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University Mental Health Day 2016! Watch

  • View Poll Results: Have you ever accessed the mental health support at university?
    Yes
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    20.90%
    No
    204
    50.75%
    I didn't know it existed
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    28.36%

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    So it's University Mental Health Day tomorrow (if you're reading this on Wednesday) or today (if you're reading this on Thursday)

    It was started by the University Mental Health Advisers Network (UMHAN) in 2012 with the aims of raising awareness of some of the challenges students face whilst coming to university and hopes to change the state of mental health services at university!

    Myself and other TSR users have kindly shared their own stories of living with a mental illness at university and their own experiences of the support they've accessed:

    Pathway's story
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    My university have been great actually. I was already known to student support due to my physical disability, but my disability adviser had known for some time that I was struggling a lot - having panic attacks, not sleeping, not turning up to classes/lectures, etc. (I was undiagnosed prior to ~March 2015). She was one of the main people who noticed my rapid deterioration in mental health along with the disability liaison officer for my department.

    In January 2015 (spring term of my second year), I turned up in student support having a breakdown (due to my then undiagnosed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) getting particularly bad) and was able to see someone straight away (they were on-call). I was referred to counselling. They said that the wait may be up to two weeks to get an assessment, but due to how unwell I was at the time, I had my application fast-tracked and was able to get an assessment on the following Monday. I then had to wait to be assigned a counsellor (I was told that due to the amount of people needing counselling this might take up to four weeks), however, this didn't take long at all! My first counselling session started a week after the assessment - essentially, I had waited less than 2 weeks to get help from my university's counselling service. At the time it felt like an eternity, but I had help from my department, student support and the on campus Nightline (we have a Nightline flat you can go to, a number to call and an email) and got through it. Counselling helped me a great deal and was a great bit of support between then and starting therapy with a clinical psychologist in the local community mental health team (CMHT). During the counselling, we talked a lot about what brought me there, how to cope with being unwell and dealing with university. All in all, she really helped me through it. I ended up having 16 weeks of counselling when people usually only get 6 weeks.


    I already had a great deal of support due to my physical disability from both the university and from DSA (e.g. on campus accommodation; extended deadlines; extended short-loans in the library; individual exam arrangements (IEA's) (own room, use of a computer, extra time, etc); software to help with proofreading, mindmapping etc.). A lot of this is available to people with only mental health issues as well.
    When I got my mental health diagnoses (PTSD, depression and anxiety), I had my DSA "topped-up" (suggested by my disability adviser) and they added a specialist mental health mentor. The process itself was easy (I didn't need to be re-assessed or anything), but my mentoring didn't start until the new academic year (my top-up only went through at the tail-end of second year, so there was no point starting then).
    When I initally applied for DSA before my first year started, my university were very informative - despite me not putting them as my firm choice (they were my insurance...), I was helped a lot and during a UCAS day I was able to speak to a disability adviser who explained the process of applying to DSA. The DSA assessment itself was really relaxed from what I remember; he just asked me a lot of different questions relating to study needs (e.g. memory, motivation, etc.) and then suggested something to help with any issues. I took my mum a long with me to the assessment and some paper work relating to my physical disability - I'm pretty sure that the process is the same for both physical disabilities and mental health issues (from what people have told me!). The assessors are always really easy to talk to, so there's no need to be afraid or anxious, and they have this knack of knowing what may (or may not) be helpful to someone with your condition/s.

    Anyway, my mentor has been amazing, despite me only having access to this support since the start of my final year at university (October, 2015), it has helped me a great deal! I am even on track for a first. She helps me with a variety of different things, such as time management, motivation, as well as helping me deal with my diagnoses and just being there to talk to when things are particularly bad. Additionally, she's supporting me with my application to do a masters! Given how bad things were at the start of the year (one of my best friends passed away during the summer and my mum also got diagnosed with cancer, I was not in a good place at all), I'm quite surprised I didn't drop out. I know for a fact I probably would have had I not had the support of my mentor! They are truly valuable resources.

    My advice to someone going to university (or who is already at university) is that: if you feel you may have a mental health issue and it's impacting you to the point that it's affecting your ability to study, you need to talk to someone. Whether it's a parent, teacher, someone in student support, whoever - you need to talk to someone. They will (and should!) take you seriously, and will be able to offer you the appropriate level of support. Never feel ashamed. Had I been open about my mental health when I first became unwell (which was when I was a young kid, according to my psych.), maybe I wouldn't be so ill now! I'm glad I made the decision to speak up about it though; my university have helped me so much and I'm grateful for it.

