Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

AQA A-level English Literature B new 7717/1B & 7717/2B - 15 & 22 Jun 2017 Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mughushed)
    Does anyone know for the poetry question (I'm doing Keats, not that it particular matters I expect) if we have to have an 'argument', e.g. like in DOAS where you have to argue Yes/No and come to a conclusion? For example, the specimen paper, while the mark scheme lists possible 'disagree' points for Keats, the question doesn't really set up a debate, as such. I hope that makes sense, if anyone could shed some light on my confusion I'd be very appreciative!
    Hey,

    we have been told to always set up a debate and that drives the whole essay and is your AO5 marks
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by abcdeffy)
    thank you! For GCSE we were taught to pick up and analyse features of the poem (ie. the caesura here represents this or the enjambent over here does this) - do we still do that at A Level? The impression our teacher has given is that it's more important to talk about the poem in regards to the aspects of tragedy (bit more prose-ish than a poem)
    We can, but it must be related to show meaning, i.e. don't just pick out features for the sake of it, or just pick it out and then don't talk about what it signifies
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sumaiyah101)
    Hey,

    we have been told to always set up a debate and that drives the whole essay and is your AO5 marks
    Our teacher told us after going to an examiner meeting that they dislike the 50 50 argument it doesn't mean you'll be penalised if you do a 50 50 argument. Apparently they prefer a strong one sided argument with one contradictory point that you then show the faults within that to make your argument stronger.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    How did it go today, I had practiced both the titles before.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    How many quotes per text do you all learn?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by toetothunder)
    How many quotes per text do you all learn?
    I normally learn between 50-100 short quotes per text which are easy to integrate. The majority of them will be single words which maybe occur frequently through the text.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ZRSFizzyBongs)
    I normally learn between 50-100 short quotes per text which are easy to integrate. The majority of them will be single words which maybe occur frequently through the text.
    Ahh thank you! Have you got any tips on how to revise, as I'm not quite sure how to??
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by toetothunder)
    Ahh thank you! Have you got any tips on how to revise, as I'm not quite sure how to??
    I must admit that I personally revise quite differently to other people, spider diagrams etc are difficult to memorise, instead what I often do is make lists.
    If I had to memorise a millions dates and acts for history, I would type up my textbook into note form and cross off every fact as I gradually learn it. To do so I usually look at my notes/chant them/etc and then return in a few minutes to see how many of them I can remember, then move on to the next section. If I've returned and know the facts after at least 6ish rounds then I forget about it until last minute cramming which I classify as a few hours before the exam.
    Sometimes I will pace whilst someone whose help I've enlisted asks me questions based on my notes whilst repeating in my head the answer I gave a couple of questions back. If I can't handle it, I backtrack. It's quite difficult to understand and actually do, but it's very useful for vocab and got me through my Latin GCSE beautifully.
    In terms of helping with essay plans, I'll sometimes make for/againsts +ve/-ve tables and try to memorise them, but the questions you can be asked are so diverse that in my personal opinion it's better to just memorise the content, and for English, that content are the best points you've made throughout a year of note-taking and annotations. Writing introductions to help improve the fluency of your writing is also a good skill to build during your course.
    To summarise my rant however, take notes during the year, have a summary/list/bullet points/etc of your main points ready at least a few nights before the exam and begin memorising them. Using a list/tick off system is mentally rewarding and helps you track your progress and see what is a more difficult topic which you need to return to.
    I hope at least some of that was of some use! ^U^
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ZRSFizzyBongs)
    I must admit that I personally revise quite differently to other people, spider diagrams etc are difficult to memorise, instead what I often do is make lists.
    If I had to memorise a millions dates and acts for history, I would type up my textbook into note form and cross off every fact as I gradually learn it. To do so I usually look at my notes/chant them/etc and then return in a few minutes to see how many of them I can remember, then move on to the next section. If I've returned and know the facts after at least 6ish rounds then I forget about it until last minute cramming which I classify as a few hours before the exam.
    Sometimes I will pace whilst someone whose help I've enlisted asks me questions based on my notes whilst repeating in my head the answer I gave a couple of questions back. If I can't handle it, I backtrack. It's quite difficult to understand and actually do, but it's very useful for vocab and got me through my Latin GCSE beautifully.
    In terms of helping with essay plans, I'll sometimes make for/againsts +ve/-ve tables and try to memorise them, but the questions you can be asked are so diverse that in my personal opinion it's better to just memorise the content, and for English, that content are the best points you've made throughout a year of note-taking and annotations. Writing introductions to help improve the fluency of your writing is also a good skill to build during your course.
    To summarise my rant however, take notes during the year, have a summary/list/bullet points/etc of your main points ready at least a few nights before the exam and begin memorising them. Using a list/tick off system is mentally rewarding and helps you track your progress and see what is a more difficult topic which you need to return to.
    I hope at least some of that was of some use! ^U^
    Yes that was really helpful, thank you!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi is anyone able to tell me the 2016 new spec exam question for tess of the d'urbervilles? What was the theme that needed to be spoken about because i know in the specimen paper fate was the theme?
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I did some YT videos for TGG and DOAS in the context of this specification:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjY...7bTcOLxfqBPD8g
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NimrahAhmed)
    Hi is anyone able to tell me the 2016 new spec exam question for tess of the d'urbervilles? What was the theme that needed to be spoken about because i know in the specimen paper fate was the theme?
    It was about to what extent Tess's downfall was caused by her poverty. Obviously this invites you to discuss all the aspects which caused her death before reaching a conclusion about whether her poverty was the sole cause, main cause, etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do you have a copy of the markscheme?
    (Original post by CatusStarbright)
    It was about to what extent Tess's downfall was caused by her poverty. Obviously this invites you to discuss all the aspects which caused her death before reaching a conclusion about whether her poverty was the sole cause, main cause, etc.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NimrahAhmed)
    Do you have a copy of the markscheme?
    AQA haven't published any of last years' stuff yet.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Might anyone have any questions for the crime writing lens? Perhaps from sample papers or something. I'm doing Atonement and Brighton Rock as my texts in addition to the poetry.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey everyone - how do you all revise English? I find it so difficult. Originally I was doing chapter-by chapter analysis but i got WAY too bogged down in the small details.

