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    Hi everyone!

    I just wanted to find out if anyone is/has experienced the same sorts of doubts as me...

    I was fortunate to be offered a place on a Schools Direct course and one on a university-led PGCE. At the time I had a better feeling about the former and liked the idea of being within the school environment from day 1. Plus I had reservations about the university in question after some very mixed reviews. So I chose the Schools Direct route. I'm currently volunteering in a local primary school and suddenly the thought of "training on the job" is really worrying me.
    I have always enjoyed academia and the structure of a university course...so maybe it's the stepping into the unknown (my self-confidence is definately lacking).

    I've no idea if I would be in any position to change courses now but I would appreciate hearing anyone's thoughts/their own experiences...

    Thanks!

    Lizzie
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    As a current SD/SCITT student, and from hearing and speaking to others on a uni-based course, I know I made the right choice for me. As a person that had only spent 4 days in a school before starting, I was very much an outsider to the world of education. However, I'm still going, and was close to receiving an 'Outstanding' grade on my most recent formal observation (although that doesn't really mean much once training is over!). After only 6 months in school and education as a whole, I am having only the usual stresses that come with the job.

    The real thing that has helped has been the level of support and guidance that has been afforded to me through my placements and lead school. If the SD place you accepted seemed like the better choice for reasons like that, then don't worry. Nerves are completely normal and (to a degree) should be acknowledged then ignored, in my opinion. Obviously serious concerns should be acknowledged, but only you know when things are serious enough to need to do something about them.

    People I've met on the PGCE say that it's all very well doing theory, but sometimes they are frustrated at the uni parts, when actually they just want to be on placement and getting on with it. A few of them have said that they have learned more on placement than in uni... but it really is a personal preference!
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    QUOTE=beanbrain;63186443]As a current SD/SCITT student, and from hearing and speaking to others on a uni-based course, I know I made the right choice for me. As a person that had only spent 4 days in a school before starting, I was very much an outsider to the world of education. However, I'm still going, and was close to receiving an 'Outstanding' grade on my most recent formal observation (although that doesn't really mean much once training is over!). After only 6 months in school and education as a whole, I am having only the usual stresses that come with the job.

    The real thing that has helped has been the level of support and guidance that has been afforded to me through my placements and lead school. If the SD place you accepted seemed like the better choice for reasons like that, then don't worry. Nerves are completely normal and (to a degree) should be acknowledged then ignored, in my opinion. Obviously serious concerns should be acknowledged, but only you know when things are serious enough to need to do something about them.

    People I've met on the PGCE say that it's all very well doing theory, but sometimes they are frustrated at the uni parts, when actually they just want to be on placement and getting on with it. A few of them have said that they have learned more on placement than in uni... but it really is a personal preference![/QUOTE]

    Wow Thankyou bean brain for taking the time to reply so honestly & sensitively. I can't tell you how much your message has reassured me. I think you're right - a lot of the nerves are "natural"... certainly the SD course seems a good one & my gut instinct told me to go for it as opposed to the PGCE. So far the one piece of consistent advice from current practitioners has been "you learn more in the classroom than reading a book". Congratulations on your achievements! It's also heartening to hear such a positive outlook on teacher training. There is so much bad press! Good luck with the rest of your training & thankyou.
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    I think it depends very much on the SD provider. The only difference I'll be doing through SD and the Uni PGCE route (both involve the same Uni) is 8 teacher development days will be done with other trainees in the school vs 8 days at Uni. The SD placement is intended to help you become part of the school family as early as possible and I know where my placements will be (but I wouldn't if I was Uni-based).
    Finally as a career changer, it feels good to be in the work setting to begin with.
    Each of us is different, so horses for courses and all that. 😀
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    (Original post by VelmaStaplebot)
    I think it depends very much on the SD provider. The only difference I'll be doing through SD and the Uni PGCE route (both involve the same Uni) is 8 teacher development days will be done with other trainees in the school vs 8 days at Uni. The SD placement is intended to help you become part of the school family as early as possible and I know where my placements will be (but I wouldn't if I was Uni-based).
    Finally as a career changer, it feels good to be in the work setting to begin with.
    Each of us is different, so horses for courses and all that. 😀
    Exactly - we're all different. I don't know anyone personally who has gone down the SD route; my teaching pals all did the PGCE. Without sounding silly I spent so much time explaining & maybe justifying the SD to those who didn't know what it was that I started to wonder if I'd made the right choice. But I always preferred the idea of being in a school environment, seeing the year evolve from day 1 & getting to know the children more importantly. Thankyou for replying! It's really reassured me that I've made the right decision. I don't know unless I try!
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    Happy to help 😀 and good for you! Here's to a successful Teacher Training year for us, and everyone else too.
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    (Original post by VelmaStaplebot)
    Happy to help 😀 and good for you! Here's to a successful Teacher Training year for us, and everyone else too.
    Hear hear!
 
 
 
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