Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by velvetsky)
    What's your status now @FallenPetal if you don't mind me asking. Are you in community?. When did you qualify?.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    ----

    I am registered to do some odd locum work and provide advice to friends and family, but otherwise, I'm not regularly employed as a pharmacist. My background is in community though; generally speaking, for hospital to be truly worth it, you have to be willing to put years of experience in... and I wasn't.

    A PhD has been all I've ever wanted to do for the past several years, so I'm looking into doing that right now (no offers yet though ). To be honest, even pretending what's happening in the pharmacy profession right now isn't happening, I'd still leave in a heartbeat to do research, simply because one is a far better fit for me than the other. Something about it just clicks for me.

    Again, I will reiterate: Think long and hard as to whether or not you're really suited to work in a Pharmacy. I'm lucky, in that I've found something in my degree I do genuinely find interesting and can hopefully use, but trying to leave has been immensely difficult and stressful. It is a huge risk, one where I don't know whether it will pay off or not yet. I could wind up where I want to be, I could wind up back in some pharmacy somewhere, I could wind up working for some company, I could wind up working behind a bar trying to make ends meet. I just don't know.

    So, if you can avoid being in my position, you absolutely should. It really isn't fun.
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by MiloMilo)
    Very good posts, FallenPetal. Well balanced view and is pretty spot on.

    I'm a hospital pharmacist who is also retraining as a doctor... however not for financial reasons or even for stability reasons. I would actually more than happily be a hospital pharmacist for life, but I do sometimes tire of junior doctors not implementing my suggestions at times and also that frequently the higher you are as a pharmacist the more you are put in charge of high cost medicines and formularies (which is further away from patients unfortunately).

    If you find the science/communication skills behind pharmacy interesting on a day to day basis then you will gain job satisfaction. If you like owning your own business then you will also likely gain job satisfaction. If you are in it for a pay cheque and a stable job, then you will find it increasingly harder work to maintain this in pharmacy. Perhaps easier money and stability can be found elsewhere.

    A pretty reasonable summary I would think...

    If you want to do pharmacy, still do pharmacy. GP pharmacists will become more prevelant as community pharmacies close lest not forget. It isn't all doom and gloom.


    Evidence for this????!
    No offence my dear, but like another would be medic, (petzneo), you are a pharmacist who has jumped ship to be a Doctor, yet, you seem to still be saying that pharmacy isn't that bad???! So why leave then?
    Personally, if I had left pharmacy behind, (or maybe you are still doing locum work?) I wouldn't bother with this forum, I would be on the medic forums, or maybe have my head in Kumar/Clark, etc etc ?!?!?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mrlittlebigman)
    [/u][/i][/b]

    Evidence for this????!
    No offence my dear, but like another would be medic, (petzneo), you are a pharmacist who has jumped ship to be a Doctor, yet, you seem to still be saying that pharmacy isn't that bad???! So why leave then?
    Personally, if I had left pharmacy behind, (or maybe you are still doing locum work?) I wouldn't bother with this forum, I would be on the medic forums, or maybe have my head in Kumar/Clark, etc etc ?!?!?
    Still work as a locum hospital pharmacist in my university holidays and bank pharmacist during the week in free periods.

    Albeit not concrete, the future rise in GP pharmacist positions was in the news 6 months ago was it not?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FallenPetal)
    ----

    I am registered to do some odd locum work and provide advice to friends and family, but otherwise, I'm not regularly employed as a pharmacist. My background is in community though; generally speaking, for hospital to be truly worth it, you have to be willing to put years of experience in... and I wasn't.

    A PhD has been all I've ever wanted to do for the past several years, so I'm looking into doing that right now (no offers yet though ). To be honest, even pretending what's happening in the pharmacy profession right now isn't happening, I'd still leave in a heartbeat to do research, simply because one is a far better fit for me than the other. Something about it just clicks for me.

    Again, I will reiterate: Think long and hard as to whether or not you're really suited to work in a Pharmacy. I'm lucky, in that I've found something in my degree I do genuinely find interesting and can hopefully use, but trying to leave has been immensely difficult and stressful. It is a huge risk, one where I don't know whether it will pay off or not yet. I could wind up where I want to be, I could wind up back in some pharmacy somewhere, I could wind up working for some company, I could wind up working behind a bar trying to make ends meet. I just don't know.