    Counselling and mentoring are both really good sources of support and most universities should offer counselling now. Mentoring may be more difficult to have access to as you need a mental health diagnosis to have access to one (usually) as it comes from DSA, but it's always a possibility too if you decide to go down the DSA route. Moreover, if you need any IEA's then most universities require you to go through DSA for the funding - if you're struggling with your mental health, especially during exams, please speak to your student support team! They are there to help and want you to succeed.

    Really, it's all about communication. It may be scary but it is worth it in the end. Generally, people are a lot more progressive these days and universities are a lot more aware of the amount of mental health issues that can affect students and are doing more to help. Take advantage of the help and don't let yourself suffer, do something about it!


    Deyesy's story
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    My university have been nothing but fantastic with my mental illness. I was diagnosed with depression in the early autumn of 2012; with my university life starting in September 2013. I was first hesitant about declaring it on my UCAS application but do not regret it in the slightest; my university (Manchester Metropolitan University) were quick to follow it up once I’d received an offer from themselves.

    I was contacted by what was the ‘Learner Development Service’ – now the ‘Disability Service’ who quickly put plans in place for extra support in time for September 2013. A Personal Learners Plan (PLP) was made and this gave me access to things such as extra time on library loans, extended deadlines, the permission to record lectures and any exams that would be usually taken in a large hall would now be in a much smaller room. Just knowing that the support is ‘there’ if I need it has helped a lot with my mental health.
    My university’s counselling service have been nothing but fantastic too – they’ve taken on board the level of support I want from them; I see them once a month to just give them an update and it definitely does help knowing you’ve got others looking out for you. I’d recommend to anyone reading this if they’re struggling to reach out to theirs!

    I also receive Disabled Students Allowance; the LDS helped me with the application and it was a really, really easy process! Unlike Student Finance – which is means tested; DSA isn’t! I received a free laptop; free Dictaphone (so I could record lectures if my mental health was playing up and I wasn’t in the right place to be making notes) and a free printer. I get also get photocopying, ink cartridges and my internet costs covered too! It’s honestly brilliant

    My advice to those out there to people thinking of reaching out to the support available to them is; Don’t be afraid! Help is out there if you look and ask for it and it can really, really make the world of difference to your university life!


    TLG - Suffering from poor mental health at Oxbridge? Read on!

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    My story

    I recently read a statistic that absolutely appalled me: apparently 1 in 8 university students (or perhaps it was just undergraduates) have considered ending their lives during their university studies. I was horrified.

    Perhaps it appalled me so much because I could (a) totally believe this, and (b) totally identify with it. As many of you know, I read my undergraduate degree at the University of Oxford. Within 2 weeks of starting my first term there, I was hugely overwhelmed by the social side but by the academic side especially. Everyone knows that an Oxbridge degree is difficult but until/unless you're actually THERE, it is impossible to conceive of what that actually means or feels like. Even having an older sister who had studied her undergrad at Oxford hadn't prepared me for the sheer intensity of the undergrad lifestyle and experience.

    I felt troubled on many levels. My inferiority complex about having missed my grades was heightened by a fellow music student claiming that I didn't deserve to be at Oxford.(This same person was bullying me and made many slurs against me, including to do with my background and my ethnicity.)In addition to this, it had become very quickly apparent that both my schooling and my own interests in music had been inadequate, in terms of preparing me well enough to study at Oxbridge.The workload was huge and felt insurmountable. I was also very aware that I was behind my tutorial partners in terms of knowledge and abilities.
    Within 2 weeks of starting, it was looking like an attractive option. I felt that I couldn't leave Oxford - my family and secondary school would be so disappointed, and my friends wouldn't understand. It felt very much like "do or die trying".

    I decided to fight - I decided to "do" rather than "die trying" - but it was a real struggle. For 2 years I battled alone with my perceived inadequacies/failings. Over time, as I built up a solid friendship circle, the negative thoughts. One tutor was vaguely aware that I was unhappy and insecure, but did not know the extent of how troubled I was. That tutor then moved at the end of my second year to a different Oxford college. I felt alone and powerless.

