a big issue.
    Thank you for your reply I guess that's where I m unsure as it could be that it causes me no difficulties in some jobs at all but I ve always needed a little support in education.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Thank you for your reply I guess that's where I m unsure as it could be that it causes me no difficulties in some jobs at all but I ve always needed a little support in education.
    Exactly my point. I know that sometimes it can be an issue f.e.if I need to answer a phone and someone is speaking very unclear (but as I am a medical professional I usually speak with patients in person and can read from their lips a little bit). I suppose the only fair is to tick a box that indicates you may or may not have some disability. Your employer (future employer) should be aware that some people with minor disabilities just do not want to share if they know it is just a small issue usually and they know how to deal with it without support from manager etc. However if you feel like it (during the interview f.e.) you can mention that you have some small problems, but you learn how to live and work with that.
    That's my point of view, anyway
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    It's important to remember that if you don't declare, (I'm not agreeing either way) you can't whinge if they don't make reasonable adjustments. In my case, I have no choice but to declare.

    I was always told that when declaring, don't do so in a negative way. So, say something like "this helps..." I was sometimes finding that whilst at uni, I was having to educate them on what my needs were and was sometimes having to offer some alternatives. (it was something to do with coloured paper, I think)
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    (Original post by greendragonfly)
    Exactly my point. I know that sometimes it can be an issue f.e.if I need to answer a phone and someone is speaking very unclear (but as I am a medical professional I usually speak with patients in person and can read from their lips a little bit). I suppose the only fair is to tick a box that indicates you may or may not have some disability. Your employer (future employer) should be aware that some people with minor disabilities just do not want to share if they know it is just a small issue usually and they know how to deal with it without support from manager etc. However if you feel like it (during the interview f.e.) you can mention that you have some small problems, but you learn how to live and work with that.
    That's my point of view, anyway

    I guess I d feel much more comfortable disclosing at interview as I can actually explain in person then what my potential difficulties could be, if its an online application form with no space to explain anything then i d worry that they could potential discriminate in some way.

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    It's important to remember that if you don't declare, (I'm not agreeing either way) you can't whinge if they don't make reasonable adjustments. In my case, I have no choice but to declare.

    I was always told that when declaring, don't do so in a negative way. So, say something like "this helps..." I was sometimes finding that whilst at uni, I was having to educate them on what my needs were and was sometimes having to offer some alternatives. (it was something to do with coloured paper, I think)
    Of course, cant expect support if I dont tell them, but i wont know if I need it until I've started the job in most circumstances. You're right I can put a positive spin on it in that it has given me some good problem solving skills. I guess I worry a little more when i mention i m dyspraxic than being dyslexic as i've not come across that many people that have an understanding of it and if they were to google it unfortunately many resources relate to children rather than dyspraxic adults :/
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    Hmmn I think to say yes.

    They usually accomodate so they fill their disabled quota w/e

    That moment tho when they ask "what is dyspraxia" even I don't know what to say.

    Obviously your own decision tho gl x)
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    If you work with people (such as children, the eldery or disabled people) you can use it to your advantage:
    Obviously, your Dyspraxia and your symptoms is what you have and isn't the same and everyone elses. But you probably have a better idea than others in general the needs and some of the issues faced by people with the condition. So yeah, it could work in your favour.
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    If it will affect your day-to-day duties in the role then it's best to declare it.

    You'll face problems later on if you hadn't discussed this with your employer beforehand and your disability affects your work.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Basically a personal dilemma I m currently experiencing; I have dyslexia and dyspraxia and deciding whether to tick that disability box is quite a difficult choice so thought I d ask fellow tsr people what they would do?
    Where in the UK are you? Scotland/England/Wales etc
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    (Original post by apronedsamurai)
    Where in the UK are you? Scotland/England/Wales etc
    England why?
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    I declare mine as it really affects me and I sometimes need adjustments made for me.

    I am not sure if this is correct but I was told that if you have declared yourself as disabled then you are guaranteed an interview as long as you meet all the job/person specifications.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    If it will affect your day-to-day duties in the role then it's best to declare it.

    You'll face problems later on if you hadn't discussed this with your employer beforehand and your disability affects your work.
    It's difficult for me to know if it will be any detriment at all unless I ve given the job a go really but I can see the merits of declaring for sure.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    England why?
    Because rules/laws can sometimes differ between Scotland and England. Here in Scotland, a lot of public service organisations are "two tick" employers meaning that a candidate who fulfills minimum requirements will be given a guaranteed interview if they are disabled.

