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Should tackling in Rugby be banned in schools? Watch

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    (Original post by whorace)
    Lol ok nothing wrong with gays or Mongolians (and actually Mongols are very manly, horse riding is very common and the Mongols hold the title of largest land empire in history). It's the feminists because they emasculate everything with rubbish health and safety standards
    It wasn't a feminist group that presented the proposal but I agree there are areas where over-feminisation can cause problems. In the grand scheme of things I think two minutes walking down any high street in Britain would prove that testosterone is a far bigger problem. Back to tackling in Rugby though, it surely isn't a mad proposal top prptect small kids from concussions?
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    (Original post by Damien96)
    It wasn't a feminist group that presented the proposal but I agree there are areas where over-feminisation can cause problems. In the grand scheme of things I think two minutes walking down any high street in Britain would prove that testosterone is a far bigger problem. Back to tackling in Rugby though, it surely isn't a mad proposal top prptect small kids from concussions?
    Who will protect them when they grow up? We need to be aware that all this does is create dependence and stops people from learning necessary survival skills, sometimes life tackles you and you hurt your head, get on top of it or it'll get on top of you.
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    yeah, about 0.000000000001% healthier
    why would I care about being 0.000000000000001% healthier when I could be learning about something that is necessary? like I said in another post, kids in school should be learning about politics - the turnout rates would be higher if these kids in school grew up knowing *exactly* what the heck they were voting for
    Why do you think it matters what you care about as a child? Grown-ups are deciding what's best for you.

    There are a couple of points here. The first is that education is not limited to academia. I've mentioned getting kids into team sports, which is a very valuable part of their schooling both at the time and in the long term. The second is that you're assuming that an extra hour of study would increase children's overall productivity. I'd suggest that taking an hour out to work on something non-academic is likely to make kids more productive overall.

    There's a point at which I agree with you, and that's when you enter sixth form. At that point you're closer to adulthood and the focus of your schooling becomes more purely academic. Before that, though, you're a child, and health and lifestyle education and general character development is important.
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    Sport or some sort of physical activity should be compulsory at any school. Fact
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    Why should kids be learning about politics? You'll say it's important because they decide all of the decisions in the country, indeed that is important, but your MP will be deciding most of the decisions anyway, and let's be honest politics is mostly feeling not fact. The last thing this country needs is a bunch of politically unstable Marxist wannabes with no real life experience.
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    (Original post by whorace)
    Who will protect them when they grow up? We need to be aware that all this does is create dependence and stops people from learning necessary survival skills, sometimes life tackles you and you hurt your head, get on top of it or it'll get on top of you.
    I agree there is some worth in some of the things you are saying but we are not all alpha males thank ****. Just because you might enjoy bashing your skull against another doesn't mean it's for everyone. Not all mental barriers are best served with violence or proxy violence.
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    As long as the sport isn't compulsory, then it's fine. Parents should have to sign some kind off a permission slip though.
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    I think they should have touch rugby and introduce tackling when the school kids can demonstrate the correct technique and demonstrate they know how to minimise risk of injury, maybe through taught safety sessions and a certificate or something.

    I also think that girls should be taught rugby and football, I would have loved to play rugby in PE but I was only taught ****ing hockey and soppy netball !
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    (Original post by indigofox)
    I think they should have touch rugby and introduce tackling when the school kids can demonstrate the correct technique and demonstrate they know how to minimise risk of injury, maybe through taught safety sessions and a certificate or something.

    I also think that girls should be taught rugby and football, I would have loved to play rugby in PE but I was only taught ****ing hockey and soppy netball !
    I think yours is the best answer so far. That makes sense to me, although I'm not a teacher or coach so maybe I'm entirely wrong.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    Another nail in the coffin of the U.K. school experience, which has been going downhill since schools started banning British Bulldog. There's nothing like spear tackling your friends on concrete playgrounds.
    Ahh, those were the days.

    Thing is it's more of choice what you do on the playground. Being forced to play rugby in the rain and cold isn't exactly fun. I don't see the reason to ban it for those that want to do it though.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Ahh, those were the days.

