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    Hi, I've got a dilemma, well sort of.
    I do biology psychology and sociology at a level and have always decided that biology is what I want to do at uni. I've always been interested in being a vet by never thought I was good enough.
    However I've got a job at my local pet store and it's made me realise it's what I want to do.
    Here's the problem
    1) I'm in A2, have already applied for uni for biology and got my offers back etc (one of these is for biology at Nottingham, AAA, which I got at AS)
    2) I don't do a level chemistry which is one of the requirements
    3) it's too late to change I think, but could I do it next year?

    What are my options to be a vet...
    I know I need a degree but how, does this make sense? I'm basically trying to change too late, if I contact the uni will there be anyway of getting swapped? What about once I get there? What about taking a gap year and reapplying next year? What about doing it after my biology degree? HELP!!
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    Have you spent any time in a vets? Often the reality of the job is very different to what is perceived so I would first suggest spending a good 3 or 4 weeks in two clinics to find out if it is the job for you; not being harsh but a job in a pet shop is very different to working as a vet.
    You will also need to carry out lengthy husbandry based work experience on farms doing things such as lambing, milking and at kennels, stables, abattoir etc.

    You won't be able to 'swap into vet med' now or once you start a different degree scheme so if you decide veterinary is for you, I would take a gap year to sit the Chemistry A Level and gain a variety of work experience.
    It's been years since I looked at them but there may be some foundation/Year Zero courses which offer places to students without Chemistry but you'd have to check with each university.
    As you say, another option is to complete the Biology degree and apply for graduate entry (which is what I did) but they will still look at your A Levels and it's a long and expensive route.
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    (Original post by lwescott)
    Have you spent any time in a vets? Often the reality of the job is very different to what is perceived so I would first suggest spending a good 3 or 4 weeks in two clinics to find out if it is the job for you; not being harsh but a job in a pet shop is very different to working as a vet.
    You will also need to carry out lengthy husbandry based work experience on farms doing things such as lambing, milking and at kennels, stables, abattoir etc.

    You won't be able to 'swap into vet med' now or once you start a different degree scheme so if you decide veterinary is for you, I would take a gap year to sit the Chemistry A Level and gain a variety of work experience.
    It's been years since I looked at them but there may be some foundation/Year Zero courses which offer places to students without Chemistry but you'd have to check with each university.
    As you say, another option is to complete the Biology degree and apply for graduate entry (which is what I did) but they will still look at your A Levels and it's a long and expensive route.
    Thanks for the reply. I know it's very different which is another thing I'm worried about. But I feel it's what I want to do.
    I know it's not goin to be bunny cuddling etc, but I want a job where I can be passionate and busy everyday. I can't stand the thought of sitting in a lab or office doing the same thing day in day out. I'm a worker and I have to be busy. Combined with love for pets and medical sciences, I feel a vet may be good for me
    As you say I could be wrong. I could hate it, not be strong enough etc but I really would like to give it a bash.
    So is your advice a year out / post grad? I'm gonna call Nottingham uni which is where I would want to go on Monday
    Can you tell me details about what you do know? Are you a vet? How is it? Pros/cons? Thanks for replying
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    As Lwescott has said, I would recommend getting some work experience. Not only will this allow you to know for certain that it's what you want to do, it's also a requirement for entry onto veterinary courses. Vet schools want to admit people that they know have explored the profession and have a good idea of what to expect. Requirements vary but are highest at Liverpool, who want ten weeks' worth. I'd suggest having a read of the Big and Shiny Work Experience Bible.

    As far as getting onto the course goes, Nottingham offer a foundation year course for people who didn't do the right subject combination, but since all vet schools interview it's too late to apply for this year, vet places don't go into clearing, and they wouldn't accept a transfer from a bio degree. Your best option in my opinion would therefore be to take a year out and apply in your gap year (or a year later, if you're worried about getting enough work experience). In this year you could also do A2 chemistry to open your options up and allow you to apply to other vet schools (I know Notts is your fave, but it's competitive to get in so it might be worth increasing the number of places you apply to).
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    As Lwescott has said, I would recommend getting some work experience. Not only will this allow you to know for certain that it's what you want to do, it's also a requirement for entry onto veterinary courses. Vet schools want to admit people that they know have explored the profession and have a good idea of what to expect. Requirements vary but are highest at Liverpool, who want ten weeks' worth. I'd suggest having a read of the Big and Shiny Work Experience Bible.