    So, if you can avoid being in my position, you absolutely should. It really isn't fun.
    Good luck to you!.I hope everything works out well
    I'll be graduating in 2018 ( fingers crossed) so I'm already on the band wagon.
    Thankyou for sharing your experiences & for your words.For me Mpharm won't be the end, it's the start.There is more out there for me to accomplish, I love challenging myself.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by velvetsky)
    Good luck to you!.I hope everything works out well
    I'll be graduating in 2018 ( fingers crossed) so I'm already on the band wagon.
    Thankyou for sharing your experiences & for your words.For me Mpharm won't be the end, it's the start.There is more out there for me to accomplish, I love challenging myself.
    This is the perfect attitude to have if you are a current MPharm student, or a recent graduate. It doesn't have to the end of your hopes for a fulfilling and rewarding career, just be aware that it almost certainly wont be as a Pharmacist, and that there may have to be another four or so years of study after your MPharm degree. I'm not going to reiterate forever, if you want to do an MPharm in the full knowledge of what is coming in terms of community Pharmacy then good luck to you.

    If you're already doing your degree then absolutely - look towards the GP prescribing scheme. It might be great, it might disappear once the G.Ps have to pay for it from their surgery budget (or the salary might just settle in the 20ks - which if you're happy then great!).

    I think one of the most telling things is that there hasn't been one current Pharmacist who has come and said 'It's good'. The best we've managed to get is someone's cousin who said 'It's OK, but I am going to be leaving in the next 5 years' (i.e. it's going to go massively downhill over the coming 5 years), people who have realised that Pharmacy isn't for them and gone and done medicine (which is by far the best example of turning around a bad situation you could ever hope for!), and actual Pharmacists who are warning you it's awful and who have already left. In my experience of the internet people tend to big themselves up and act as cheerleaders for things - so statistically this is actually Pharmacy being painted in an overly positive light by people who are exaggerating their own quality of life and success!
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by MiloMilo)
    Still work as a locum hospital pharmacist in my university holidays and bank pharmacist during the week in free periods.

    Albeit not concrete, the future rise in GP pharmacist positions was in the news 6 months ago was it not?
    There's a project with about 400 pharmacists. No-one knows if it will take off. It has been given short term funding.
    There are 3000 pharmacy graduates a year!

    And a medical school took you on??!!
    Hope there is a good pharmacist on the ward to do the drug calculation sums for you!!

    If the GP pharmacist scheme is so good, why did you bugger off to medical school?!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.pharmacy-forum.co.uk/content/

    Most of the people on this website are actual pharmacists. Some have positive things to say, others not so much. But its great because you can get an idea of other jobs/sectors pharmacists are working in apart from the generic hospital/community/industry from people doing them.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by velvetsky)
    Good luck to you!.I hope everything works out well
    I'll be graduating in 2018 ( fingers crossed) so I'm already on the band wagon.
    Thankyou for sharing your experiences & for your words.For me Mpharm won't be the end, it's the start.There is more out there for me to accomplish, I love challenging myself.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks! This might be highly arrogant of me to say, but I honestly feel I have so much more to give than pharmacy - as you should too. While I know people to which pharmacy is a perfect fit - and I wouldn't dream of suggesting their career isn't worthwhile - I also know people who are completely wasted behind a counter checking prescriptions all day, myself included.

    I wouldn't get the best out of pharmacy, and pharmacy certainly wouldn't be getting the best out of me. There is nothing wrong with admitting that; never feel as though X amount of time and Y amount of debt obligates you to be something you're not.

    My best advice to everyone here is this: Keep an open mind going forward, and don't be scared to try new things. I learned so much during my degree having intellectual interests that were completely unrelated to pharmacy, and as a result, they made me a better and more well-rounded individual than any amount of reciting atenolol side-effects in an exam. Of course, I'm not saying you have to do this or else you'll never amount to anything else in life, but it's certainly the one thing which has helped me.

    Is this post self-serving nonsense? Yes. Absolutely it is. What I hope is that it's helpful self-serving nonsense.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I'd really love to hear the shite that Pharmacy schools spin to prospective students nowadays - they probably still talk of the "exciting clinical future" and how all their students enjoy 100% employment. The rosy picture that the Universities paint of a Pharmacist doing complicated surgery in The back of the dispensary does not exist and never has done. The reality in 2016 is that you will end up working as a drone in a Multiple sweatshop under horrendous working conditions. The talk of the great clinical future is just to get you in the door and pay tuition fees - the Professors tucked away in their Ivory towers are never going to jeopardise that by telling you he cold hard reality of life on the shop floor.
    Offline

    2
    http://www.theguardian.com/news/2016...ots-went-rogue

    http://www.theguardian.com/business/...rmacists-union

    Multiple pharmacy in 2016
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    It summarises my experience of community pharmacy very well.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    If people still are passionate to work for Boots after reading this then whatever negatives happen in their professional lives are on their head. #ostrichheadinthesandsyndrome

    As the saying goes; You can only guide the horse away from dirty water, but if they decide to turn around and jump in it then what can you do.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    As someone with experience working for big chain Pharmacy, I will chip in with my own experience. I would implore others to do the same.

