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    So at a visit day at one of my universities, they announced they had a 22 teaching week year!! That seems very small, and would mean if we paid £9000 a year in tuition fees and only had 22 weeks of tutution it would be over £400 a day, assuming we are taught every single day of those!

    So could anyone explain this to me - is it 22 weeks in total (as in adding up all the days of being taught) which is 154 days which is equivalent to 22 weeks, or is it 22 weeks which includes weekends and days that you don't have any lectures etc - which means it would be even more than £400 a day!?

    It just seems a very small amount of time!!
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    (Original post by Han-)
    So at a visit day at one of my universities, they announced they had a 22 teaching week year!! That seems very small, and would mean if we paid £9000 a year in tuition fees and only had 22 weeks of tutution it would be over £400 a day, assuming we are taught every single day of those!

    So could anyone explain this to me - is it 22 weeks in total (as in adding up all the days of being taught) which is 154 days which is equivalent to 22 weeks, or is it 22 weeks which includes weekends and days that you don't have any lectures etc - which means it would be even more than £400 a day!?

    It just seems a very small amount of time!!
    First check your maths...

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    Do you even maths bro?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    First check your maths...

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    So you can rest assured I'm not studying maths or wanting to do maths! Sorry that was a stupid mistake on my part.. okay so I mean £400 a week or nearly £60 a day. Maths skills, or no maths skills, it still seems like a little amount of teaching for a lot of money!
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    (Original post by Han-)
    So you can rest assured I'm not studying maths or wanting to do maths! Sorry that was a stupid mistake on my part.. okay so I mean £400 a week or nearly £60 a day. Maths skills, or no maths skills, it still seems like a little amount of teaching for a lot of money!
    At Cambridge we have about 20 weeks of teaching (three 8 week terms, last half of Easter term is exams). Quality is more important than quantity.
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    What you'll quickly learn is that teaching is accompanied by hours and hours of self-directed study. Therefore you'll be expected to make up the rest of the week with reading, revision and assignments.

    Don't expect to have 9-5 classes as it's not that sort of environment.
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    (Original post by Han-)
    So at a visit day at one of my universities, they announced they had a 22 teaching week year!! That seems very small, and would mean if we paid £9000 a year in tuition fees and only had 22 weeks of tutution it would be over £400 a day, assuming we are taught every single day of those!

    So could anyone explain this to me - is it 22 weeks in total (as in adding up all the days of being taught) which is 154 days which is equivalent to 22 weeks, or is it 22 weeks which includes weekends and days that you don't have any lectures etc - which means it would be even more than £400 a day!?

    It just seems a very small amount of time!!
    22 teachings weeks = 110 teaching days (which may actually be far smaller if like me you don't have any lectures or seminars on some days).

    The teaching weeks only include the working days and do not include weekends. 110 teaching days, as a proportion of £9000, results in approximately £82 per day. However, you need to remember the costs of writing and marking exams, having the facilities available for extra-curricular activities etc. which will mean you don't really spend anywhere near £82 per day on teaching. Still very expensive though, considering how much you pay to listen in to a lecture that is probably already available on Youtube.
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    (Original post by Han-)
    So you can rest assured I'm not studying maths or wanting to do maths! Sorry that was a stupid mistake on my part.. okay so I mean £400 a week or nearly £60 a day. Maths skills, or no maths skills, it still seems like a little amount of teaching for a lot of money!
    Which is free unless you go on to earn above £21k. And even if you earn £31k you effectively repay at the same cost as a Starbucks coffee, per day.

    Pretty good value for a uni education.

    Oh, and if you do have short terms (a la Oxbridge) that gives you more time for work experiences / internships / etc. Especially in the longer summer vacation.

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Which is free unless you go on to earn above £21k. And even if you earn £31k you effectively repay at the same cost as a shop-bought coffee, per day.

    Pretty good value for a uni education.

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    Maybe it is, maybe it isn't.

    Yes I'm laughing if I earn less than £21,000. But if I earn a middle income salary it might really limit my ability to save for a house deposit or life savings etc. Daily coffee is expensive, and I certainly wouldn't be buying one a day when trying to save £££. With high income, student loan repayments seem pretty insignificant. So if I fall into that middle income bracket, I am penalised much more than if I'm receiving low or high income.

