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    I've been thinking about possible career choices, and one of them was to be a doctor. Recently, however, my mind has changed and I no longer want to be one. I have doctors in the family and was grown up with relatives telling me not to go into Medicine, saying it is stressful etc, and I didn't listen to them... I thought they were trying to put me off a good career. I have now realised that what my relatives were saying is right. Medicine/being a doctor is incredibly stressful, is not paid enough compared to the number of hours worked, (at least as far as those below consultant level).. and then once you're a consultant the career takes over your life as you are relied on to treat and overlook the care of patients and after years of work finally reach decent pay. (that is to say they can start getting paid back the amount of money lost as a junior doctor who was overworked and underpaid).


    So is it really worth it? The stress, the long hours, the responsibility. Don't apply for Medicine to be a hero, your dreams will be broken once you start working as a junior doctor.
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    I've been thinking about possible career choices, and one of them was to be a doctor. Recently, however, my mind has changed and I no longer want to be one. I have doctors in the family and was grown up with relatives telling me not to go into Medicine, saying it is stressful etc, and I didn't listen to them... I thought they were trying to put me off a good career. I have now realised that what my relatives were saying is right. Medicine/being a doctor is incredibly stressful, is not paid enough compared to the number of hours worked, (at least as far as those below consultant level).. and then once your a consultant the career takes over your life as you are relied on to treat and overlook the care of patients and after years of work finally reach decent pay. (that is to say they can start getting paid back the amount of money lost as a junior doctor who was overworked and underpaid).


    So is it really worth it? The stress, the long hours, the responsibility. Don't apply for Medicine to be a hero, your dreams will be broken once you start working as a junior doctor.
    For some it is. But yeah, 60% of US doctors would retire if they could. Pay is debatable (you get funding no-one else gets, are earning as much as a paramedic while a junior, then within a few years are earning 50k+, then potentially hundreds of thousands depending on speciality. Stress though, ridiculous levels, and ridiculous work hours.

    I remember reading that the head of Harvard (may have been another Ivy League) Medical School had advised their child to never go into medicine, that's about as authoritative as it gets. That said, 60% wanting to retire means 40% don't. I do think a huge amount of people go into medicine who really shouldn't.
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    I've been thinking about possible career choices, and one of them was to be a doctor. Recently, however, my mind has changed and I no longer want to be one. I have doctors in the family and was grown up with relatives telling me not to go into Medicine, saying it is stressful etc, and I didn't listen to them... I thought they were trying to put me off a good career. I have now realised that what my relatives were saying is right. Medicine/being a doctor is incredibly stressful, is not paid enough compared to the number of hours worked, (at least as far as those below consultant level).. and then once your a consultant the career takes over your life as you are relied on to treat and overlook the care of patients and after years of work finally reach decent pay. (that is to say they can start getting paid back the amount of money lost as a junior doctor who was overworked and underpaid).


    So is it really worth it? The stress, the long hours, the responsibility. Don't apply for Medicine to be a hero, your dreams will be broken once you start working as a junior doctor.
    So what's plan b?


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    Doing Medicine is not plan A anymore... so plan A is the course I want to do instead of Medicine. I have no plan B.
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    Medicine really isn't a career path that you can look at pragmatically, it's not about the number of hours worked or the pay, obviously you want to be able to earn enough to live well and it's not unreasonable to want time off but the main factor in becoming a doctor is a passion for helping other people and a genuine interest in the profession, it doesn't really matter how much work you do if you don't have that imo
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    Medicine really isn't a career path that you can look at pragmatically, it's not about the number of hours worked or the pay, obviously you want to be able to earn enough to live well and it's not unreasonable to want time off but the main factor in becoming a doctor is a passion for helping other people and a genuine interest in the profession, it doesn't really matter how much work you do if you don't have that imo
    A lot of jobs share those characteristics.
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    A lot of jobs share those characteristics.
    A lot of jobs share the characteristic of 'a genuine interest in [medicine]'? Maybe other healthcare jobs (nursing, paramedicine, midwifery, etc) but I wouldn't say a lot.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    A lot of jobs share the characteristic of 'a genuine interest in [medicine]'? Maybe other healthcare jobs (nursing, paramedicine, midwifery, etc) but I wouldn't say a lot.
    A lot of employees share the characteristic of a genuine interest in their profession... which is what Blondi987 wrote in her original post. She wasn't specifying Medicine.
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    Medicine will put you in debt, idiots saying medicine is worth it, when they are probs junior doctors striking smh


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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    A lot of employees share the characteristic of a genuine interest in their profession... which is what Blondi987 wrote in her original post. She wasn't specifying Medicine.
    But most professions don't involve taking a Hippocratic oath to save people's lives, I'm just saying that medicine itself is seen as a very reputable profession but those who let that steer their choice often drop out as the only thing that can really keep you going in such a demanding career is a 'need' to help others.
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    A lot of employees share the characteristic of a genuine interest in their profession... which is what Blondi987 wrote in her original post. She wasn't specifying Medicine.
    It was implied. If you have a genuine interest in medicine, that outweighs your other interests, then you've qualified on that count. You can do other jobs, but you may not end up satisfied.

    If you have other interests that are on the same level, then you probably shouldn't do medicine.
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    Medicine really isn't a career path that you can look at pragmatically, it's not about the number of hours worked or the pay, obviously you want to be able to earn enough to live well and it's not unreasonable to want time off but the main factor in becoming a doctor is a passion for helping other people and a genuine interest in the profession, it doesn't really matter how much work you do if you don't have that imo
    I disagree greatly.