    “We make it clear to our colleagues that these services [MURs/NMS/etc] should not be undertaken inappropriately.”

    Crock. Of. Horseshit.

    When you step foot in a large chain, it's not a matter of if you'll complete an entirely spurious MUR on a member of staff, but when. The fact that a manager had an MUR entirely for the sake of meeting targets made me laugh, simply because I've seen it happen before - too busy and important to let the ink dry on the form before leaving. No doubt it will happen again, in stores up and down the country, and we Pharmacists will happily oblige, if it means respite from the constant nagging about meeting targets (under duress of yet another performance review).

    I found the article to be a good reflection on what is happening in comunity pharmacy. If you are thinking of going down that path, I would implore you to read and then think long and hard if that's what you truly want to sign up for. I know that Universities will drill into your heads the importance of being an empathetic, hard-working person who is driven to do the best by their patients, but trust me, all of that goes flying out of the window in practice. You will not be judged on how much you care. You will not be judged on how hard you worked for your degree, learning everything there is to know about pharmacy. You will not even be judged on how good you are in a day-to-day Pharmacy setting.

    Five years of your life training, and you will be judged on your ability to wring yet another £28 from the NHS to line shareholder's pockets meet targets.

    I, for one, completely understand why so many Pharmacists are fed up with it, myself included.
    Offline

    2
    I haven't worked for this company for about 13 yrs, but am surprised at how awful it has actually become! There seems to be a target for absolutely everything! It's a pity really, as I was a Boots summer student, and there were many pharmacists and dispensers who had been there, their entire working lives and were very happy. It was like a family.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    ^
    I know a few Boots dispensers/healthcare assistants - people who have worked for the company since leaving school/university - and 'it used to be a really nice company to work for' is something I've heard more than once.

    Actually, come to think of it, many of them are now ex-employees.
    Offline

    2
    http://www.theguardian.com/business/...ood-of-letters
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    • “I am not allowed to just BE a pharmacist – what I have trained for and used to love so much. I am a money-making object.”
    Heartbreaking


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mrlittlebigman)
    There's a project with about 400 pharmacists. No-one knows if it will take off. It has been given short term funding.
    There are 3000 pharmacy graduates a year!

    And a medical school took you on??!!
    Hope there is a good pharmacist on the ward to do the drug calculation sums for you!!

    If the GP pharmacist scheme is so good, why did you bugger off to medical school?!
    Probably took me on for my balanced approach to considering arguments... I presume you saw this in the news recently..?

    http://www.pharmaceutical-journal.co...201055.article
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FallenPetal)
    ^
    I know a few Boots dispensers/healthcare assistants - people who have worked for the company since leaving school/university - and 'it used to be a really nice company to work for' is something I've heard more than once.

    Actually, come to think of it, many of them are now ex-employees.
    I did some weekends for Boots this year and felt like I was mocked for "wasting time" consulting with patients. Like has already been said, MUR targets take priority among other things and you are being hounded by some Store Manager whose background is in selling perfumes.

    We all need a prod in the right direction occasionally but think the Boots way is very hard to digest.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MiloMilo)
    I did some weekends for Boots this year and felt like I was mocked for "wasting time" consulting with patients. Like has already been said, MUR targets take priority among other things and you are being hounded by some Store Manager whose background is in selling perfumes.

    We all need a prod in the right direction occasionally but think the Boots way is very hard to digest.
    Yep. YOU are the expert on medicines, YOU are the one taking on the huge professional responsibility, and YOU are the one who has to interact with patients day-after-day.

    Yet, it is the middle management who knows best about the safe and effective running of a Pharmacy, which apparently means churning out MUR after MUR on a skeleton staff.

    I have had patients crying and angry on the phone with me, because once again, their delivery of medications has been missed - and there is nothing I can do, simply because there isn't enough time in the day or people on hand to fix a Pharmacy which is drastically behind and poorly organized.

    ...meanwhile, said manager is scowling over some spreadsheet which says we've spent too much already this year and need to sign more people up to service X, completely oblivious to the water pouring in from all sides; the ship is going down, and unfortunately, your captain is an incompetent buffoon who has only ever attended a two-day course on seamanship.

    Also, this absolutely needs posting here: http://www.theguardian.com/business/...al-council-nhs

    It's not just us. It seems many pharmacists feel the same way, that Boots has transformed from a patient-focused company to a money-racketeering operation; it no longer exists to serve the healthcare needs of the community, it exists to line shareholders pockets. Can we really blame these bullied and broken-down people for speaking out? I certainly can't.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.