    As far as getting onto the course goes, Nottingham offer a foundation year course for people who didn't do the right subject combination, but since all vet schools interview it's too late to apply for this year, vet places don't go into clearing, and they wouldn't accept a transfer from a bio degree. Your best option in my opinion would therefore be to take a year out and apply in your gap year (or a year later, if you're worried about getting enough work experience). In this year you could also do A2 chemistry to open your options up and allow you to apply to other vet schools (I know Notts is your fave, but it's competitive to get in so it might be worth increasing the number of places you apply to).
    Thanks! Would you say the degree is heavily chemistry based? By the sounds of it the gap year is my best option, and in that time I could have nutrition training and specialise into a certain animal at work, so that would surely benefit me ASwell as if I get some work experience.
    I wish I would've thought this through properly sooner, but it's better late than never!
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    (Original post by Tyler2709)
    Thanks! Would you say the degree is heavily chemistry based? By the sounds of it the gap year is my best option, and in that time I could have nutrition training and specialise into a certain animal at work, so that would surely benefit me ASwell as if I get some work experience.
    I wish I would've thought this through properly sooner, but it's better late than never!
    I'm not very far through my training but it's not hugely chemistry based, no. It's relevant to metabolism lectures and not much else.
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    100000% take a gap year or two to do chemistry and completely fill your summer this year with work exp. Liverpool need a minimum of 10 weeks and others range from 4-6. Having taken 3 years to complete your A levels this may mean that certain universities will not accept you eg Cambridge but don't let this discourage you at all and most of them will not be bothered by this! Also I'd say 50% of vet students have taken a gap year, 2 or 3 or are postgrads so don't worry about that either good luck!
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    (Original post by phoebebe96)
    100000% take a gap year or two to do chemistry and completely fill your summer this year with work exp. Liverpool need a minimum of 10 weeks and others range from 4-6. Having taken 3 years to complete your A levels this may mean that certain universities will not accept you eg Cambridge but don't let this discourage you at all and most of them will not be bothered by this! Also I'd say 50% of vet students have taken a gap year, 2 or 3 or are postgrads so don't worry about that either good luck!
    Thanks, I'm really not sure what to do
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    (Original post by Little Tail Chaser)
    I'm not very far through my training but it's not hugely chemistry based, no. It's relevant to metabolism lectures and not much else.
    Okay that's good to know- I can do Chem but don't particularly enjoy it haha
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    (Original post by Tyler2709)
    Thanks, I'm really not sure what to do
    feel free to message me if you want any advice!
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    (Original post by phoebebe96)
    feel free to message me if you want any advice!
    Thank - what are you doing at the moment? Are you in a degree or a job?
    My thing is that I know I want a job where everyday is different, I love working with animals, I love having responsibilities and pressure and making a difference. I can't stand the thought of sat behind a desk or in a lab all day everyday, not really making much difference.
    I want to be in a job where I can be proud of what I do and feel everyday that I've helped someone/an animal, and feel maybe being a vet is this sort of job?
    Definitely will aim to get work expereince over the summer, it's just scary that I may be completely changing what I want to do for the rest of my life... But it feels right
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    (Original post by Tyler2709)
    Thank - what are you doing at the moment? Are you in a degree or a job?
    My thing is that I know I want a job where everyday is different, I love working with animals, I love having responsibilities and pressure and making a difference. I can't stand the thought of sat behind a desk or in a lab all day everyday, not really making much difference.
    I want to be in a job where I can be proud of what I do and feel everyday that I've helped someone/an animal, and feel maybe being a vet is this sort of job?
    Definitely will aim to get work expereince over the summer, it's just scary that I may be completely changing what I want to do for the rest of my life... But it feels right
    So I'm in first year at Liverpool doing veterinary, I got in by quite an unconventional route haha.
    From the sounds of it, it does seem like veterinary would suit you, however don't put all your hopes into it until you have done work experience as I know it has put a lot of people off it. Also consider factors like grades/social skills/work ethic for the degree/job as well
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    (Original post by phoebebe96)
    So I'm in first year at Liverpool doing veterinary, I got in by quite an unconventional route haha.
    From the sounds of it, it does seem like veterinary would suit you, however don't put all your hopes into it until you have done work experience as I know it has put a lot of people off it. Also consider factors like grades/social skills/work ethic for the degree/job as well
    Thanks, it's just difficult because it means changing everything I've planned, and then what if I decide I don't want to be a vet? 6 years at uni for??? Is there any other jobs you can go into with it?
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    There are a variety of jobs you can do with a vet degree that aren't being a vet, most often going into research or being a government vet(so helping drawn up strategies for tackling diseases in livestock or being involved in the food industry and public health). You could also go abroad and possibly work in conservation. I think a lot of drug and research companies also like having vets as its a very good, broad science degree.
