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Can't get a job, even with first class degree watch

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    I can't secure a job with my first class degree in computer science. I have applied to so many companies but they just keep shooing me away at the first stage. Other times I don't even get a response which is really rude.

    My CV has already been checked several times by professionals so the CV is not the issue. I am good at interviews but it's just the fact that I ****ing can't pass the first stage so I don't even get a chance to be interviewed. I am applying to relevant roles as well, ones that specifically highlight that a computer science degree is a must.

    The only reason that I can think of is that my GCSE and A-Level results were poor but I thought I made amendments by getting a first class degree, that should cancel those out, right?

    All my friends on 2:2 or 2:1 with the same degree have got a job with ease. Should I declare on my CV that I graduated with a 2:1? Maybe these companies are looking for average achievers? Or maybe change my name to John Smith so I don't sound so Asian? I don't know!!

    It really is making me furious, because I worked so hard for this ****ing degree and I can't get a job. I want to give up and just find a job behind the counter at KFC because that's what I feel like right now.

    It's just so depressing because i feel unwanted and useless.
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    Do you have any work experience?

    What about trying to enter the workforce from a slightly lower point than where you are currently aiming, just to get your foot in the door. After a few months start applying for higher level positions. Getting work is always easier when you have work already. Daft I know, but true.

    Don't despair, keep trying, but from a slightly different angle.
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    Assuming you are applying for the right level of job, hen your cv is obvously weaker than the competition or your targeting is wrong.

    I thought most jobs were via application forms these days? In any event you can always improve your cv by gaining furtehr experiecne amd focusing on your skills.
    Maybe join a job club so you cna get some suppport? Hang in there, get smart and just do the basics well.

    One word of warning is to make sure you know how to do an interview ehn you eventually get one. Hang in there.
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    What are you applying for? For a lot of companies (especially those which recruit from unis before final degree results) the first sift is based on A levels. That said, if you have poor A levels and a first from a not particularly well regarded uni then the uni may be the issue (although if others have jobs probably not unless they aimed lower than you). Don't give up. Your best bet is to keep at it but consider lowering your expectations for at least some applications to get in and get some experience. And while you're applying the working at KFC idea isn't all that bad. It's customer facing employment experience, and if you take it seriously and do well/get promoted it shows that you have what it takes to succeed in the workplace.
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    Work experience.
    So many kids going to university, thinking if they get top marks they'll get the best, well not best but "decent" paid jobs, not the case for most when you haven't got work experience.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can't secure a job with my first class degree in computer science. I have applied to so many companies but they just keep shooing me away at the first stage. Other times I don't even get a response which is really rude.

    My CV has already been checked several times by professionals so the CV is not the issue. I am good at interviews but it's just the fact that I ****ing can't pass the first stage so I don't even get a chance to be interviewed. I am applying to relevant roles as well, ones that specifically highlight that a computer science degree is a must.

    The only reason that I can think of is that my GCSE and A-Level results were poor but I thought I made amendments by getting a first class degree, that should cancel those out, right?

    All my friends on 2:2 or 2:1 with the same degree have got a job with ease. Should I declare on my CV that I graduated with a 2:1? Maybe these companies are looking for average achievers? Or maybe change my name to John Smith so I don't sound so Asian? I don't know!!

    It really is making me furious, because I worked so hard for this ****ing degree and I can't get a job. I want to give up and just find a job behind the counter at KFC because that's what I feel like right now.

    It's just so depressing because i feel unwanted and useless.
    What is your degree in OP?
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    (Original post by RME11)
    What is your degree in OP?
    just read the 1st sentence, lol.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can't secure a job with my first class degree in computer science. I have applied to so many companies but they just keep shooing me away at the first stage. Other times I don't even get a response which is really rude.

    My CV has already been checked several times by professionals so the CV is not the issue. I am good at interviews but it's just the fact that I ****ing can't pass the first stage so I don't even get a chance to be interviewed. I am applying to relevant roles as well, ones that specifically highlight that a computer science degree is a must.

    The only reason that I can think of is that my GCSE and A-Level results were poor but I thought I made amendments by getting a first class degree, that should cancel those out, right?

    All my friends on 2:2 or 2:1 with the same degree have got a job with ease. Should I declare on my CV that I graduated with a 2:1? Maybe these companies are looking for average achievers? Or maybe change my name to John Smith so I don't sound so Asian? I don't know!!

    It really is making me furious, because I worked so hard for this ****ing degree and I can't get a job. I want to give up and just find a job behind the counter at KFC because that's what I feel like right now.