    Thing is it's more of choice what you do on the playground. Being forced to play rugby in the rain and cold isn't exactly fun. I don't see the reason to ban it for those that want to do it though.
    I certainly wouldn't ban the sport but tackling at a younger age?
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    (Original post by Damien96)
    I think yours is the best answer so far. That makes sense to me, although I'm not a teacher or coach so maybe I'm entirely wrong.
    I'm not either but it might get the kids and teachers to think about safety a little more with it being a contact sport. You can get lifelong injuries playing any sport though, I've known several at school who have had their teeth knocked out playing hockey and saw a girl break her arm (nasty open fracture) on a trampoline.
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    Yes, especially at secondary schools. It's ridiculous that two kids, with one literally twice the size of the other can be put on the same rugby field.
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    (Original post by whorace)
    Why should kids be learning about politics? You'll say it's important because they decide all of the decisions in the country, indeed that is important, but your MP will be deciding most of the decisions anyway, and let's be honest politics is mostly feeling not fact. The last thing this country needs is a bunch of politically unstable Marxist wannabes with no real life experience.
    We wouldn't want the riff raff becoming an MP or having any kind of political awareness. MPs do not run the entire world either you may have noticed. Quite a lot of human activity goes one without the interference of MPs. Teaching me science helped morph me into what my political views are today anyway.Teaching my about how feudalist societies worked in history made me more aware of and recognition of what class is. Politics seeps into everything you might be shocked to know. What's just as important is teaching facts is teaching people how to think, how to think criticality and giving them access to different strains of thought. Then let them make their own mind up.

    Most people do not become scientists, and even those who do are very specialised in their area of expertise. That does not mean we can just scrap teaching scientific method and scientific facts to children, it's incredibly important.


    I fundamentally disagree that education is just about teaching the plebs what they are going to directly need in their adult life to fulfil their daily existence for what others have planned for them.

    I have no idea what you mean by politically unstable.


    Back to rugby. Being rugby tackled by someone has only raison at high school. In the adult world it is rather frowned upon to tackle someone. Never needed protection from it. IT's also normal to go to the police to sort out crime rather than getting my ice axe and dishing out some vigilante justice. It would appear the Marxists haver already won.

    (Original post by Damien96)
    I certainly wouldn't ban the sport but tackling at a younger age?
    I don't think you can make hard fast rules to police what children do. Sure, don;t play tackle rugby at primary school but we used to play things like British bulldog me and my friends. I ended up slipping and badly hurting my knee a few times. It's just growing up. Running and falling over is something children do.
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    If you ban tackling... Well, then rugby isn't rugby anymore.

    This country needs to get a grip on the difference between health and safety and fun.

    My best friend broke our friend's leg... By playing full-contact... He was in a cast for six weeks, got up and went straight back to playing again... If you don't want the contact in the sport, then don't play...
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    Just make rugby non-compulsory where it currently is. Artificial selection will handle the rest.
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    whorace, I found some Marxism :eek3:

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    Hell no. If tackling is taught properly, then it should very rarely result in injuries. I loved tackling, and getting tackled. It was the best part of the game for me. Sure it might not always be pleasant, and you can get injured, but the whole point of rugby is enduring pain and hardship, working as a team to get a result. Yes there is risk, but there is risk in everything in life.

    There is a maybe more an argument to make scrums uncontested at under 16, but even then scrums are fine so long as everyone knows how to properly perform one.

    By far the most dangerous part of a rugby match, at least in my experience, were mauls.
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    (Original post by Damien96)
    No I am not saying that, why would you think I was?

    Are you saying exercise is not important or habit forming?
    The major arguments against PE are the sheer amount of time that it takes which could be used for useful subjects and that it puts children off doing sport, leading them to become unhealthy.
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    Never played rugby in my entire life before joining this grammar school, best fun I've had in years. Feminists are trying to ruin the goddamn sport of the commonwealth. What happened to the great tough men of yonder!

    Seriously though, how many sports are dangerous, we don't go around banning them do we.
 
 
 
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