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    Looking at buying a new laptop that I wish to use for my mechanical engineering course which I will start this year. What do most people on this course use and which is better?
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    (Original post by marenghimatt)
    Looking at buying a new laptop that I wish to use for my mechanical engineering course which I will start this year. What do most people on this course use and which is better?
    I've moved this to the Engineering forum for you You'll get better responses here.
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    Thank you
    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    I've moved this to the Engineering forum for you You'll get better responses here.
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    It doesn't really matter. If you're definitely buying a new laptop (your department will have lots of computers available anyway) then just pick one that you like; lots of students get Macbooks but I couldn't tell you why. If you did get one you could dual boot to ensure you can use the programs you need, getting a Windows OS if your university is part of the Microsoft DreamSpark program.
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    You'll be fine with either, although I'm going to put Windows on my MacBook because in 3rd year I'm having to use a lot of Windows based software for my dissertation, but that's just my specific use case. I've had no problems doing uni work on the library computers for Solidworks projects and stuff! Whichever one you like best is what you should get
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    (Original post by marenghimatt)
    Looking at buying a new laptop that I wish to use for my mechanical engineering course which I will start this year. What do most people on this course use and which is better?
    Hey!

    As already said, it's mainly up to you and your preferences. Your university should offer plenty of computing labs with up-to-date software so, technically, you won't ever really need to use your laptop for coursework. Saying that, having a laptop to work from home can be very nice, particularly at weekends.

    Both Macs and laptops that run Windows have their benefits and drawbacks, much of which can be worked around. The main issue with Macs comes from the fact that some software won't run on its operating system, but, again as said, this can be worked around. I have plenty of friends who use Macs for Mechanical Engineering and they've never really had an issue. I, personally, prefer laptops with Windows, especially since it's very easy to make custom specs.

    It all just comes down to preference really. Hope this helps!

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    If you have no sort of Windows computer at all then you should probably get a Windows laptop. It's true that if you get a Mac and you have to use program which isn't available on a Mac, you can always go to computer labs, but the thing is if it's getting to deadlines, you won't be the only one wanting to use the computer labs (especially for solidworks types assignments as almost all engineers will be doing it) so the labs can be full. Or for example this year I had a solidworks assignment which was due right after Christmas, I couldn't do it over Christmas because I have a Mac, and when I came to uni the labs were closed and was reopened the day it was due in, so that was inconvenient.

    On the other hand, it depends how much you have to spend on the Mac. Because there's the option of getting a Mac and building a really cheap but fast Windows PC, that's what I have currently. macs are around 850£ for base MacBook Pro, then if you have enough you can build an AMD PC. I built mine when back in year 12 for £300 and and still runs pretty fast now so you can even build one for cheaper. Because macs are very handy, lightweight, I never take chargers to uni, some of my friends with Windows laptop's either run out of battery or have to carry one around and are always looking for charging sockets in library. But if you don't wanna go through the trouble of building a PC yourself or don't have the budget then get a Windows laptop.


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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    If you have no sort of Windows computer at all then you should probably get a Windows laptop. It's true that if you get a Mac and you have to use program which isn't available on a Mac...
    Bootcamp.

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    It just comes down to your preference for OS. Go down to a store and check if you prefer OS X or Windows. Its pretty easy to bootcamp windows on a mac so that shouldn't be a problem for you.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Bootcamp.

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    Yes I suppose so, but I dont like the idea of dual booting as you have to partition the harddrive (which is already not much) so you will have less space for the OS X system. Your most used OS will get full whilst the other one will have ton of space you cant use unless you switch os's completely/ delete the bootcamp partition and attempt to merge it which isnt fun
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Yes I suppose so, but I dont like the idea of dual booting as you have to partition the harddrive (which is already not much) so you will have less space for the OS X system. Your most used OS will get full whilst the other one will have ton of space you cant use unless you switch os's completely/ delete the bootcamp partition and attempt to merge it which isnt fun
    You don't need a 50:50 partition.

    Also it's possible (but not officially recommended) to run bootcamp on an external harddrive.
 
 
 
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