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Will 16 year olds vote in the EU referendum? watch

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    (Original post by The_Opinion)
    So should a 15 year old have a vote? How about a 10 year old, better yet, how about a fetus? 16 is too young and at that age most have little understanding of the "real world".
    Is a 15 year old entitled to a job? No. Do they have to pay Taxes? Nope. Do they get charged adult price for pretty much everything? Nope. If I have to pay adult prices, pay taxes, abide to adult laws and work I think it's only fair I get a say in what those taxes go towards, especially as much of the legislation that gets voted on takes years to process and most likely those 16 year olds will be at least 18 to 20 before its out into action. For example voting out of the the EU is going to effect a 16 year old for the majority of their working life, not the 60 year old that gets to vote, not the 40 year old with an established career but the 16 year old who is starting out in life. If we have to live with the consequences we should get a say. The Scottish referendum is just proof of how passionate young people are about the country they want to grow up in.


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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    Silly thing to assume? 16 year old are still in school and a forced to look at detail into politics and the news. Not only do some 16 year olds literally study politics as a subject but the national curriculum includes issues such as immigration which gets taught using up to date statistics and information,and students are encouraged to look further into their views on the topic. Political debates and exercises are also common in schools which leads students to invest time and fully weigh up the facts (not just what a bias party want to put into large print in the news). The truth is 16 year olds would probably use a lot more cold hard facts then many of the adult voters who are stuck 3 decades in the past, we are more open minded to change and aren't holding on to Britain's golden years like many of the older generations are.
    It's interesting that you make the claim, on several occasions, that students who are still in school, look at details when discussing politics and the news. Yet, not once have you provided any statistical evidence to back your claim.

    The burden of proof lays with you, seeing as you're the one who wants to change the status quo.
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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    Is a 15 year old entitled to a job? No. Do they have to pay Taxes? Nope. Do they get charged adult price for pretty much everything? Nope. If I have to pay adult prices, pay taxes, abide to adult laws and work I think it's only fair I get a say in what those taxes go towards, especially as much of the legislation that gets voted on takes years to process and most likely those 16 year olds will be at least 18 to 20 before its out into action. For example voting out of the the EU is going to effect a 16 year old for the majority of their working life, not the 60 year old that gets to vote, not the 40 year old with an established career but the 16 year old who is starting out in life. If we have to live with the consequences we should get a say. The Scottish referendum is just proof of how passionate young people are about the country they want to grow up in.


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    16 year olds quite frankly have little experience at life and no very little outside of their own small bubble, they should not have a vote. In my opinion 18 year olds also should not have a vote, but that is a slightly different issue.
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    It's interesting that you make the claim, on several occasions, that students who are still in school, look at details when discussing politics and the news. Yet, not once have you provided any statistical evidence to back your claim.

    The burden of proof lays with you, seeing as you're the one who wants to change the status quo.
    Just because no one has looked into or done a study on a topic doesn't mean it ceases to exist. I know this isn't valid evidence (because I can not find any evidence either proving or disproving my claim) but I'm still in school and therefore have friends around the country and my local area of school age. All the schools that they go to (adds up to about 23, majority in the south of England) hold political debates and offers government and politics as an A-level (which involves doing an hour every day into the subject). The particular school I go to holds mock votes on every major political issue where as a school everyone gets a vote. The older years (16-18 year olds) represent the parties they would vote for (if allowed) and give speeches and do extremely in depth research into the party in order to represent them within the school. Those who feel they are educated and passionate about a subject are the only ones who would bother voting in the real life referendum, anyone who hasn't seriously looked into the consequences and arguments wouldn't bother voting anyway which is more then I can say for adult voters who have heard one speech or are just following the political party that their family do.


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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    Just because no one has looked into or done a study on a topic doesn't mean it ceases to exist.
    The argument becomes an opinion.

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    I know this isn't valid evidence (because I can not find any evidence either proving or disproving my claim) but I'm still in school and therefore have friends around the country and my local area of school age. All the schools that they go to (adds up to about 23, majority in the south of England) hold political debates and offers government and politics as an A-level (which involves doing an hour every day into the subject).
    This is anecdotal and not fact.

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    The particular school I go to holds mock votes on every major political issue where as a school everyone gets a vote. The older years (16-18 year olds) represent the parties they would vote for (if allowed) and give speeches and do extremely in depth research into the party in order to represent them within the school. Those who feel they are educated and passionate about a subject are the only ones who would bother voting in the real life referendum, anyone who hasn't seriously looked into the consequences and arguments wouldn't bother voting anyway which is more then I can say for adult voters who have heard one speech or are just following the political party that their family do.
    Again, anecdotal.
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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    x
    Since you are so knowledgeable on politics why don't you enlighten us all about the economics of leaving the EU and the effect on our agricultural industry.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    I wouldn't trust a 16 year old to make a gin and tonic, let alone vote on the future of this country.

