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    (Original post by frognation22)
    I have not explored the Liberal arts schools in Europe (as of yet), and I believe they are probably too late to apply to for Fall 2016 entry!

    I attended a summer programme at MIT not too long ago in the summer, and I had an absolutely blast. Everything was absolutely wonderful. The passion for the subjects, community with those in the programme...

    1) Boston is incredible to me, and it's quite amazing as I see so many students who return to MIT for the remaining half of their December/January breaks to explore the city with other fellow students, and their school. (especially first years)

    2) There is such a sense of community and passion for the STEM fields. I.e. the students allow their creativity and passion for engineering to shine through when they build the handmade wooden roller coasters for the incoming freshers.

    3) I know some people think the resulting degrees might be a bit more broad because the students have to take general classes, but for the private universities I've applied to- they tend to have much stricter "general" curriculums than i.e. public USA universities. And also the university length is four years- I love that extra bonus year, and I think it is fairly nice to do both a "major" and "minor." I know mental health tends to be a huge problem in the 'elite' schools such as UChicago so it sounds crazy to say this, but I also find myself liking how the term weeks are lengthier, and there is more chance to have more lecture time for each module

    4) I also think the mentality of USA and UK university students at the "top" universities are very different. The cultures are very different, and in the UK it often seems like university is just a means to receive a job, and there is a huge job-oriented focus in places like LSE and UCL. Of course, it is emphasised like that too in the USA, but going to university carries so much more symbolism there (i.e. the students really emphasise on making life-long connections/building relationships with the faculty and students)

    The list could go on and on, but I don't feel comfortable to share the specifics as it does get more personal to me!
    I echo this^ Also attended a summer programme at MIT.

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    (Original post by frognation22)
    Of course I'm not saying MIT students are more passionate than their British counterparts, just that I fit more into the USA university community more. And I would say the general requirements at Columbia are very much strict (i.e. Core Curriculum, and the modules you are supposed to take are very much limited-they have it set for you)

    In large public USA universities, it's often been "we require 3 modules in a science, 1 in a maths, 2 in arts/diversity credit" etc. It's very much up to the students to decide.

    The "jobs oriented" is very much directed towards UCL and LSE. Especially the culture I have seen at LSE and attending the open day!
    The point about the general requirements at Columbia is that there are a lot of them, more I think than at most other American colleges. That means you're going to have less specialist knowledge. I take your point about LSE, their students are famously obsessed with their careers but I don't think you can say that about UCL, or any other British university.
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    Gotta love the density of dunkin' donuts in Boston OP

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I echo this^ Also attended a summer programme at MIT.

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    What would you say were the aspects you liked most about MIT!
    And yes LOL definitely the Dunkin Donuts! XD
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Gotta love the \frac{m}{V} of dunkin' donuts in Boston OP

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    Fixed.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Fixed.
    That was.. omg :rofl:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    That was.. omg :rofl:
    Gotta bring my ray of maths where I go :yep: :rofl:
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Fixed.
    Just reminded me of a magnet I bought a couple years ago

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    (Original post by Student403)
    Just reminded me of a magnet I bought a couple years ago
    :rofl: :rofl: MIT omg that's the nerdiest thing every I love it :rofl:
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    The point about the general requirements at Columbia is that there are a lot of them, more I think than at most other American colleges. That means you're going to have less specialist knowledge. I take your point about LSE, their students are famously obsessed with their careers but I don't think you can say that about UCL, or any other British university.
    Ah I see what you are saying. Sorry for the confusion! Columbia most definitely does take up nearly 1/3 of the students' university time, but I would argue the "general ed" classes are much more specific (due to them being set) than i.e. ones at University of Wisconsin/a large public school.

    But nearly every student who has chosen Columbia believes the Core will contribute positively to their undergraduate education/experience, and therefore, does not mind it. One of the students I know who is part of SEAS said despite him doing the engineering programme, it really helped broaden his mind and view the sciences in a different manner, and he felt he didn't learn any less from other students attending different schools (Like MIT) Hence, why I was so keen on going to Columbia for Mathematics (even over MIT)

    I don't know much about UCL yet (attending the open day on 9th March), but LSE certainly did give off a very...dare I say..."superficial vibe." It was unfortunate to see how many students there were attending for instrumental reasons. The job-oriented "vibe" might definitely be more of a London university thing--I don't see it as much amongst Oxbridge students. I do feel I would still choose one of the "elite" USA universities over UCL though. Would definitely be a bit more conflicted if I applied to Cambridge and was given an offer.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    :rofl: :rofl: MIT omg that's the nerdiest thing every I love it :rofl:
    Hehehe it served as some fun inspiration a couple of times :giggle:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Just reminded me of a magnet I bought a couple years ago

    Lol. I'm loving that magnet! Wish I bought more souvenirs whilst I was there.
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    Lol. I'm loving that magnet! Wish I bought more souvenirs whilst I was there.
    It's my favourite one!
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    What would you say were the aspects you liked most about MIT!
    And yes LOL definitely the Dunkin Donuts! XD
    I did an entrepreneurship programme there which was, safe to say, quite hardcore. Got exposure to current students, HBS/Sloan professors, a few mentors in the local Boston venture capital/startup communities etc

    What I found:
    - The people there are super interesting. Even just looking at the people in my program, we used to stay up until 3-4am just talking about the distribution of global wealth, poverty, affirmative action worries. It's like everyone is smart, but they also care a tonne about the wider issues in the world and aren't afraid to voice their opinions.

