Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Can't get a job, even with first class degree Watch

    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    Experience is the key

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I don't buy into the university prestige talk. I have had high ranking, good salaried employment without a degree and know of many others with similar experience. As previous posters have said, it boils down to having and demonstrating (in your application form/cv/interview/assessment centre) relevant and strong experience and skill sets. Work on improving that OP.

    University ranking is more of an ego massage than a significant recruitment factor.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    I know a load of people who have First class degrees from a very low ranked local uni. The value of the degree has been devalued, and also the value of the First has. It's piss easy to get a First at low ranked unis.

    It's not so much that your A-levels and GCSEs let you down, but you probably went to a uni where getting a First doesn't mean much.

    You think that declaring yourself as having a 2:1 will make a difference? That's conceited. Like I said, no one really cares about a First if it's from a shite uni. So many of the thick kids in my old school ended up with a First it's laughable. But employers know the difference.

    Instead of changing your degree classification, it would be better to change where you studied.
    No no, I'm pretty sure OP lacks experience and prior examples of work. Not because of the lack of 'prestige' of their degree.

    This is all just standard TSR rhetoric - it's really not all that important for web development and design careers. I would know, I've run my own side consultancy (and hired people) doing just that.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I did a work experience placement at a web development company - they said they recruit entirely based on skills, and couldn't care less whether you have a first class degree or are entirely self-taught.

    It's all about building up an impressive portfolio in this sector, not an impressive CV.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No no, I'm pretty sure OP lacks experience and prior examples of work. Not because of the lack of 'prestige' of their degree.

    This is all just standard TSR rhetoric - it's really not all that important for web development and design careers. I would know, I've run my own side consultancy (and hired people) doing just that.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well it's both isn't it. Both the prestige of the degree and his work experience will increase his chances, but obviously one can be changed and the other cannot.

    All I'm saying is, people think that a First from a low ranking uni is an automatic ticket to immediate success, it is not. It's not just typical TSR thinking, I've heard this from solicitors, teachers, insurance brokers, academics. You have to work a hell of a lot harder for a degree from a more "prestige" institution, and professionals are aware of that.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Well it's both isn't it. Both the prestige of the degree and his work experience will increase his chances, but obviously one can be changed and the other cannot.

    All I'm saying is, people think that a First from a low ranking uni is an automatic ticket to immediate success, it is not. It's not just typical TSR thinking, I've heard this from solicitors, teachers, insurance brokers, academics. You have to work a hell of a lot harder for a degree from a more "prestige" institution, and professionals are aware of that.
    No it's not. I am telling you as someone that's done 100+ web dev/web design projects over the past 3 years - hiring 5-6 times, prestige doesn't come into play. You're making broad, sweeping statements that don't apply to OP's situation at all.

    If they were wanting to get into say, IB/corporate law/consulting, sure. But they want to do web dev/design. A field you ABSOLUTELY have to have prior examples of work in order to have any success in gaining employment, which is completely possible if OP used the resources available online to get a headstart.

    Add to the irrelevance of the usual 'prestige matters' rhetoric without actually helping the OP if you want, it's a free world. Just know that what you've said is that: irrelevant.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    If you're going down the software development route, program, that's the best advice. Get a github page, learn how to use version control and start developing impressive programs. That's what employers want to see, your ability to program.

    Work experience is even more important, but for some junior programming jobs they don't require experience, as long as you're proficient in the appropriate programming languages they want you to use.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Andy98)
    Experience is the key

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    :ditto:

    But thats the problem most graduates have these days. They're sucked into the traditional 'I have a 1st class degree, I will and deserve to get a job' trap.
    Well we all now know and learned a degree isn't the ticket straight to employment these days. Thats life and you need to learn the hard way.

    I know some of my former course mates who have graduated with a 1st and 2.1s and they have stayed in their part time jobs (which I'm assuming is now full time?) so really they haven't actually moved on with their degree.
    Whereas for me, I've worked hard not only on achieving my degree but actually persistently gaining real practical experience of what I really want to do.
    Then when I did a paid work experience at my local Jobcentre I had a person who graduated the same year as me, but was claiming benefits. As you would expect, he unsurprisingly never worked in his life and he felt that he didn't deserve to work for free. Well how exactly are you going to get a job without any experience?
    Basically he thought he deserved the free money that was being offered. I really showed him that this wasn't the case. I helped him get a placement (volunteering) at a renowned charity and he just rejected it without any gratitude to me. Long story short, he never attended any of his placements and lets put it this way, he clearly wasn't a happy bunny (I stopped his benefits as a result of not attending his placement) and that was the end of that story.