    Disability Equality Act 2010 covers things such as reasonable adjustments in the workplace, and would mean that if an employer did not make reasonable adjustments and or expected you to work to the same standard of competency as a worker without the same/equivalent disability/impairment that would be classed as indirect discrimination.

    Consequently then, you would have an actionable ground upon which to raise a grievance at an employment tribunal.

    By telling them from day one, you are giving them a heads up so that they can be more sensitive and understanding of any (additional) needs you have caused by, or likely to be caused by, your disabilty(s).

    In summary: tell them

    *it would appear the two ticks scheme is a UK wide policy. Its pedigree can be read here:
    https://www.gov.uk/recruitment-disab...g-applications
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    I declare mine as it really affects me and I sometimes need adjustments made for me.

    I am not sure if this is correct but I was told that if you have declared yourself as disabled then you are guaranteed an interview as long as you meet all the job/person specifications.
    I ve heard of some companies that do that.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Basically a personal dilemma I m currently experiencing; I have dyslexia and dyspraxia and deciding whether to tick that disability box is quite a difficult choice so thought I d ask fellow tsr people what they would do?
    I have a physical disability and so I declare, as I can then ask for reasonable adjustments - I work as a student full time and to fund this I work part time in retail, so I can ask for things such as chairs when on the till, etc. When declaring, I've had a fair amount of interviews and offers, so you shouldn't worry.

    Declaring it will help you in the long run as you can then ask for adjustments if you need them.
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    (Original post by apronedsamurai)
    Because rules/laws can sometimes differ between Scotland and England. Here in Scotland, a lot of public service organisations are "two tick" employers meaning that a candidate who fulfills minimum requirements will be given a guaranteed interview if they are disabled.

    Disability Equality Act 2010 covers things such as reasonable adjustments in the workplace, and would mean that if an employer did not make reasonable adjustments and or expected you to work to the same standard of competency as a worker without the same/equivalent disability/impairment that would be classed as indirect discrimination.

    Consequently then, you would have an actionable ground upon which to raise a grievance at an employment tribunal.

    By telling them from day one, you are giving them a heads up so that they can be more sensitive and understanding of any (additional) needs you have caused by, or likely to be caused by, your disabilty(s).

    In summary: tell them

    *it would appear the two ticks scheme is a UK wide policy. Its pedigree can be read here:
    https://www.gov.uk/recruitment-disab...g-applications
    Thank you Telling them appears to be the consensus. I ll certainly look into employers that are part of that two ticks scheme as it seems very beneficial
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    (Original post by celloel)
    I have a physical disability and so I declare, as I can then ask for reasonable adjustments - I work as a student full time and to fund this I work part time in retail, so I can ask for things such as chairs when on the till, etc. When declaring, I've had a fair amount of interviews and offers, so you shouldn't worry.

    Declaring it will help you in the long run as you can then ask for adjustments if you need them.
    That was my worry really, that ticking the yes box would make them think differently of me in a negative way if they don't have an awareness of what the conditions actually are but hearing your positive experiences makes me feel a lot better
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    It's difficult for me to know if it will be any detriment at all unless I ve given the job a go really but I can see the merits of declaring for sure.
    If, at the time and to the best of your knowledge you do not believe this will affect your role - then don't declare it. If anything happens in future, then update the relevant department to amend your details and allow them to provide any support/reasonable adjustment due to your disability coming up unexpectedly and unbeknownist to you.

    Alternatively you can also book off days from your allocated amount of holidays if you don't think it will happen again and don't wish to inform your employer. You could also use the time and make occasional visits to your GP to keep on top of things (medication or whatever it is you need). Many employees prefer this instead.

    I would advise you to go through the job spec and contract of employment (if you have it) and then make a careful decision. You may even wish to consult with your GP on this and their opinion.

    It's probably worth noting that some employers have a 'Guaranteed Interview Scheme' for those with disabilities.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    That was my worry really, that ticking the yes box would make them think differently of me in a negative way if they don't have an awareness of what the conditions actually are but hearing your positive experiences makes me feel a lot better
    Why don't you don't tick yes and annotate besides the box? I always annotate forms when I don't think the're taking very good measurements and think I'd prefer to give more specific/ extra info
 
 
 
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