Laurenafenete
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The official thread for OCR Physics A: The newtonian world

awww yiss its that time of year again

Date: 20/06/2016
Time: 9:00 am
Duration:75 mins

The Frontiers of physics thread can be found here
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3931803

Good luck!
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this.

Why not try posting in a specific subject forum- you might have more luck there.

Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses.

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TheFarmerLad
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Can anyone help me with Jan 2013 Q2b) (ii) ?
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Laurenafenete
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(Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
Can anyone help me with Jan 2013 Q2b) (ii) ?
Yeah what you stuck on? (As in what don't you get with the question)
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motassks
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Quick question about the c) part:


(Earth: radius: 6400km, mass= 6x10^24kg
Moon: radius: 1740km, mass 7.4x10^22, distance from Earth: 3.8x10^8m)

Using the data provided at the start of the homework questions calculate:

a) The Earth's gravitational field strength at the moon

b) The gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the moon

c) The magnitude of the Moons acceleration towards the Earth

Is c) just same answer as a), or is it the answer of for a) and b) added together?
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jackf9283
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Hi

Does anyone know if mass has an effect on any aspect of simple harmonic motion like the frequency, amplitude. etc Thanks for any help
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TheFarmerLad
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(Original post by jackf9283)
Hi

Does anyone know if mass has an effect on any aspect of simple harmonic motion like the frequency, amplitude. etc Thanks for any help
Depends on whether it is a spring or pendulum oscillating
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TheFarmerLad
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Just to clarify, there have been no changes to the syllabus of G484 and G485 right?
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jackf9283
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Ahh right so would the mass have no effect on a pendulum and it would have an effect on a spring?? Thanks for the help btw
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jackf9283
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No change for the A2 this year i think it changes for next year
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SamDavies1998
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(Original post by jackf9283)
Ahh right so would the mass have no effect on a pendulum and it would have an effect on a spring?? Thanks for the help btw
If you're talking about what effect the mass has on the time period (and hence frequency) of a system performing SHM, then yes, you're correct.
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jackf9283
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(Original post by SamDavies1998)
If you're talking about what effect the mass has on the time period (and hence frequency) of a system performing SHM, then yes, you're correct.

Alright thanks
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TheFarmerLad
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Whats the rule on sig figs? Does your answer have to be the same number of sig figs as the values used in the question (almost always 2) or can we leave it as 3? Tend to find I'm losing marks because I'm carrying my exact answer forward in the following questions that involves the value I previously calculated...
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SamDavies1998
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(Original post by TheFarmerLad)
Whats the rule on sig figs? Does your answer have to be the same number of sig figs as the values used in the question (almost always 2) or can we leave it as 3? Tend to find I'm losing marks because I'm carrying my exact answer forward in the following questions that involves the value I previously calculated...
General rule of thumb is to give your final answer to 3sf unless told otherwise. But if you're planning on giving your answer to the second part to 3sf too, then make sure you use your previous answer to at least 4sf. You will not lose marks if, for example, you were asked to show that the velocity of a car was approximately 10ms-1 and then in the second part you had to calculate its KE, and you used the exact answer of 9.976ms-1 instead of 10ms-1. The markscheme will account for both
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Revision King98
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Anyone have access to June 2015 paper and mark scheme?
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Reda2
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So what topics are you finding hard people?

Mine is moles.. Can one of you please just explain moles please. That would be great.
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anita13
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One mole of any substance contains 6.02x10^23 particles (Avogadro's number). It is like saying 1 glass of water contains 250ml water when moles are invovled in calculations, use pV=nRT, where n is number of moles. When u have to convert between normal mass and molar mass, use M=m/n, where M=mass of 1 mole, m=mass of 1 particle, n=number of moles. Hope this helps.
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tobibo
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I'm unsure on the experiment to determine specific heat capacity, I understand the concept of supplying a known amount of energy to a known mass of solid/ liquid and measuring the change in temperature, but I don't know the specifics like what quantities to take repeat measurements of and the circuit diagram. I also know the limits and improvements, it's just those that I struggle with.
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Timon512
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Place all of the apparatus in the thermally insulated container with a lid. Use an electronic mass balance to measure and record the mass of liquid in the beaker. Place thermometer into liquid to measure the initial temperature or you can use a temperature sensor and datalogger. Attach an Ammeter in series and a Voltmeter in parallel to an ELECTRICAL heater. Using an electronic stopwatch, measure the time taken for a given temperature rise. Change in temperature = Tf - Ti. As P=IV, W=IVT and as W=MC^T, C = W/M^T = IVT/M^T.
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tobibo
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(Original post by Timon512)
Place all of the apparatus in the thermally insulated container with a lid. Use an electronic mass balance to measure and record the mass of liquid in the beaker. Place thermometer into liquid to measure the initial temperature or you can use a temperature sensor and datalogger. Attach an Ammeter in series and a Voltmeter in parallel to an ELECTRICAL heater. Using an electronic stopwatch, measure the time taken for a given temperature rise. Change in temperature = Tf - Ti. As P=IV, W=IVT and as W=MC^T, C = W/M^T = IVT/M^T.
Thanks!
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