Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Economics at UCL vs Warwick Watch

  • View Poll Results: UCL vs Warwick for Econ?
    UCL (Econ with a year abroad)
    45.45%
    Warwick (Econ)
    54.55%

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I'm an offer holder for UCL Economics with a Year Abroad and for Warwick Economics. I can't decide which one to firm. Originally, I was going to firm UCL because the year abroad programme would let me go to Columbia/Chicago/Penn and I thought UCL had a better international reputation (currently #7 worldwide). However I recently discovered that Warwick is climbing up the rankings (it's currently #2 in the Econ rankings in the UK). One of my worries is that by the time I graduate, Warwick might have a better reputation internationally than UCL (if I firm UCL)? So I was wondering what you thought?

    Which one is better in terms of reputation in the UK and internationally (now and in the future)? Investment banking job prospects (I think they're about the same)? Which department is better?

    Also, I'm rather confused as to whether Warwick has a year abroad option for Economics? I think they do for European universities but do they have options for American universities?

    Thanks
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Bump
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by icecreamcake)
    I'm an offer holder for UCL Economics with a Year Abroad and for Warwick Economics. I can't decide which one to firm. Originally, I was going to firm UCL because the year abroad programme would let me go to Columbia/Chicago/Penn and I thought UCL had a better international reputation (currently #7 worldwide). However I recently discovered that Warwick is climbing up the rankings (it's currently #2 in the Econ rankings in the UK). One of my worries is that by the time I graduate, Warwick might have a better reputation internationally than UCL (if I firm UCL)? So I was wondering what you thought?

    Which one is better in terms of reputation in the UK and internationally (now and in the future)? Investment banking job prospects (I think they're about the same)? Which department is better?

    Also, I'm rather confused as to whether Warwick has a year abroad option for Economics? I think they do for European universities but do they have options for American universities?

    Thanks
    Hi, second year L100 UCL student here.

    Looking at the same question myself a few years ago, I made my decision based on the international reputation and difference in offers - UCL requiring an A* in Maths (I know someone who missed an A* by a mark and didn't get in).

    Note that UCL is probably the most quantitative Economics degree in the UK.

    I would say that being in London is better if you want to go for investment banking as you can get internships in the City; the Careers tutor said to me that the majority of graduates want to into this industry.

    I would take rankings with a pinch of salt - it depends how they are calculated. This was welcome for the department though: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/news...december14/ref

    I don't think that there is much difference between the two; getting a good degree from either will look just as good.

    Hope that helps albeit possibly not impartial.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by icecreamcake)
    I'm an offer holder for UCL Economics with a Year Abroad and for Warwick Economics. I can't decide which one to firm. Originally, I was going to firm UCL because the year abroad programme would let me go to Columbia/Chicago/Penn and I thought UCL had a better international reputation (currently #7 worldwide). However I recently discovered that Warwick is climbing up the rankings (it's currently #2 in the Econ rankings in the UK). One of my worries is that by the time I graduate, Warwick might have a better reputation internationally than UCL (if I firm UCL)? So I was wondering what you thought?

    Which one is better in terms of reputation in the UK and internationally (now and in the future)? Investment banking job prospects (I think they're about the same)? Which department is better?

    Also, I'm rather confused as to whether Warwick has a year abroad option for Economics? I think they do for European universities but do they have options for American universities?

    Thanks
    Congrats on the offer!

    What were GCSE grades and A level options and predictions? Just curious lol
    My cousin was in a similar position and chose UCL based on reputation. Depends how much u wanna stay in london
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Always keep in mind league tables are infamous for overrating and underrating certain universities, and I am VERY dubious over the fact that UCL is over-all rated better than i.e. LSE.

    Example: LSE is near the top 30 on the league tables, and though not top-ivy league (Yale, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton)/Oxbridge level, in the UK, many would definitely argue it excels UCL generally-speaking. (Also UCL right below Oxford (ranked 6) in QS rankings? And taking American universities for example: Columbia ranked 22 and right near KCL, and Cornell ranked 5 spots ahead of Columbia? I am sensing quite a bit "inaccuracy" in these ratings...