    I mean how is that fair that I have to work for my money and he doesn't have to do anything for it?!

    You can always have the option of moaning and complaining that no one wants to employ you because that will give you practical work experience...or actually getting off your backside and actively look for that experience and get on with your life.

    What is it going to be? That is the question that you really need to be asking yourself.

    Rant over.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I am at the end of year one of my BSc and just gained a paid part time role relevant to my studies. My eyes are on the ball of standing out as a viable candidate for a post graduate doctorate course.

    A group of fellow students were asking me how and why I had found 'such a demanding' role to do alongside our course. My answer was 1) it's not demanding if it's something you are passionate about; and, 2) I know what I want to be doing career wise and it's not going to come to me, I need to pursue it. There was a lot of eye-rolling on their part. I am betting that they will be complaining about how useless a degree is after graduating.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Welcome Squad
    (Original post by Boreism)
    :ditto:

    But thats the problem most graduates have these days. They're sucked into the traditional 'I have a 1st class degree, I will and deserve to get a job' trap.
    Well we all now know and learned a degree isn't the ticket straight to employment these days. Thats life and you need to learn the hard way.

    I know some of my former course mates who have graduated with a 1st and 2.1s and they have stayed in their part time jobs (which I'm assuming is now full time?) so really they haven't actually moved on with their degree.
    Whereas for me, I've worked hard not only on achieving my degree but actually persistently gaining real practical experience of what I really want to do.
    Then when I did a paid work experience at my local Jobcentre I had a person who graduated the same year as me, but was claiming benefits. As you would expect, he unsurprisingly never worked in his life and he felt that he didn't deserve to work for free. Well how exactly are you going to get a job without any experience?
    Basically he thought he deserved the free money that was being offered. I really showed him that this wasn't the case. I helped him get a placement (volunteering) at a renowned charity and he just rejected it without any gratitude to me. Long story short, he never attended any of his placements and lets put it this way, he clearly wasn't a happy bunny (I stopped his benefits as a result of not attending his placement) and that was the end of that story.

    I mean how is that fair that I have to work for my money and he doesn't have to do anything for it?!

    You can always have the option of moaning and complaining that no one wants to employ you because that will give you practical work experience...or actually getting off your backside and actively look for that experience and get on with your life.

    What is it going to be? That is the question that you really need to be asking yourself.

    Rant over.
    Hence, I'm doing unpaid stuff before I go to uni.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Do you have work experience?

    I also agree with the people who said create a github account, start using version control and create impressive programs and also do open source projects.. Tailer your CV for each job, you can always learn a new language such as Python, C# to enable you to get jobs in those specific programming languages.

    Look at this thread to help you get into programming, developer roles: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4072475

    Good luck!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    which is why I was offered interviews at so many places. unfortunately I have social anxiety problems so I kept freezing at interviews and literally as soon as the interview was over, then Id had the answers
    Now that you have identified a problem, look at ways of tackling it. Get your friends / family to give you mock interviews. Go to your careers office and get them to interview. Practice, practice, practice. Employers are not looking for the complete package in terms of your technical skills but they are looking for a face that fits. If you are getting interviews but not jobs, your skills are clearly fine, but you need to come across as personable. Sadly, the days of eccentric devs who sit in a corner hacking away are long gone. Software development is much more social and collaborative so you need to work on your anxiety so that it doesn't appear in your interview.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    All my friends on 2:2 or 2:1 with the same degree have got a job with ease. Should I declare on my CV that I graduated with a 2:1? .
    That's what I did and it worked for me!

    Spoiler:
    Show

    though I really got a 2:2
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    It's stupid bureaucracy which does it. You e clearly performed well enough on the day that even the interviewers like and want to hire you but they are hamstrung by the stupid criteria. There is no discretion or autonomy anymore, it's all a box ticking exercise. These recruiters are also very unscrupulous, they know they will hire a couple of people yet lie and tell you things like there is no cap on the amount of people we can take, it's disgusting behaviour and a total insult to people that travel 5-7 hours either way. The audacity when they don't give you a call or even some feedback is disgusting. Just have low expectations when you finish uni this way it's not such a depressing thing be happy and don't let this system bring you down!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CCC75)
    I don't buy into the university prestige talk. I have had high ranking, good salaried employment without a degree and know of many others with similar experience. As previous posters have said, it boils down to having and demonstrating (in your application form/cv/interview/assessment centre) relevant and strong experience and skill sets. Work on improving that OP.

