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    Soo this is going to be pretty long but I really need some advice!

    I am in the final year of my law degree and unfortunately I won't be able to graduate with a 2.1 overall (due to various reasons I won't go into detail).
    However I have always wanted to do the LPC, get a training contract and become a solicitor. After finding out my overall will be a 2.2. I didn't let that hold me back to not wanting to do the LPC. I also see lpc as a extra qualification and if I can do really well in it then hopefully employers will take that into consideration.

    So I've been doing work experience in this small high st firm for about a year now and they have offered me a training contract but on the condition that I do the LPC part time over 2 years, while working as a paralegal then starting my training contract. I've always wanted to do full time LPC and get it over and done with! But this seems like a really good opportunity as they have offered me a training contract.
    The downside or the thing that I am worried about is that whether or not I will be able to juggle part time lpc and full time work? If I do part time I would prefer to do the two evenings option at BPP.
    Also I don't think I will be getting any study leave from the firm. So obviously I will have to take annual leave to revise etc for the exams. But I've always been used to having weeks to prepare for my exam and I won't have that much time to revise for lpc then. And also I'm not exactly sure how BPP's part time lpc examinations work, in terms of how many I will have because that will also determine how much time I will need off to revise.

    I am just really confused. It seems like a really good opportunity considering I am a 2.2 student so it will already be a hell of alot difficult for me to get a training contract and a opportunity has just come up. But I am just worried if I will be able to juggle the workload for lpc whilst working full time and if my annual leave will be enough for revising for exams.

    If anyone who has done part time lpc and full time work can help me and give me some advice on how it is, and whether its do-able or not, it will be great! Any advice at all will be great!!
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    I undertook the LPC full time so I can't give you any personal experience, however I know of a number of people who have done the LPC part time whilst working and have managed with it.

    Without being disrespectful, obtaining a TC with a 2.2 is incredibly hard and therefore it would be madness to turn it down on the basis that you may have a difficult time juggling both the LPC and working full time. The LPC is easy anyway (did mine at the College (now Uni) of Law) and I managed to work a couple of days a week, do the course full time and still have lots of free time.

    Final bit of advice - Depending on how much you trust your current firm, just make sure that they're not going to string you along for ~2 years to then tell you that ''due to market conditions and unpredictable legal reforms'' they can no longer offer you a training contract.
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    I undertook the LPC full time so I can't give you any personal experience, however I know of a number of people who have done the LPC part time whilst working and have managed with it.

    Without being disrespectful, obtaining a TC with a 2.2 is incredibly hard and therefore it would be madness to turn it down on the basis that you may have a difficult time juggling both the LPC and working full time. The LPC is easy anyway (did mine at the College (now Uni) of Law) and I managed to work a couple of days a week, do the course full time and still have lots of free time.

    Final bit of advice - Depending on how much you trust your current firm, just make sure that they're not going to string you along for ~2 years to then tell you that ''due to market conditions and unpredictable legal reforms'' they can no longer offer you a training contract.



    Hi thanks for the reply. I am leaning towards taking the offer. However I do want to ask how are the exams during lpc? Are they like undergraduate exams where you need weeks of revision? Because I want to know if annual leave from work will be sufficient to revise for lpc exams?

    And how are the assessments like in stage 1? Is it more exam or coursework based? I understand you went UOL so it may have been different but I just want a rough idea.

    Thanks!!
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    The exams at UoL (at least when I was there in 2012/13), were relatively easy. I finished with a distinction and I would say that I spent approximately 5 full days of revision for each subject prior to the exam. Depending on whether you took time off to revise etc., you would have enough time to fit in preparation prior to the exam.

    I'm not entirely sure what you mean by stage 1? Perhaps this is something exclusive to BPP and/or the part-time schedule. From my memory of UoL, the vast majority of assessments were exam based.

    Think of it this way. This may be your only offer of a TC. If you turn it down then you're unlikely to obtain another offer from either the firm you're currently at or another firm (as harsh as that may sound). - In other words, grab that TC with both hands and rough it out until you've finish the LPC. In any event, the exams take up only a small section of the calendar year so you'll be fine for the majority of the time!
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    Thanks for the reply!

    I meant stage 1 as in the first half of the course where you do all the core modules (the second half/stage 2 is electives right) But yh perhaps it is exclusive to BPP to phrase it like that.

    Also am curious to find out why you found the LPC easy or what part you found easy, because ALOT of people say that it is difficult and that the degree is a walk in the park compared to the LPC. But I guess everyone has different opinions and experiences.
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    (Original post by a.ch)
    Thanks for the reply!