    Point of that example was: I would take these university rankings with a grain of salt (as above poster has said). It can be mentally debilitating when we focus on league table rankings. Just my advice, but I understand why you are considering their positions on league tables, and I respect your decision, nevertheless, I do hope you choose the university that will do the most for you--choosing a school based on prestige will only take you so far.
    I really think it is unnecessary to choose a school with all these "Ifs" in your head (such as "What if UCL ends up not looking as good as Warwick?" Pick the school you see yourself happiest at!

    With all that said,
    Congratulations on your offers! It really does depend on whether you would like to venture out to the USA for job opportunities, or stay in the UK for investment banking. On a general-level, UCL is not the university that will raise eyebrows in the United States/it does not ring a bell of prestige the way Oxbridge does. Frankly, Warwick definitely does not either. If you were to solely choose based on prestige and wanted to work in the United States--chose UCL.
    If you were to look at job prospects in the UK-- you would not go wrong with Warwick or UCL! Both are great for your programme, and you would not be disadvantaged in any way in UK investment banking if you chose Warwick!

    Of course, if you were to say on the streets, "I went to Warwick for Economics!" it probably would not ring as much "prestige" to the general person, compared to saying, "I went to UCL!"

    EDIT: I would pick UCL because you receive the opportunity to study overseas, and I would enjoy that experience greatly! Also, Penn/Columbia/Chicago are all three incredible universities, and you can also learn more about the USA investment banking industry. (Plus, despite only studying abroad, you can add in one of those schools onto your CV for a year, and it will, arguably, lift your CV up a slight notch, both in the USA and UK)

    It seems you can study overseas from Warwick as well. From what I could find, only University of California though!

    Best of luck to you, and I hope this lengthy post helped :P
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Coombsy)
    Hi, second year L100 UCL student here.

    Looking at the same question myself a few years ago, I made my decision based on the international reputation and difference in offers - UCL requiring an A* in Maths (I know someone who missed an A* by a mark and didn't get in).

    Note that UCL is probably the most quantitative Economics degree in the UK.

    I would say that being in London is better if you want to go for investment banking as you can get internships in the City; the Careers tutor said to me that the majority of graduates want to into this industry.

    I would take rankings with a pinch of salt - it depends how they are calculated. This was welcome for the department though: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/news...december14/ref

    I don't think that there is much difference between the two; getting a good degree from either will look just as good.

    Hope that helps albeit possibly not impartial.
    Thanks for your reply!

    I was wondering how Econ is at UCL? How is the teaching quality and contact hours? How many people are there approximately in the year? How is the workload? How difficult is the maths there - I'm taking Further Maths, but I was wondering how difficult the Maths was? Do they teach you a lot more Math?

    Also, I had a look at your profile and found that my grades are very similar to yours - I was wondering why you didn't take a gap year and apply to Oxbridge instead of going to UCL (although UCL is obviously great too)?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by frognation22)
    Always keep in mind league tables are infamous for overrating and underrating certain universities, and I am VERY dubious over the fact that UCL is over-all rated better than i.e. LSE.

    Example: LSE is near the top 30 on the league tables, and though not top-ivy league (Yale, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton)/Oxbridge level, in the UK, many would definitely argue it excels UCL generally-speaking. (Also UCL right below Oxford (ranked 6) in QS rankings? And taking American universities for example: Columbia ranked 22 and right near KCL, and Cornell ranked 5 spots ahead of Columbia? I am sensing quite a bit "inaccuracy" in these ratings...

    Point of that example was: I would take these university rankings with a grain of salt (as above poster has said). It can be mentally debilitating when we focus on league table rankings. Just my advice, but I understand why you are considering their positions on league tables, and I respect your decision, nevertheless, I do hope you choose the university that will do the most for you--choosing a school based on prestige will only take you so far.
    I really think it is unnecessary to choose a school with all these "Ifs" in your head (such as "What if UCL ends up not looking as good as Warwick?" Pick the school you see yourself happiest at!