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    This.

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    16 year old should get a vote after all they are probably more up to date on current affairs then most the adults that get a vote.


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    It's not just about having information. At 16 you generally have no life experience, and haven't done anything yet other than consume state services and rely on your parents for anything else. Why anyone would care what you think in those circumstances I don't know.
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    Although I was too young to vote in the Scottish referendum, I saw in my school that young people were suddenly starting to take an interest in politics. As it stands, I can vote in the Scottish elections in May (and fully intend to) but not in the EU referendum just over a month earlier. However, the EU referendum is something that will affect me for longer than the election, so why can't I vote?
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    (Original post by Science_Girl)
    Although I was too young to vote in the Scottish referendum, I saw in my school that young people were suddenly starting to take an interest in politics. As it stands, I can vote in the Scottish elections in May (and fully intend to) but not in the EU referendum just over a month earlier. However, the EU referendum is something that will affect me for longer than the election, so why can't I vote?
    How do you make a Gin and Tonic?
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    The argument becomes an opinion.



    This is anecdotal and not fact.



    Again, anecdotal.
    So your telling me if no one did a study on if people have blue eyes people therefore can not possibly have blue eyes? And I did say that of course it is not evidence it is purely personal observation however it does prove that some (not all but some) teenagers do have the well informed views to vote for issues that effect them.


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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    At 16 you generally have no life experience, and haven't done anything yet other than consume state services and rely on your parents for anything else
    There are some adults that never leave the village they are born in and teenagers that have moved 20 times, living amongst a number of cultures within the uk and around the world. There are adults that have the right to vote that have never worked a day in their lives and teenagers that have actually worked for 4 or 5 years don't get a say? Life experience is something that obviously increases as age does but quality of life experience doesn't.




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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    There are some adults that never leave the village they are born in and teenagers that have moved 20 times, living amongst a number of cultures within the uk and around the world. There are adults that have the right to vote that have never worked a day in their lives and teenagers that have actually worked for 4 or 5 years don't get a say? Life experience is something that obviously increases as age does but quality of life experience doesn't.
    A highly relevant aspect of life experience that most if not all sixteen year olds lack is having worked more than a few hours on a weekend and paid substantial taxes. How well-travelled they are is neither here nor there imho.

    You are right that there are adults who have a similarly weak claim to a say in how the country is run, but the age restriction is a rough instrument. At least older people have had the chance to gain the relevant kinds of experience.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    A highly relevant aspect of life experience that most if not all sixteen year olds lack is having worked more than a few hours on a weekend and paid substantial taxes. How well-travelled they are is neither here nor there imho.

    You are right that there are adults who have a similarly weak claim to a say in how the country is run, but the age restriction is a rough instrument. At least older people have had the chance to gain the relevant kinds of experience.
    They may lack having worked a substantial amount of time every week but that doesn't come into play when deciding who is eligible within the adult population so I don't see why it should be the major decider for not letting 16 or 17 year olds vote. The difference between a 16 and 18 year old is 2 years life experience in which they probably were in school for 80% of the 2 years. So if 18 year old have the vote what makes them more able then 16 year olds.


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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    So your telling me if no one did a study on if people have blue eyes people therefore can not possibly have blue eyes?
    Saying that "people have blue eyes" is very different to saying that "all people have blue eyes". The former is a statement that can be proven by finding one individual with blue eyes; the latter is realistically impossible. Your initial statement made the fallacious assumption that all students and all schools are identical and therefore you can conclude that are more knowledgeable about Politics and current affairs than older folk. A conclusion based on a fallacious premise remains a fallacy.

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    And I did say that of course it is not evidence it is purely personal observation however it does prove that some (not all but some) teenagers do have the well informed views to vote for issues that effect them.
    Your initial statement was:

    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    16 year old should get a vote after all they are probably more up to date on current affairs then most the adults that get a vote.
    That is an assumption based on no evidence (either empirical or statistical) therefore incorrect. That was the whole point of this exchange.
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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    They may lack having worked a substantial amount of time every week but that doesn't come into play when deciding who is eligible within the adult population so I don't see why it should be the major decider for not letting 16 or 17 year olds vote. The difference between a 16 and 18 year old is 2 years life experience in which they probably were in school for 80% of the 2 years. So if 18 year old have the vote what makes them more able then 16 year olds.


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    Well nothing but age comes into play when deciding who can vote within the adult population. Obviously other factors apply to determine what the age should be in the first place.

    And if 16 year olds are able to vote, why not 14 year olds? How much difference do these two years make? You can chase this back to infancy if you really want to.

    Incidentally I'm not particularly pleased that 18 year olds have the vote either.
 
 
 
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