    Anyhow I understand that is the price to pay for a university education, I'm was just (not unpleasantly) surprised at the sparse teaching.
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    (Original post by Han-)
    Anyhow I understand that is the price to pay for a university education, I'm was just (not unpleasantly) surprised at the sparse teaching.
    = Intensive learning.

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    Oh ok, it's 22 teaching weeks + 2 reading weeks + 6 exam period weeks + fresher's. That's fairly standard. And yeah you're not really paying for the teaching, you're paying mostly for the diploma.
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    (Original post by Han-)
    So at a visit day at one of my universities, they announced they had a 22 teaching week year!! That seems very small, and would mean if we paid £9000 a year in tuition fees and only had 22 weeks of tutution it would be over £400 a day, assuming we are taught every single day of those!

    So could anyone explain this to me - is it 22 weeks in total (as in adding up all the days of being taught) which is 154 days which is equivalent to 22 weeks, or is it 22 weeks which includes weekends and days that you don't have any lectures etc - which means it would be even more than £400 a day!?

    It just seems a very small amount of time!!
    Firstly, 9000/22 (if you must) = 409.

    Secondly, this isn't how things work. The money you 'pay' is not just for contact time (i.e. when the tutors are in the class teaching you).

    Those 22 weeks are likely to be 2 x 11 week semesters where teaching happens. Bear in mind that, following each of these, you'll have a 3-4 week christmas/easter, during which your tutors will be marking. A lot. And after easter is an exam period, which can go up to 8 weeks in length. So, is that now more like a 38 week year?

    Your question seems like a 'Where does the money go?': well it's not just your teaching. Lecturers, tutors, demonstrators etc, if paid hourly, get between 20-42 pounds per contact hour. For each contact hour (of you being in class) they also have to prepare material, and mark and moderate coursework and exams. Marking takes considerably longer than you would expect, too.

    Aside from contact time, there's plenty that the money can contribute towards. The library alone is particularly costly - universities can easily spend millions per year just to provide you with access to the journal articles you'll need for essays and reports...plus, think of how much it costs to buy books, pay helpdesk and security staff. Security, heating, lighting, and maintenance for all the other buildings, too. Then there's the computer software licenses - especially if you do something requiring more specialist stuff. IT equipment. Lab equipment. Research (which puts your department on the map, REF/league table-wise). Admin services (giving you an offer in the first place, timetabling, grade systems, etc). Support services (careers advice, counsellors, etc). There's a hell of a lot of behind-the-scenes!
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    Don't forget that in addition to the 22 teaching weeks per year, you will have
    - exam weeks (usually around 5, across January and May/June)
    - fresher's week
    - Christmas and Easter holidays, which are effectively study leave, not holidays

    You'll be studying fairly solidly from September to June, regardless of how many teaching weeks you actually get.

    Don't make the mistake of thinking that tuition fees are only there to pay for tuition. They also cover
    - staff, from cleaners to security to many, many staff who you probably don't know exist but which are actually quite vital to the running of the uni
    - the students union
    - services eg counselling, advice, etc etc
    - libraries
    - bursaries
    - open days and other activities which you will have attended before going to uni
    - building maintenance and repair
    Etc etc

    It's also worth remembering that tripling tuition fees coincided with a cut in the teaching grant that unis receive from the government - they're actually not really any better funded than they once were

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    (Original post by Han-)
    So at a visit day at one of my universities, they announced they had a 22 teaching week year!! That seems very small, and would mean if we paid £9000 a year in tuition fees and only had 22 weeks of tutution it would be over £400 a day, assuming we are taught every single day of those!

    So could anyone explain this to me - is it 22 weeks in total (as in adding up all the days of being taught) which is 154 days which is equivalent to 22 weeks, or is it 22 weeks which includes weekends and days that you don't have any lectures etc - which means it would be even more than £400 a day!?

    It just seems a very small amount of time!!

    It depends, the math is a little wrong as others have pointed. On my course I have 24 weeks not including easter or christmas or summer holidays, I don't get half term holidays. And I have 10 hours a week of scheduled lectures or seminars. But as a lecture once told me "You have 48 hours of teach per module and you need to put in 152 hours of independent study yourself." Look at the course you want to do and see if it mentions anything about it or ask students on open days that do your course.
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    yeah, that's pretty normal - use it as motivation not to miss a lecture you paid £60 for!

    as people said you're paying for other services too: counselling, student support, union, library etc
 
 
 

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