    At the end of the day, it's a job. It's where you'll spend a large part of your waking hours. It needs to have good conditions.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I disagree greatly.

    At the end of the day, it's a job. It's where you'll spend a large part of your waking hours. It needs to have good conditions.
    I didn't say it didn't have to have good conditions? And I did state in my post that it's not unreasonable for op to want fairly paid or normal working hours at all, but being a doctor is demanding, it's not a job to take lightly, op asked if it was worth to and it wouldn't be if your heart weren't in it.
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    I didn't say it didn't have to have good conditions? And I did state in my post that it's not unreasonable for op to want fairly paid or normal working hours at all, but being a doctor is demanding, it's not a job to take lightly, op asked if it was worth to and it wouldn't be if your heart weren't in it.
    Either way, it should be looked at incredibly pragmatically. It's very demanding, as you say, financially, emotionally and socially. If you aren't considering these factors pragmatically and go into it simply on the "ooooh saving lives" routine then you're going to have a very bad time.

    It's also not a bad thing to question your dedication to medicine. You don't have to be 100% comitted to medicine to be a good doctor. It's ok to be uncertain. In fact, if there wasn't a small amount of doubt I would wonder whether or not you've actually thought about it properly.

    At the end of the day, it can be a really **** job. It's long hours, **** pay and rubbish conditions. Feeling good about yourself doesn't pay the mortgage or cook the dinner when you get home three hours late.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I disagree greatly.

    At the end of the day, it's a job.
    Mental note: never engage a doctor named Etomidate. If all you are looking for is a job, irrespective of the other ranked characteristics (salary, working conditions, prestige, etc.), there will always be better options. If you are not compelled to a vocation of ambitious servanthood, you've made the wrong choice for both you and your patients. When I'm proper sick, I want someone whose only interest is me.
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    (Original post by buraddo)
    Mental note: never engage a doctor named Etomidate. If all you are looking for is a job, irrespective of the other ranked characteristics (salary, working conditions, prestige, etc.), there will always be better options. If you are not compelled to a vocation of ambitious servanthood, you've made the wrong choice for both you and your patients. When I'm proper sick, I want someone whose only interest is me.
    Lmao. Get over yourself, mate. Servanthood? Want me to tickle your balls for you after I save your life? Yass sir, I is a good doctor, sir. I do what the good boss man says, sir.
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    (Original post by buraddo)
    Mental note: never engage a doctor named Etomidate. If all you are looking for is a job, irrespective of the other ranked characteristics (salary, working conditions, prestige, etc.), there will always be better options. If you are not compelled to a vocation of ambitious servanthood, you've made the wrong choice for both you and your patients. When I'm proper sick, I want someone whose only interest is me.
    I think a lot of people in this thread aren't differentiating between the reality and the ideal of doctoring.

    Functioning day to day as a doctor in the 21st century Tory run NHS is very different to being a doctor in the 1960s. Or in the 1800s. Or in the days of Hippocrates. The ideal has always been to alleviate suffering and provide the best care for patients, but the reality is that other factors are involved too. Ideals only go so far I'm afraid.

    I've made this point before but I'll make it again: teaching is a profession which has traditionally attracted some of the biggest idealists of all - and yet, if you talk to your average teacher nowadays, you'd find that many of them have had their sense of vocation severely eroded by constant assaults on their collective morale (especially when Michael Gove was in power).

    The problem is not with medicine or teaching as a profession, or with individual doctors or teachers: it is with the working environment which they are being forced to work in. I would suggest that you stop viewing workers as merely their job title (doctor, teacher etc) and start thinking about the conditions which contribute to their productivity and satisfaction. People are not automatons.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Lmao. Get over yourself, mate. Servanthood? Want me to tickle your balls for you after I save your life? Yass sir, I is a good doctor, sir. I do what the good boss man says, sir.
    I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and doff my cap to you as a delightful troll. Otherwise I would have to pity you for your exhausting arrogance. Sadly, I think that the latter is more common than the former. We breed that quality into our young medical students and pay the price for this in the doctors who we produce. And surely this is not good for them either, in generating an expectation of social gratitude for their care, which inevitably cannot be satisfied, so proxies (like wages) are used, which themselves are only a poor substitute for the enduring adoration they seek. And we are surprised when doctors are unsatisfied with their jobs! Perhaps my expectations are too high, or too unrealistic in light of the other demands we have in our selection and training processes. 21 year olds with more assumed authority than their young egos can cope with.
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    (Original post by buraddo)
    I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and doff my cap to you as a delightful troll. Otherwise I would have to pity you for your exhausting arrogance. Sadly, I think that the latter is more common than the former. We breed that quality into our young medical students and pay the price for this in the doctors who we produce. And surely this is not good for them either, in generating an expectation of social gratitude for their care, which inevitably cannot be satisfied, so proxies (like wages) are used, which themselves are only a poor substitute for the enduring adoration they seek. And we are surprised when doctors are unsatisfied with their jobs! Perhaps my expectations are too high, or too unrealistic in light of the other demands we have in our selection and training processes. 21 year olds with more assumed authority than their young egos can cope with.
    You're trying very hard, here.
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    #iamverysmart

    (Original post by Etomidate)
    You're trying very hard, here.
    Woe is me, curse those contemptible rapscallions located in the darkest depths of TSR that have prevented me from bestowing you with your deserved reputation for this post. (PRSOM)
 
 
 
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