    Also for this AQA mark scheme, how do your teachers advise you address the AOs? Is A05 providing counter arguments/different ways of interpreting a quote or should you involve critics' opinions?

    Thanks
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cecilia.adekoya)
    Hi,

    I decided to create this thread because I haven't been able to find thread on this, seeing as it is a new syllabus. The specification is: 7716/7717 and the exam board is AQA.

    The texts I am studying at AS-Level are: Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Othello, Death of a Salesman and the AQA anthology of selected Thomas Hardy poems.

    The poems are: A Sunday Morning Tragedy, At an Inn, Tess's Lament, Under the Waterfall, Lament, Rain on a Grave, Your Last Drive, The Going, The Haunter, At Castle Boterel, A Trampwoman's Tragedy, The Frozen Greenhouse, The Forbidden Banns, The Mock Wife, The Flower's Tragedy, After a Journey and The Newcomer's Wife.
    Could we maybe update this to include A2? This is the best thread I've seen for our spec, so I reckon we should revive it to include Year 13 (especially since it's a linear qualification).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CatusStarbright)
    Could we maybe update this to include A2? This is the best thread I've seen for our spec, so I reckon we should revive it to include Year 13 (especially since it's a linear qualification).
    Yes of course we can do that. I'll rewrite the thread starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cecilia.adekoya)
    Yes of course we can do that. I'll rewrite the thread starter
    Awesome

    (Original post by cecilia.adekoya)
    At A2, the texts I am studying are: Hamlet. Atonement and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Also, we are learning a unit called 'Elements of Crime Writing'.

    In the two papers, the first paper is for Othello (whole text and extract) and a comparison between Tess of the d'Urbervilles and Death of a Salesman. In paper two, there is an unseen extract from a crime text which we analyse, using what was learnt in the unit. Section B and C are based on Hamlet, Atonement and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. For Section B, our class has been told to answer the question using Hamlet, so that it becomes a whole text question. However, for section C, we answer a question comparing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Atonement.

    What about you? Is there anything that's the same or different?
    We're doing the political and social protest side of the spec instead for A2, so I'm studying The Kite Runner, The Handmaid's Tale and Songs of Innocence and of Experience ((a) poem collection(s) by William Blake). We have the same tragedy texts

    For paper 2 we can make our own choice as to which we use for the whole text question and which we used for the comparison, so it'll depend on which text will best go together for the Section C question and the one left over will be used for the whole text. That's my strategy anyway.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Have you ever participated in a Secret Santa?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    OMAM

    Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

    Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

    Notes

    Revision Hub

    All our revision materials in one place

    Love books

    Common grammar and vocabulary problems

    Get your questions asked and answered

    Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.