    I decided - finally - that extra support was needed. Having been newly diagnosed with depression and anxiety by a psychiatrist in Sri Lanka (my country of origin), I began engaging with college welfare staff. Sadly, despite their best efforts, things got much worse and I ended up attempting to drown myself in the middle of my Finals (end of degree exams). As a result, I left Oxford with a 2.2 classification and felt more worthless and confused than when I had started.

    Moral of the story

    Why am I telling you TSR peeps all of this? Hopefully by telling these bits of my story, you can see that I should - and indeed, could - have got help much more early on in my degree, both from tutors and my peers. It wasn't for lack of help available - for all their faults, Oxford and Cambridge probably have the most welfare support available to students, plus the tutorial/supervision systems mean that problems often get detected much earlier than they would in a university with far less contact hours/one-to-one tuition provision.

    The fact is that there is a plethora of welfare support available at Oxford and Cambridge, from the SU (they may appear inactive but they are there and are incredibly helpful, resourceful and supportive) to your college tutor/DoS, and more generally the college welfare. Each university also has its own disability service for those experiencing mental health difficulties, alongside other disabilities. (It may sound obvious but it's worth emphasising that mental health difficulties ARE a disability and count as a protected characteristic in the Equality Act 2010. So you should never feel uncomfortable or anything like that about approaching the disability services.) The support networks are definitely there but you HAVE to be proactive in accessing them. Don't leave it late like I did - it may cost you your life!

    So don't suffer in silence: get the help you both need and deserve! Many people thrive at Oxbridge but many people (even amongst those who thrive) will be suffering from mental health difficulties, be it sporadic or long-term, or diagnosed or undiagnosed. This is as true of the staff as it is the students! This is as true of the staff as it is the students! We have the lowest drop-out rate but are amongst the highest - if not having THE highest - rates of ending their own lives Don't be a statistic who can no longer make positive changes - seek help. If the first person you approach is no good, then go round everyone you can find. If you can't find anyone, complain to the SU about welfare provision in your college.

    You have the power to make a difference not only to yourself, but to others. Hang on in there and remember, things CAN get better


    bullettheory's story
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    I studied Mathematics & Computer Science at one university for a year before I dropped out due to my mental illness. I went back to university 3 years ago and I'm currently in my second year of a Social Work degree. I am diagnosed with Schizoaffective Disorder and Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder.

    - How have your university been in general about your mental illness? Have they put extra support in place with deadlines etc?

    Both of the universities I attended have been very support of my mental illness. Before my first day at the university I got in contact with the disability service who helped by arranging my support that was detailed in my Disabled Student Allowance (DSA) assessment and also liaised with my faculty so they were aware of my illness and support needs. I had a few periods of becoming unwell and spending time in hospital whilst at university, and they were always very supportive. My tutor would let my lecturers know and they would arrange extensions if needed. A couple of times I would have catch up sessions if needed, and my lecturers were more than happy to help explain anything I missed and was unclear on. I had to take 2 separate years out during my time at university, and the university and my tutor would help me with the process and discuss the break with me, ensuring that it was the right step. I always felt very supported.

    - You mentioned you've had university counselling? How's that been?

    I accessed my university's counselling service when I was at my first university. I went in my first week and had an assessment the next week. After the assessment I had my first session a week later which was perfect as I was really struggling. The counselling service was a life saver and they were great with me - I ended up getting a lot more sessions than planned until the local mental health team were in a position to take over my care and they even arranged a care plan meeting with them at the university. A few times they had to break confidentiality as I was at risk, but they always did this in a supportive way and would take me to my GP surgery and wait with me. I couldn't fault them.

    - Have you ever reached out to services outside of university which provide support such as Nightline, the Samaritans etc?

    I accessed the local mental health team and crisis team quite a lot, and I did spend some stints in hospital. I also used A&E if things were really bad. I did use the Samaritans and Nightline a few times if I just needed to talk to someone, and I always found their service supportive. At the moment I see a psychotherapist and my mental health team, which helps me manage my mental health.

    - You also talked about how you receive Disabled Students Allowance? How did you find the process, was it easy etc? What types of support have you received from them?

