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    I'm an American who wishes to go to school in Ireland. I would really love to go to Trinity in Dublin, in Classics. I want to eventually pursue a Ph.D, but I'd like to grab my master's first.

    Recently I saw that Trinity offers both an mphil (one year) and an mlitt (two years in Classics. Which one is a) more prestigious and/or b)more conducive to getting a ph.d? Or dphil; I'm not certain if I want to return to the States or not. I really have no idea which one to choose! As for my level of experience in Classics, I am solid in both Latin and in Greek. Three years of the former and six of the latter.
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    (Original post by seabhac27)
    I'm an American who wishes to go to school in Ireland. I would really love to go to Trinity in Dublin, in Classics. I want to eventually pursue a Ph.D, but I'd like to grab my master's first.

    Recently I saw that Trinity offers both an mphil (one year) and an mlitt (two years in Classics. Which one is a) more prestigious and/or b)more conducive to getting a ph.d? Or dphil; I'm not certain if I want to return to the States or not. I really have no idea which one to choose! As for my level of experience in Classics, I am solid in both Latin and in Greek. Three years of the former and six of the latter.
    Just to add to the confusion, Trinity also awards an MA for its standard undergrad degree i.e it would normally be a BA but (similar to Cambridge and Oxford) they "upgrade" it to an MA 3 years after you receive your BA, without any further study.

    http://www.tcd.ie/calendar/1415-2/pa...r-in-arts-m-a/

    Oh, and Dublin isn't in the UK
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    Oh I know, I just didn't think too much about the title I think Cambridge does the same thing? Maybe? I just don't want to hinder my chances of getting into a good Ph.d program
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    (Original post by seabhac27)
    Oh I know, I just didn't think too much about the title I think Cambridge does the same thing? Maybe? I just don't want to hinder my chances of getting into a good Ph.d program
    You might find the folks in Dublin (Ireland) won't be pleased to be relocated to the UK...

    Yes the MA thing applies to Cambridge and Oxford.

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    I can't comment on the MPhil vs MLit for PhD question, sorry. But I've also asked this thread to be moved to the Postgrad forum where it should get a more expert response... (it's currently in the GCSE forum - they are exams for 15/16 year olds)

    BTW, you don't necessarily need a masters to do a PhD. You might be able to jump straight into it if your BA is strong enough.
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    (Original post by seabhac27)
    Recently I saw that Trinity offers both an mphil (one year) and an mlitt (two years in Classics. Which one is a) more prestigious and/or b)more conducive to getting a ph.d? Or dphil; I'm not certain if I want to return to the States or not. I really have no idea which one to choose! As for my level of experience in Classics, I am solid in both Latin and in Greek. Three years of the former and six of the latter.
    You'd probably need a classicist to give you a clearer sense of which if either of those is more prestigious -- if they map onto the distinction between one- and two-year master's degrees in some other humanities disciplines that I know better, the two-year one may be designed for people who need to brush up relevant language skills more substantially before moving to the doctorate and/or are coming in from a related but different discipline.

    You might find contacting the department yourself and asking about the differences between the two options productive. I know several departments that offer one- and two-year master's courses where you can easily transfer to the two-year course during the one-year course, so you could see if that's a possibility at Trinity's classics department.

    Also -- and I apologise if you've done this already -- do due diligence on the fees they charge international students, and on visas. I don't know what Ireland's like but the UK's border control people can be downright obstructionist about international student visas.

    In the humanities in the UK a good master's degree is increasingly becoming a requirement for admission for a PhD. I understand that this is less the case in the US, where the longer doctoral programmes do some of the heavy lifting that master's courses do in the UK. You mention that you're unsure about returning to the States for the doctorate. If you're wondering about a career in academia, look into the implications of doing a British-model PhD (Ireland uses the same model) as an American student: because our PhDs are shorter and more purely research-focused, with less formal professionalisation, US students apparently sometimes struggle (in an already incredibly competitive job market) to find places in US academia after a UK PhD, which limits your employment options. If you're not planning to roll the dice on an academic career, this isn't a consideration.

    And be careful about the distinction between the UK and Ireland. It's kind of a sensitive topic.
 
 
 
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