    - Facilities are immense. I spent time in some of the research centres (Age Lab was my favourite) and the level of investment put in to maintain bleeding edge facilities is unlike anything I've seen before. You can feel it, just by stepping foot onto the campus it sort of engulfs you in its enormity. All the research staff and current students involved in research were clearly very passionate about solving problems and tackling some of the world's biggest issues

    - It's not all work, work and work. Yes, you'd find yourself grinding through a problem sheet for hours into the night but the next day you could be playing soccer with your friends or going down to Chinatown for a meal, or even watching a RedSox game. There's very much a work hard, play hard mentality.

    - Students were, on the whole, much more interested in pursuing startups and going into research than say, heading into i-banking or finance. There's an entrepreneurial 'buzz' around the place that you don't feel if you're at a UK uni.

    - Basically, people there are smart and deserve to be there. You'll find that one Ugandan kid who created some bizarre light bulb solution to power his village and that one kid who opened up a string of restaurants. With the generous financial aid and the very specific nature of the admissions system, MIT can hand pick the best of the best students.

    (Original post by Zacken)
    Fixed.
    Looooooooooool, good one!

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I did an entrepreneurship programme there which was, safe to say, quite hardcore. Got exposure to current students, HBS/Sloan professors, a few mentors in the local Boston venture capital/startup communities etc

    What I found:
    - The people there are super interesting. Even just looking at the people in my program, we used to stay up until 3-4am just talking about the distribution of global wealth, poverty, affirmative action worries. It's like everyone is smart, but they also care a tonne about the wider issues in the world and aren't afraid to voice their opinions.

    - Facilities are immense. I spent time in some of the research centres (Age Lab was my favourite) and the level of investment put in to maintain bleeding edge facilities is unlike anything I've seen before. You can feel it, just by stepping foot onto the campus it sort of engulfs you in its enormity. All the research staff and current students involved in research were clearly very passionate about solving problems and tackling some of the world's biggest issues

    - It's not all work, work and work. Yes, you'd find yourself grinding through a problem sheet for hours into the night but the next day you could be playing soccer with your friends or going down to Chinatown for a meal, or even watching a RedSox game. There's very much a work hard, play hard mentality.

    - Students were, on the whole, much more interested in pursuing startups and going into research than say, heading into i-banking or finance. There's an entrepreneurial 'buzz' around the place that you don't feel if you're at a UK uni.

    - Basically, people there are smart and deserve to be there. You'll find that one Ugandan kid who created some bizarre light bulb solution to power his village and that one kid who opened up a string of restaurants. With the generous financial aid and the very specific nature of the admissions system, MIT can hand pick the best of the best students.



    Looooooooooool, good one!

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    I echo this so much! I've heard of so many students receiving "full ride" scholarships to MIT because their families could not afford it. It would be such a dream to attend. And also the collaboration between students when it comes to working on PSETS? So brilliant haha! Despite them being so difficult, you see students still share a huge passion for them and bond over such academic activities. The culture really is quite fascinating.

    I also absolutely agree with you when you say the students are very much well-aware of their surroundings, and worldly affairs. Despite it not having as much of a humanities/liberal arts focus like Columbia, the students are incredibly involved with their communities and political activism (Same goes with Stanford). There is that eagerness to apply their obtained knowledge/expand on it and create something that will benefit those around them. One of the biggest differences between UK schools and USA ones would definitely be the entrepreneurial spirit (I don't see much of it at Oxbridge-correct me if I am wrong of course) Even at Imperial, there does not seem to be much of a start-up culture, and many students seem to focus their sights more on the banking industry then the tech industry. Which some students might happen to like better, and that is okay! I just find an entrepreneurial culture to be a bit more unique :P
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    I echo this so much! I've heard of so many students receiving "full ride" scholarships to MIT because their families could not afford it.
    Don't understimate the cost. If your family owns it's own home and has a reasonably good household income full-ride will not apply.

    Have you used MIT's Net Price Calculator to check?
    https://sfs.mit.edu/access-affordabi...ice-calculator
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Don't understimate the cost. If your family owns it's own home and has a reasonably good household income full-ride will not apply.

    Have you used MIT's Net Price Calculator to check?
    https://sfs.mit.edu/access-affordabi...ice-calculator
    Unfortunately I wouldn't qualify for it, but I just thought it was great how schools like MIT give out these scholarships, or how Stanford offers free education to those who make under 125k U.S. Dollars! It's incredibly nice of them to do so.
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    Unfortunately I wouldn't qualify for it, but I just thought it was great how schools like MIT give out these scholarships, or how Stanford offers free education to those who make under 125k U.S. Dollars! It's incredibly nice of them to do so.
    Stanford would only do that for US citizens
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Just reminded me of a magnet I bought a couple years ago

    Welp, that took me a while to get
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    (Original post by AwesomeSauce#1)
    Welp, that took me a while to get
    Hey at least you did!
 
 
 
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