    The process of applying for DSA was very easy and I got a lot more support than I was expecting! If you are thinking about applying but are not sure, definitely go for it! I got a laptop, computer equipment, a dictaphone, mentoring support and a notetaker. The mentoring and notetaking is by far the most important and best support I have, and without them, I would really struggle when I am unwell at university. My mentor is a godsend, and helps me with so much - academic work, managing stress, managing my health and also just being there if I need to offload!

    What was the process of occupational health like?

    As I am studying social work and we go on placement where we work with vulnerable people, we have to go through occupational health which ensures that we are fit to work with these service users. I filled in a form before I started the course and I had an initial appointment. I continue to see occupational health regularly, as well as when there are concerns about my health, and after any absence. We talk about how I am currently doing with my mental health, my treatment, my diagnosis, how I am managing with the work at university and on placement as well as any stressors in my work life or personal life. It can be a daunting process, but I would encourage anyone to be open and honest about your health - there is no point anything as it is likely they will find out anyway (plus, lying would be extremely un-ethical!) There has been periods where they have told me I need to take some time away from university or placement, but this has always been done sensitively and supportively. They are not out to stop you from being on your course, they just want to make sure it is right for you at the moment, that you can handle it, and that you aren't going to endanger any vulnerable people by being unwell - and they will look for adjustments if needed. Please don't worry, having mental health problems or a history of being sectioned won't stop you from passing OH, as long as you are okay at the moment!

    - Finally what advice would you give to people thinking about reaching out to the support available to them at university?


    - Apply for DSA ASAP!!!
    - If you are starting to feel the pressure, or are feeling mentally unwell, go and talk to someone at your counselling service or your GP, they are there to help and are very used to mental health problems.
    - If you are worried about confidentiality, remember that EVERYTHING is confidential, unless you are a major risk to yourself or others, but even then, they will talk to you about this at the time.
    - Talking about self harm or ending your life, is very unlikely to result in you being sectioned just like that! Many people go through these issues and the best thing to do is to talk to someone - counselling, GP, A&E or even just phoning the Samaritans or Nightline!
    - If you are starting to feel unwell, remember that drinking loads, getting high, going out clubbing every night, not getting much sleep or avoiding how you feel is unlikely to help. Sometimes a good nights sleep or just avoiding the booze or drugs for a bit can do wonders!
    - Finally, like I've already said, just talk to anyone, anyone who you feel comfortable with - your mental health is very very important!


    As part of this I also wanted to provide a 'Top Ten Tips' for surviving university and so in no pariticular order here they are!

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    1) Let university members of staff know before and during your studies if it's being affect by your mental health. They can really help and be accommodating for exams/extensions etc.

    2) Sometimes it's good to take time to step back from study, going out and all crazy uni shenanigans and just reflect on how much you've achieved and where you're going.

    3) Make sure you're getting fresh air every day, even if it's a simple walk around the block or to go and see a friend in another building. Being cooped up in your room all day is a recipe for disaster.

    4) Don't be afraid to seek help! There's support out there; '“Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.” Turning on the light could be something as simple as letting a friend know you're not doing too well or seeing your personal tutor!

    5) Make sure you have at least half an hour each day (ideally more if possible?) where you take some time away from both uni work AND social media, and just do something you enjoy that doesn't involve a computer/laptop/iPad/smartphone. This can be as simple as going to a coffee shop or reading a non-academic book!

    6) Every uni has a student support/counselling service. It's free at the point of delivery, but everyone pays for it as part of their tuition fees. Don't ever think "I don't deserve it" - you're paying for it so you're fully entitled to use it. It's a service/facility available to you, just like any other the uni provides.

    7) Look into Disabled Students Allowance, it can cover useful equipment but also a support worker and make recommendations for your tutors – such as deadline extensions and flexible library loans

    8) Be aware of the effect alcohol can have on your mood! Alcohol is actually a depressant which means drinking can make you feel in down in the dumps.

    9) Organising can help you survive university; prioritising deadlines; focusing on a single thing and getting it done before moving onto the next deadline instead of trying to focus your energy across multiple deadlines.

    10) Remember getting the right amount of sleep can also make a huge amount of difference! As students; we're very guilty of pulling the odd all nighter to get those deadlines done, just remember not to make this a regular occurance ^^


    There's also plenty of support out there and this includes Disabled Students Allowance which can help provide things such as 'specialist equipment, eg a computer if you need one because of your disability' to non-medical helpers.