    University ranking is more of an ego massage than a significant recruitment factor.
    I totally agree! I don't understand why anyone even cares what university you went to, university is university. Study where and what you want and where suits you, who cares if it "looks good"?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Boreism)
    :ditto:

    But thats the problem most graduates have these days. They're sucked into the traditional 'I have a 1st class degree, I will and deserve to get a job' trap.
    Well we all now know and learned a degree isn't the ticket straight to employment these days. Thats life and you need to learn the hard way.

    I know some of my former course mates who have graduated with a 1st and 2.1s and they have stayed in their part time jobs (which I'm assuming is now full time?) so really they haven't actually moved on with their degree.
    Whereas for me, I've worked hard not only on achieving my degree but actually persistently gaining real practical experience of what I really want to do.
    Then when I did a paid work experience at my local Jobcentre I had a person who graduated the same year as me, but was claiming benefits. As you would expect, he unsurprisingly never worked in his life and he felt that he didn't deserve to work for free. Well how exactly are you going to get a job without any experience?
    Basically he thought he deserved the free money that was being offered. I really showed him that this wasn't the case. I helped him get a placement (volunteering) at a renowned charity and he just rejected it without any gratitude to me. Long story short, he never attended any of his placements and lets put it this way, he clearly wasn't a happy bunny (I stopped his benefits as a result of not attending his placement) and that was the end of that story.

    I mean how is that fair that I have to work for my money and he doesn't have to do anything for it?!

    You can always have the option of moaning and complaining that no one wants to employ you because that will give you practical work experience...or actually getting off your backside and actively look for that experience and get on with your life.

    What is it going to be? That is the question that you really need to be asking yourself.

    Rant over.
    That's not very helpful.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PenniedDays)
    I totally agree! I don't understand why anyone even cares what university you went to, university is university. Study where and what you want and where suits you, who cares if it "looks good"?

    Higher ranking universities are more academically rigorous, that's why they are more respected.

    Compare the quality of work for the same degree from a top and low ranking university, and you'd see a clear difference in the difficulty of content, and also the academic standard to what you are expected to perform at.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    if you really actually like programming you would probably already have a portfolio of a few things you've made, a github profile and other 'proof' that you know what you purport to know

    employers must assume everyone who says they know how to program does not, because they do not have time to waste - too many liars will say anything to get interviews hoping to wing it, and when it comes down to it can't program the most basic of programs

    if you can't program a website/service/api etc and you want to work as a web developer or similar, you really, seriously need to ask yourself what do you want to do in life?, because it's clearly not programming.

    I'm saying this because I've worked as a software developer for several years now, and i would absolutely love if I had time to work on personal projects and learn any technology I wanted (you have the absolute free choice right now, literally right now and indefinitely until you find employment, to learn python, Go, Swift, .NET, node, express, angular etc etc.. and other stuff which employers value but is rarely mentioned - proficiency with unix/linux/windows command line,shells, OSes, knowledge of how networks function, DB knowledge, automation and testing etc).

    basically if you really want a job like this, you need to be able to prove stone cold, no question, no argument, that you have these skills.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Develop projects and put them on GitHub.

    Theirs plenty of demand for C#, Java, JavaScript jobs so develop projects in that. Aim to develop 5-6.

    For Java since Andriod is Java centric develop android apps.

    Contributing on open source projects and answering questions on Stackoverflow can make your CV even more atttactive.
    Offline

    21
    (Original post by Joshale)
    Work experience.
    So many kids going to university, thinking if they get top marks they'll get the best, well not best but "decent" paid jobs, not the case for most when you haven't got work experience.
    Yeah its f'in gay! Substantial time, effort and money spent going to uni, only for it all to backfire by basically being given the big F.O by employers. If experience is key (it generally is), then what benefit is there in going to uni?
    What I imagine happens is employers take on people they already know and put them through the necessary training processes. That, and people who have already been trained and experienced.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources
    Bizarre things students have spent their loans onThings you should budget for at uni

    Sponsored features:

    Making money from your own website

    Need some cash?

    How to make money running your own website.

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.