    Also, the degree isn't too chemistry heavy but an A level in it is something all vet schools require. If you do three years at A level the only two places you can't apply are Edinburgh and Cambridge but everywhere else is totally fine with it I suggest you spend this summer researching the job a little bit, read loads about it, do some work experience in vets and other animal places, but keep your offer to do biology just in case you think it's not for you; you can always ring the uni before results day and ask to defer your entry (I nearly had to do this last year for a bio degree at York)
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    (Original post by Tyler2709)
    Thanks, it's just difficult because it means changing everything I've planned, and then what if I decide I don't want to be a vet? 6 years at uni for??? Is there any other jobs you can go into with it?
    Yes it'll be difficult but not impossible.
    If you decide you do not want to be a vet then you'll find it difficult to keep up with the degree as it is difficult and the only thing keeping me going is the job at the end haha. That is a question you can only answer by doing a load of work experience to see whether you truly do want to be a vet.
    You can do loads with a veterinary degree, its very respected. You can always go into lecturing or research as well if you still wanted to be involved with veterinary but not be a vet.
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    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    There are a variety of jobs you can do with a vet degree that aren't being a vet, most often going into research or being a government vet(so helping drawn up strategies for tackling diseases in livestock or being involved in the food industry and public health). You could also go abroad and possibly work in conservation. I think a lot of drug and research companies also like having vets as its a very good, broad science degree.
    Also, the degree isn't too chemistry heavy but an A level in it is something all vet schools require. If you do three years at A level the only two places you can't apply are Edinburgh and Cambridge but everywhere else is totally fine with it I suggest you spend this summer researching the job a little bit, read loads about it, do some work experience in vets and other animal places, but keep your offer to do biology just in case you think it's not for you; you can always ring the uni before results day and ask to defer your entry (I nearly had to do this last year for a bio degree at York)
    That's good to know, however I'd have to do another 2 years at a level cause they've changed a levels so they're a 2 year course now, not an AS and then an A2 year so that would mean 2 years at a levels then 6 years at uni, or 3 at uni with biology.
    Thanks for the advice, I'm probably gonna end up sticking with biology because it's just such a jump/change and I feel it could go wrong :/
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    However I'm gonna ring unis and ask if they'd consider me without chemistry if I got good grades, and possibly if I did the foundation year.
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    (Original post by Tyler2709)
    That's good to know, however I'd have to do another 2 years at a level cause they've changed a levels so they're a 2 year course now, not an AS and then an A2 year so that would mean 2 years at a levels then 6 years at uni, or 3 at uni with biology.
    Thanks for the advice, I'm probably gonna end up sticking with biology because it's just such a jump/change and I feel it could go wrong :/
    It would only be 5 years of uni without the foundation year there are two different foundation years at Nottingham, with the same content but different entry requirements. There's prelim year and gateway year (excuse me if these are the wrong way round): gateway is for people from 'disadvantaged' backgrounds, so either people on low household income or people who's schoo/college was in or nearly in special measures from Ofstead. The prelim year is for people with the 'wrong' A levels but unfortunately I don't know if you'd qualify for this because you've done A level biology I think ringing them is a some signle idea.
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    (Original post by Louiseee_)
    It would only be 5 years of uni without the foundation year there are two different foundation years at Nottingham, with the same content but different entry requirements. There's prelim year and gateway year (excuse me if these are the wrong way round): gateway is for people from 'disadvantaged' backgrounds, so either people on low household income or people who's schoo/college was in or nearly in special measures from Ofstead. The prelim year is for people with the 'wrong' A levels but unfortunately I don't know if you'd qualify for this because you've done A level biology I think ringing them is a some signle idea.
    I'll give them a call, if it turns out the only difference between doing vet and not is a gap year next year, I'll do it. Then I can get experience etc
    Thanks, really helped
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    Hi,
    I don't visit this site very often any more but I just came across your post.

    I suggest getting some work experience asap to see if it is for you. I am a vet and have been qualified for 8 years. I left clinical practice several years ago because I found the job far too repetitive. I was using a very small fraction of my skills and knowledge that I had spent so long developing. You unfortunately also meet many frustrations when you can't help every case, and much of the workload is routine and not as varied as is made out.

    I still work as a vet but in an office based environment outside of the UK. I am very lucky to work in such a niche role for a world leading organisation. Although there is an element of repetitive work and administration in what I do, it is very small and not an issue. Every day is genuinely different and I never know what might happen. I have far more variety in this role than I ever had in practice. I get the chance to travel the world, work with with the world's top experts and enjoy an academic stimulating environment still with a clinical slant.

    Many people tend to overlook office based veterinary work but for me it's far superior to working in practice. I'm the envy of all my vet friends and colleagues and I have a much better quality of life - not to mention no on call. So if you like variety keep a close eye out for the repetitive nature of clinical practice, office based work may not be so dull after all!

    Best of luck in your endevours.
 
 
 
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