    Nightline who are a student run listening service run by students. They have 5 core values and they are; confidentiality, anonymity, being non-judgmental, being non-directive (this means they let you control where you want the conversation to go) and non-advisory - they won't provide advice but let you come to your own decisions.

    Student Minds who are the UK's only student led mental health charity. They run support groups across the country and campaigns to raise awareness of the current state of student mental health.

    All universities should also provide a free counselling service - this information is something you could ring/e-mail your Nightline to provide you as they can give information!

    What are your experiences living with a mental health condition at university and what are your top tips for surviving uni?
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    My university experience with mental health has been...interesting, to say the least.

    My current diagnosis partly doesn't actually have a name. It's a mix of cluster A and B personality disorder traits, dysthymia, and dissociative symptoms. While I have bi-weekly meetings with Disability Services, whether or not they are helpful are up for debate. Neither through such meetings or my NHS meetings have I been taught any coping techniques or the like. While I can talk to them and get stuff off my chest for a brief while, like I said, it's brief. It doesn't last.

    I have DSA, which is great: my own laptop, a fancy Livescribe pen, and a printer, with an allowance for all the pads and ink etc. I have Read and Write too, which I have just discovered has an extension for Chrome (the essay reading I need to do online now becomes much easier ). I also have arrangements for exams: rest breaks and a smaller room, but already I have been shown that such arrangements aren't read through properly - I was lumped into a room with the extra time people for a Film Studies exam, and the assessors assumed that I had extra time. Great. :rolleyes:

    However, it is the academic side of things that have let down my mental health services at uni. While lectures aren't compulsory, that's fine, I can skip those if I am feeling unwell. However, tutorials and seminars are compulsory and at my uni you have to fill out a form if you miss one -and give a reason. I have missed a few due to my health and have had to fill out such forms: there is no sympathy given really if you miss a tutorial due to mental health. The forms are handed into the School reception and the receptionist reads them in front of you! I have received some very curious, sometimes insulting looks when they read about me hearing voices or struggling badly. It's as if they don't believe me because I have managed to make it to hand in the form.

    On top of that, the two Schools I am associated with (Humanities and Social Sciences) don't have extensions for essays: you have to hand in the essay late, be penalised, submit a mitigating circumstances form (with evidence), and then wait a few months until a committee decides whether or not the penalties should be lifted. That's extremely stressful and while I understand why they have such a policy in place, I still believe it is incredibly unfair in some aspects.

    So overall, ups and downs for me - and I still have another 2 years to go!
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    Great thread!
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    Woop woop for the thread

    Will try and contribute more if my laptop ever decides to behave :eek:

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    This thread and the stories are so moving

    I asked some unis to get involved and share their services and explain how they support student minds on campus, it's in the UCAS forum here:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post63156953
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    One thing I seriously do not recommend is going the whole thing alone. I did this. I didn't know where to turn and my experience with GPs and mental health services previously was absolutely awful, which put me off getting help. I spent the whole of my second term pretending I was absolutely fine. (I'm sure we've all done that)

    I was living away from home. Because I have such a rare surname, (we've come to the conclusion that if you spell your surname the way we do, you're a relative!) a friend of mine decided that the only option was to contact who he thought my dad via Facebook. I was not pleased at all. I found out (from my friend, not dad, thankfully) he did this 5 days later.

    Predictably, I failed one module, scraped 2 passes on another and only did really well on the other because it was easy.
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    Will reply to all of these individually when I get home later ^^ What is surprising is that the poll is showing around 1/5 to 1/4 students didn't know their universities provided mental health support!
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    Yep, I would not be here without it!
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    I visited mine a couple of times after a suicide attempt, however I've always felt nervous about accessing it due to constantly being told mental health problems don't exist in people from my area
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    I was depressed, I had some serious anxiety, I didn't want to leave and go home, I didn't want to carry on with some of the people who were around me.

    I went to the doctor, he confirmed that I wasn't just being stupid, that I had a problem and I needed help, help which he could provide me access to. I saw the counselling service run by student services - I didn't really like the woman I was seeing but that wasn't the point. I told my friends, a bunch of then psychology students, now psychology graduates, and they were the most supportive group of young women ever - they understood, they would invite me out for coffee and then go to the place closest to where I lived because that was less stressful and anxiety inducing for me to do, they never stopped inviting me out when I kept turning them down because I was having a bad day.