    It's just so depressing because i feel unwanted and useless.
    'Poor" a-levels is not very specific, we need grades. Also, which uni you graduated from? Some firms filter applicants out by simply creating a cut-off point in terms of UCAS points, or look at the name of the uni and if its meh, reject your app straight away.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    just read the 1st sentence, lol.
    God knows how I missed that haha.

    That's pretty mental, computer science is an excellent degree.

    I come from a merchant navy background, and one of the only roles that isn't grossly flooded and they need more people is tech/network support technicians for massive cruise vessels and superyachts - on the latter they are extremely generous in pay (usually 5000 EUR a month+) for a onboard computer tech guy, since electricians and engineers generally don't have a clue when it comes to maintaining onboard software/computer systems. You may need to do some additional training but for the salaries they are offering you could pay off the fees in a couple of months, major cruise companies may be willing to put you through it.

    http://www.seacareer.com/i5394/av-it...-7000-eur-p-m/

    http://www.seacareer.com/i5387/audio...it-specialist/
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    you say your CV is good but are your actual applications good because most of the time that is about more than a CV, it is demonstrating you meet the person spec, answering situation questions etc

    also, if you have never had a job or if you graduated last summer, you should get that job in kfc (or anywhere) as it's better to be employed than unemployed and it will give you experience of work
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    Lol at memecuck OP who thinks a first actually matter. As long as you got at least a 2:1 employers dont give a chit what your degree class is.

    If you're repeatedly getting canned before even getting a first round interview then there's definitely something wrong with your CV. It might be your pre unis grades as you mentioned (maybe leave them off and just mention it if anyone asks).

    Would also see if you can get some sort of internship (even if unpaid) in the mean time while you search for jobs. Some experience is better than no experience.



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    Why not try applying to roles that don't specifically require a computer science degree? Your first would be more impressive and would stand out more.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can't secure a job with my first class degree in computer science. I have applied to so many companies but they just keep shooing me away at the first stage. Other times I don't even get a response which is really rude.
    can u code properly? (quite a few cs graduates cannot code to save their life - this is why cs has the highest unemployment rate)
    have you taken any psychometric tests for job applications? maybe you scored low.
    have you had any interviews? if so, maybe you need to work on your social skills.
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    I don't know about your friends getting a job 'with ease'.
    You are not suitable for the jobs you've applied for whether it be because someone was more experienced or someone just fit the role better.
    It's life. First class degree or no degree there will always be competition for every job.

    It's nothing to do with your GCSE's or A levels and if you got awful grades a first class may not necessarily 'cancel it out'

    I appreciate you worked hard and I'm not taking anything away from you at all, believe me. But you're not the only one with a first class and you're not the only one with a degree.

    Instead of sitting there thinking 'I have a first class I should get a job easily' how about you get some work experience? Internship? Anything at all actually.

    Sorry to be brutal but you need to just calm down and step back a bit the people you are calling 'average achievers' are the ones who have jobs now..I know you're frustrated but I think a change in mindset would actually help

    I don't know if you have any work experience? regardless of degree if someone has been studying for 3/4 years and nothing else then they don't actually have any experience to go hand in hand with it.

    Companies can't reply to everyone. Instead of getting upset about it either ask for feedback or continue to apply for other suitable jobs.

    I know absolutely nothing about computer science and what sort of things you are applying for. But just make sure they you meet the requirements for any job you look for and don't aim too high too soon. If you are applying for some crazy jobs that it would be a miracle for you to get into then you are setting yourself up for failure and wasting time when you could have invested it into a more realistic job.

    I think maybe best to get your cv checked over? And when you apply just take that little bit extra time to tailor it to each company.

    Best of luck
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    Can you code? Why not register with some recruitment agencies
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    My 5 cents:
    how about trying to find work in mainland Europe? The job market for university graduates is not so saturated as in the UK, they don't care at all about your GGCSE/A-level grades, all that counts is your uni grade, and your skills. A second language may be an advantage, but not necessary to start with, as long as you are willing to learn the language.
    Create a profile on linkedin and start networking?
    Go for management trainee opportunities with American companies?
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    So I've got a 2.1 from a good university so I guess I classify as one of your 'average achievers'. My tip: don't be proud. I got a good degree and then have ended up working in accounting. I haven't ended up working in a top company in a grad scheme, but have started at the bottom in a car dealership. I never wanted to work in the motor trade and ended up in it due to circumstance. People who have had my job before and a vast majority of the people I work with don't have degrees. My boss said to me after about a month of working "to be honest, I didn't understand half of the words on your cv, but it sounded good". Notwithstanding, I am currently doing my exams and know that long term both my degree and academic ability will mean I can forge a successful career. If I had been proud I wouldn't have taken this job, yet I now have the valuable experience that is so difficult to get nowadays.