    I meant stage 1 as in the first half of the course where you do all the core modules (the second half/stage 2 is electives right) But yh perhaps it is exclusive to BPP to phrase it like that.

    Also am curious to find out why you found the LPC easy or what part you found easy, because ALOT of people say that it is difficult and that the degree is a walk in the park compared to the LPC. But I guess everyone has different opinions and experiences.
    I recall that the 'core' modules were a bit more difficult than the electives, however nothing to get worked up over. I also recall it being the general consensus that the LPC was easier than the degree, although everyone is different I suppose.

    Perhaps the fact that with the LPC you were able to bring your books/notes into the exam (UoL) and therefore you didn't have to learn everything off by heart. Is it too late to switch from BPP to UoL?

    In any event, you have two options:

    1) Work full time at your current firm whilst undertaking the LPC part-time. Have (at the worst) 2 hard years but then walk into your TC.
    2) Quit your current job. Do the LPC full time and then look for a TC with a 2.2 degree on your CV.

    I would take option 1 every day of the week.
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    I recall that the 'core' modules were a bit more difficult than the electives, however nothing to get worked up over. I also recall it being the general consensus that the LPC was easier than the degree, although everyone is different I suppose.

    Perhaps the fact that with the LPC you were able to bring your books/notes into the exam (UoL) and therefore you didn't have to learn everything off by heart. Is it too late to switch from BPP to UoL?

    In any event, you have two options:

    1) Work full time at your current firm whilst undertaking the LPC part-time. Have (at the worst) 2 hard years but then walk into your TC.
    2) Quit your current job. Do the LPC full time and then look for a TC with a 2.2 degree on your CV.

    I would take option 1 every day of the week.

    I haven't applied to any yet but UOL was always an option although I am more interested in doing it at BPP.
    I thought the fact that its open would make it difficult in the sense that they would expect more from you because your notes are with you. Were all the exams open book?
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    I would go for UoL if I was you (presuming that there isn't much of a price difference between them and BPP). There is no difference in terms of reputation and, as you'll eventually find out, the LPC is largely a waste of time so the provider doesn't make much of a difference.

    As to whether they expect more from you at UoL due to being able to bring your books in, I don't know. However, I seem to recall hearing about people doing their exams at BPP and struggling due to the fact that it wasn't open book.

    Whatever floats your boat though. Personally, the open book exams were much easier than my degree exams where you weren't allowed any materials.

    Oh, and all of the exams were open book, yes.
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    UoL is no longer open book.
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    Im at BPP part time evening. Its hard. very hard. But like you, I don't have the option of doing it full time. I've somehow managed to get from September to now, and it has flown. In a year I'll be finished. The exams are quite regular so you won't have them all at once if that makes sense. I had 2 skills in Nov, a skills exam and Business law in Jan, 2 skills in march, another 2 skills tomorrow (Yes- TOMORROW and im procrastinating!) and one in May.

    It is difficult sometimes but BPP are good at helping part time students managed.
    Without being disrespectful, to get a TC with a 2:2 and no LPC (yet) is a great achievement and I wouldn't turn it down for the sake of 2 years hard work. The LPC level 1 goes through the summer so you wont have time for a holiday anyway, and if youre really desperate for study leave, most firms will give you it unpaid. I'd go for it x
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    Well I'll get shot down but I have no found the lpc Easy. It's not closed book and it's a lot of work. However as others have said getting a tc is really tough the fact you w been offered one I would say go for it. Your be doing it over 2 years so I think your be ok I've found it a lot of work but I'm doing it over 9 months whilst working part time. Good luck with it I hope it goes ok and you secure the Tc
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    Hi Im thinking of doing the LPC at the Uni of Law full time, how many contact hours/days were you required to actually be there? i live quite far away from where i'm planning on doing mine. thanks
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    I undertook the LPC full time so I can't give you any personal experience, however I know of a number of people who have done the LPC part time whilst working and have managed with it.

    Without being disrespectful, obtaining a TC with a 2.2 is incredibly hard and therefore it would be madness to turn it down on the basis that you may have a difficult time juggling both the LPC and working full time. The LPC is easy anyway (did mine at the College (now Uni) of Law) and I managed to work a couple of days a week, do the course full time and still have lots of free time.

    Final bit of advice - Depending on how much you trust your current firm, just make sure that they're not going to string you along for ~2 years to then tell you that ''due to market conditions and unpredictable legal reforms'' they can no longer offer you a training contract.

    Hi Im thinking of doing the LPC at the Uni of Law full time, how many contact hours/days were you required to actually be there? i live quite far away from where i'm planning on doing mine. thanks
 
 
 
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