    I got home, I started taking tablets. They helped a little and then they stopped. I changed and those ones SERIOUSLY did not agree with me. I changed again and felt a little boost, I upped the dose and it's been like that for about a year now - it works, so why would I stop. I know drugs aren't the cure but it doesn't mean they are bad and I should stop - without them I don't think I'd get out of bed and get myself on a bus to work every morning.

    I'm still depressed, I'm still very anxious but I've gone from one panic attack every couple of days to having only had one so far this year. I saw the nurse today and she did a quick mental health review with me because I seemed so cheery, but I told her the drugs were helping and I wanted to keep them as they are. She gave me the information for how to access counselling through them in case I need it soon - not because she or I thought I needed it now, but because mental health is a marathon and not a sprint, and setbacks do happen, and she wouldn't be doing her job if she didn't try to equip me with the tools to help myself when bad thoughts hit.

    Admitting I needed help was the first step. I didn't necessarily get the help that I needed in the first place, but knowing that I could admit it to myself and to a group of incredibly open minded young women (who had already kind of guessed) that are still close friends now, three years later, and to two, three, four professionals and it not be the end of the world was the push I needed to get the help I needed and be a productive member of society.

    Please get help. Even if it's a temporary measure for now. Or if it didn't work last time. Or if you're scared of what people will think. Because nothing else matters if you don't look after yourself.
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    im actually a bit scared to speak to someone about how ive been feeling. i dont know if i should speak to someone. i think im just scared about coming to terms that im depressed and and actually speaking about it to someone
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    (Original post by AthiaKarim)
    im actually a bit scared to speak to someone about how ive been feeling. i dont know if i should speak to someone. i think im just scared about coming to terms that im depressed and and actually speaking about it to someone
    It's important to get help early on if at all possible. Coming to terms with a diagnosis of depression can be tough, but the longer things go undetected, the worse things are likely to get :sadnod:

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    Replying now Had a busy couple of days sorry!
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    It's important to get help early on if at all possible. Coming to terms with a diagnosis of depression can be tough, but the longer things go undetected, the worse things are likely to get :sadnod:

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    I second this.
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    Well, dang did not know this was today.
    Quick Brief: I'm 22, Female and I suffer with Depression, Anxiety, OCD, Dermatillomania and have been referred to be diagnosed for possible Autism/AS
    Also Trigger warnings for Self Harm and Suicide- be careful!

    Well I've had an experience not on in uni, but the other parts of the schooling "tree" as I call it.
    In secondary school I was developing severe depression, although I never spoke to anyone about it and my parents just thought I was being a teenager who didn't want to speak to them and would hide in her room away from them.
    A teacher was concerned for me and so sent me to a counsellor to talk over my problems, again I wasn't aware what I had because I believed my parents, I was just some silly teen right? it was normal to hate yourself and how you look right?
    Anywho, I left school, and recovered a little in college although still would have difficulties and slowly developed anxiety through those years- I may have became more confident but my anxiety increased due to the new pressures and stresses of A Levels.
    I started a job in 2013 with a department I liked the work of, it was a fun job to be in! but worse? I was being bullied in my workplace relentlessly, I would run into the womens bathrooms in tears, I would sit in a stall and run pencil sharpner blade over my wrists it was horrendous.
    I had a HUGE emotional/mental breakdown which resulted in me being sent to my Doctor to tell him the FULL TRUTH for once, and I off loaded.
    I was prescribed anti-depressants alongside a similar time the family doctor sent me to counselling for OCD. Later that year after not getting the correct dosage and unhelpful therapy. I tried to end my life twice in a couple months.

    Anywho- onwards, when I started Uni in 2015, I informed them of my mental health disability and they have been nothing short of amazing for me! Student finance edged me towards applying for DSA (which I have been awarded recently!) and I have been given student support from a support team based in my uni.
    A lot of my fellow students on the course are very very supportive too when I post on forums about my anxiety over a new essay or when I feel down, I cannot praise them enough!
    I always urge people who are attending university soon that if they have mental health issues to contact the student support or similar team at their university.
    Because its soooo worth it in the long run!

    ; - My Story isn't over yet

    -L
 
 
 
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