    Also, take a step back and ask "what did I do at university?". If all you did is study and get a first, great, but you are limited in the scope of what you can apply for. I was a treasurer of a society and it is part of what got me my current job. If you were the social sec of the B's netball team, look how you can apply the skills you learned to apply to an applicable job. The other thing which may be worth doing is talking to your friends who got these good jobs. What are they doing? How did they go about getting a job? And even (this relates back to the pride thing) ask if they are hiring. If they know you and think you could be good, it might just be enough to get your foot in the door.

    Good luck.

    P.S. I don't have GCSEs and have IB (which many employers haven't heard of/don't understand), so I can't imagine your A-level achievement is that bad. I would also de-emphasise your A-levels on your cv if you think it is that much of a problem.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I can't secure a job with my first class degree in computer science. I have applied to so many companies but they just keep shooing me away at the first stage. Other times I don't even get a response which is really rude.

    My CV has already been checked several times by professionals so the CV is not the issue. I am good at interviews but it's just the fact that I ****ing can't pass the first stage so I don't even get a chance to be interviewed. I am applying to relevant roles as well, ones that specifically highlight that a computer science degree is a must.

    The only reason that I can think of is that my GCSE and A-Level results were poor but I thought I made amendments by getting a first class degree, that should cancel those out, right?

    All my friends on 2:2 or 2:1 with the same degree have got a job with ease. Should I declare on my CV that I graduated with a 2:1? Maybe these companies are looking for average achievers? Or maybe change my name to John Smith so I don't sound so Asian? I don't know!!

    It really is making me furious, because I worked so hard for this ****ing degree and I can't get a job. I want to give up and just find a job behind the counter at KFC because that's what I feel like right now.

    It's just so depressing because i feel unwanted and useless.
    I'm studying CompSci so this worries me
    Can I ask what languages do you know and to what level and where did you graduate from?
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    What university did you go to? As a prior poster has mentioned, the degree class (if at least 2:1) doesn't really make much difference. If your degree was at a lower university, I can understand some rejections. If A-level results aren't great, leave them off. There was an excellent post a couple of weeks ago (search 'computer science graduates highest unemployment') where someone wisely mentioned most CS grads aren't specific enough for a certain type of job. Maybe you could try and develop coding and programming knowledge.

    Good luck
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    You probably need to understand the logic of hiring. One of my biggest gripes with graduates is when I don't get a sense of what they want to do. They just 'want a job with computers'. Computer Science is a good degree but there's a lot of areas that includes - IT specialist, programmer, developer, system admins are vastly different roles with different approaches and only a sample of what you can do.

    It's a bit more involved than finding a job where the job spec says that CS degree is a must - you need to have a CV which expresses what area you are interested in. I worked in a call centre for a few months after graduating and left for a software engineering role after getting the first interview I got. Having experience might have helped but some of the CS grads I met there were still there 12 months after - having that job didn't make finding an IT or programming job any easier. My impression was they didn't understand the landscape of IT/CS roles, which made it hard to sell themselves.

    Also one thing I did was got advice from one of the senior supervisors who also doubled up as IT support - he was actually being paid on the side to vet a Java book for a lecturer at a local uni aswell. He really got across to me the value of marketing myself properly - for instance when he was hired as supervisor he really sold to his boss why his degree mattered i.e. he could set up the server system that we used to log and track our calls and success rates, way quicker than a non-CS person. And he did - what would have taken someone 'learning on the job' 2-3 years took him a month + he understood important aspects of the system some self taught IT specialists sometimes don't get. He got paid better than other supervisors for it.

    Selling the areas you are best at and finding roles to match, within itself is a huge plus. As would taking up side projects and using a personal website to promote yourself - at least with web development roles many hirers simply will not even speak to you unless you have a personal website of web development work and a huge online presence (LinkedIn, Twitter etc) as this promotion is what you will be doing as part of the job for their company.

    Whatever works for you may involve temping/volunteer work, but the main thing is learning to sell yourself, then you can worry about your entry point. Sometimes with degrees like CS where you don't typically do a postgrad your optimal GPA or grade is minimum required + a tiny amount, where any additional work that would have been put into getting a first is put into summer jobs etc instead. But you can't change the past, just try your best. The thing is, getting a first only really matters when it's for a specialist MSc like quant finance where you might actually use what you learnt in the job. Getting a CS graduate degree just means you can "work with computers".
 
 
 
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