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    I was thinking about not living in student accommodation but instead renting a flat with my boyfriend. However, I am being continuously told that doing so would be a bad idea by my family and a couple of my friends. They claim that it creates barriers to building friendships and that I would be isolated from the full uni student lifestyle.

    The way I see it there are tonnes of benefits of not living in student accommodation. I've done some research into the financial implications of doing so and it appears that it would actually be cheaper for me to rent with him.

    Also I just feel that having your own place provides a far better, more peaceful working environment. Noise can effect studying and sleep and thus effect grades, as supported by multiple psychological studies. Uni accommodation is notoriously loud. If I were to rent there would be no major sound disturbance as only me and my boyfriend would be living in the property, meaning we can control sound levels and allocate time to silent work/ study. Our study/ work periods would coincide so there would be no additional distractions. Students often have parties in student accommodation, creating an additional sound disturbance and distraction. This would not be the case in my own apartment.

    Also having your own place would mean that you have complete control of its cleanliness. If you are in student accommodation and you have one uncleanly person, then the whole communal area would become a tip.

    Anyway, surely I can just make friends around campus and on my course, which in many ways would be better as you are not forced into bonding with a group of people you otherwise might not have chosen to interact with.

    What are your opinions?
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    (Original post by isobel.hart)
    I was thinking about not living in student accommodation but instead renting a flat with my boyfriend. However, I am being continuously told that doing so would be a bad idea by my family and a couple of my friends. They claim that it creates barriers to building friendships and that I would be isolated from the full uni student lifestyle.

    The way I see it there are tonnes of benefits of not living in student accommodation. I've done some research into the financial implications of doing so and it appears that it would actually be cheaper for me to rent with him.

    Also I just feel that having your own place provides a far better, more peaceful working environment. Noise can effect studying and sleep and thus effect grades, as supported by multiple psychological studies. Uni accommodation is notoriously loud. If I were to rent there would be no major sound disturbance as only me and my boyfriend would be living in the property, meaning we can control sound levels and allocate time to silent work/ study. Our study/ work periods would coincide so there would be no additional distractions. Students often have parties in student accommodation, creating an additional sound disturbance and distraction. This would not be the case in my own apartment.

    Also having your own place would mean that you have complete control of its cleanliness. If you are in student accommodation and you have one uncleanly person, then the whole communal area would become a tip.

    Anyway, surely I can just make friends around campus and on my course, which in many ways would be better as you are not forced into bonding with a group of people you otherwise might not have chosen to interact with.

    What are your opinions?
    Hi Isobel,

    I've been staying in private accomodation with my girlfriend since the first year and it's been great! All of the things that you mentioned benefited us and we're still going strong in my final year/ her masters degree. We lived together whilst I was on placement too which gave us the experience of what it's going to be like when we're both full-time!

    People will make comments (both family and people you meet at Uni), but it really doesn't hinder your experience. First year was the worst for it because it's not norm, but come the second and third year it's not even spoken about- I think people get used to it and calm down a bit! I met loads of people through my seminar, getting involved in clubs and societies and just generally throwing myself into the University experience.

    Something you touched on that I really benefited from was being able to be myself. I had a support mechanism in my girlfriend that others might not have at University, or find themselves trying to fit into particular groups to gain that support. Being the person I am I needed that taking such a big step.

    All the best with whatever choice you take. Uni is a great experience in general!

    Steve
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    I'd feel as though you're missing out on a lot, From what I've heard you make a fair few friends from halls and it's a big, enjoyable (for some) part of Uni life.

    Also, although this is very pessimistic, on the off chance that you split with your boyfriend how will you cope with the cost of living? You won't be able to go into halls mid-year and a lot of student accommodation will already be taken.
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    I think you're missing out on the uni experience personally, where are you going to make friends if you're sat elsewhere? What if your boyfriend runs into debt or you split up where are you going to go from there? Are you 100% sure you want to live with him?- it's perfectly normal to admit you'd rather wait a while before living with him.

    If you can answer these questions properly then yeh go for it but relationships are unpredictable so think about it seriously. Women have the privilege to have control over the majority of the relationship so if you don't feel ready to live with him then stand your ground, he'd understand I'm sure
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    (Original post by isobel.hart)
    I was thinking about not living in student accommodation but instead renting a flat with my boyfriend. However, I am being continuously told that doing so would be a bad idea by my family and a couple of my friends. They claim that it creates barriers to building friendships and that I would be isolated from the full uni student lifestyle.

    The way I see it there are tonnes of benefits of not living in student accommodation. I've done some research into the financial implications of doing so and it appears that it would actually be cheaper for me to rent with him.

    Also I just feel that having your own place provides a far better, more peaceful working environment. Noise can effect studying and sleep and thus effect grades, as supported by multiple psychological studies. Uni accommodation is notoriously loud. If I were to rent there would be no major sound disturbance as only me and my boyfriend would be living in the property, meaning we can control sound levels and allocate time to silent work/ study. Our study/ work periods would coincide so there would be no additional distractions. Students often have parties in student accommodation, creating an additional sound disturbance and distraction. This would not be the case in my own apartment.

    Also having your own place would mean that you have complete control of its cleanliness. If you are in student accommodation and you have one uncleanly person, then the whole communal area would become a tip.

    Anyway, surely I can just make friends around campus and on my course, which in many ways would be better as you are not forced into bonding with a group of people you otherwise might not have chosen to interact with.

    What are your opinions?
    Are you actually in uni? you seem to have a very stereotypical view of what student life is like i can count on 1 finger how many disturbed nights I had in student accommodation and parties happen more in a house than in student halls and yes not staying in halls does not help making friends by all means stay with him in second and 3rd year but I implore you stay in halls first year it's much better and sounds like you need it.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    Are you actually in uni? you seem to have a very stereotypical view of what student life is like i can count on 1 finger how many disturbed nights I had in student accommodation and parties happen more in a house than in student halls and yes not staying in halls does not help making friends by all means stay with him in second and 3rd year but I implore you stay in halls first year it's much better and sounds like you need it.

    That may have been the experience you had, but some people have much more negative ones. I was constantly kept awake in halls and it very negativly affected my uni work not to mention my health.

    I'm not saying OP shouldn't live in halls. But noise is definitely something to take into account.
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    It's a fairly high risk option. You're moving in together for the first time, you're in a new environment which has a propensity to change people significantly, you won't have what is normally your first group of friends there and instead will be relying on your boyfriend more as it takes a while to make as good friends elsewhere, even in your course. It has the potential to get very lonely. A flat could be quieter but get the wrong location and it can be a lot worse, there are usually student accommodations which have a reputation for being quieter so you could choose those?
 
 
 
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