    With all that said,
    Congratulations on your offers! It really does depend on whether you would like to venture out to the USA for job opportunities, or stay in the UK for investment banking. On a general-level, UCL is not the university that will raise eyebrows in the United States/it does not ring a bell of prestige the way Oxbridge does. Frankly, Warwick definitely does not either. If you were to solely choose based on prestige and wanted to work in the United States--chose UCL.
    If you were to look at job prospects in the UK-- you would not go wrong with Warwick or UCL! Both are great for your programme, and you would not be disadvantaged in any way in UK investment banking if you chose Warwick!

    Of course, if you were to say on the streets, "I went to Warwick for Economics!" it probably would not ring as much "prestige" to the general person, compared to saying, "I went to UCL!"

    EDIT: I would pick UCL because you receive the opportunity to study overseas, and I would enjoy that experience greatly! Also, Penn/Columbia/Chicago are all three incredible universities, and you can also learn more about the USA investment banking industry. (Plus, despite only studying abroad, you can add in one of those schools onto your CV for a year, and it will, arguably, lift your CV up a slight notch, both in the USA and UK)

    It seems you can study overseas from Warwick as well. From what I could find, only University of California though!

    Best of luck to you, and I hope this lengthy post helped :P
    Thank you so much for your reply - I found it super helpful!! I think I'm going to pick UCL (I preferred it from the beginning anyways).

    Also, I was just wondering if you think I should reapply to Oxbridge and LSE? I know that this is a huge risk because I might not get any offers the second time round, but do you think that Oxbridge/LSE is that much better than UCL to deserve a gap year?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by icecreamcake)
    Thank you so much for your reply - I found it super helpful!! I think I'm going to pick UCL (I preferred it from the beginning anyways).

    Also, I was just wondering if you think I should reapply to Oxbridge and LSE? I know that this is a huge risk because I might not get any offers the second time round, but do you think that Oxbridge/LSE is that much better than UCL to deserve a gap year?
    Well yes, I would argue that LSE and Oxbridge are definitely better than UCL when it comes to Economics, but UCL is, by no means, horrible for economics. You will still receive a great education from UCL. However, you might feel UCL can provide you with a good education, but not a great undergraduate experience. Do you feel you would be happier at Oxbridge or LSE? If so, then maybe you should consider deferring your entry at UCL and reapply for first year entry this September!

    I would say that while Oxbridge/LSE could provide me with an even better education, I would not defer my entry to UCL because I would be satisfied enough with my education and experience there! Good luck!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by icecreamcake)
    Thanks for your reply!

    I was wondering how Econ is at UCL? How is the teaching quality and contact hours? How many people are there approximately in the year? How is the workload? How difficult is the maths there - I'm taking Further Maths, but I was wondering how difficult the Maths was? Do they teach you a lot more Math?

    Also, I had a look at your profile and found that my grades are very similar to yours - I was wondering why you didn't take a gap year and apply to Oxbridge instead of going to UCL (although UCL is obviously great too)?
    I'm enjoying the course - mostly because it's very quantitative as I have said which is what I wanted.

    Like school and college, some of the lecturers and teaching assistants are good and some are not. Overall, I think the teaching is average but I think it's up to you to be proactive and understand the material - a distinct difference from school and college.

    You will probably average around 14 contact hours a week over the degree so I don't think there is no excuse to let the work get on top of you.

    The Maths can be challenging at times but doing Further Maths will set you up well for the first year where 1.5/4 units are solely maths. What you learn in these units is then used for the courses in the following years.

    I got rejected from Cambridge (after being pooled) and LSE.

    Hope that helps.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hey i have been in the same dilemma. But for me both are economics L100 without a year abroad. Do u think i should still go UCL or Warwick then?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.