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    I need some opinions please, I'd much appreciate.

    Are there any legal troubles in accepting multiple graduate scheme offers and rejecting one later? Has anyone been in this situation.. Please let me know.
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    (Original post by Spiritually)
    I need some opinions please, I'd much appreciate.

    Are there any legal troubles in accepting multiple graduate scheme offers and rejecting one later? Has anyone been in this situation.. Please let me know.
    If you've just accepted an offer (especially verbally)they can't force you to show up. However, this really isn't the way things are done, if you accept a job offer and then later back out without a very good reason, you're pretty much burning your bridges with that company forever. If you've got an offer, and you're waiting on another offer you prefer, it's ok to ask for a day or two to think things over and contact the other employer saying you have an offer, but you'd prefer their company if they were interested.

    However, if you've got to the stage of actually signing a contract or contracts, there may be legal issues regarding backing out. You might want to seek advice from an employment lawyer or possibly ACAS regarding this.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)

    However, if you've got to the stage of actually signing a contract or contracts, there may be legal issues regarding backing out. You might want to seek advice from an employment lawyer or possibly ACAS regarding this.
    I'm worried now. Damn. I've actually signed a contract and I want to sign another. Pretty stupid I know but I'm only doing this because the first company I signed for wants a 2:2 and the other wants a 2:1. I'm currently struggling with my work but I think I'll get a 2:1. I only want to sign both because if I don't get 2:1 I can have something else to fall back on but if I had rejected the 2:2 offer.i lose in the end. I guess it's about coming up with a good enough excuse later then.
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    (Original post by Spiritually)
    I'm worried now. Damn. I've actually signed a contract and I want to sign another. Pretty stupid I know but I'm only doing this because the first company I signed for wants a 2:2 and the other wants a 2:1. I'm currently struggling with my work but I think I'll get a 2:1. I only want to sign both because if I don't get 2:1 I can have something else to fall back on but if I had rejected the 2:2 offer.i lose in the end. I guess it's about coming up with a good enough excuse later then.
    Job offers aren't like uni offers, you don't get to have a firm and an insurance if you've already signed a contract.

    If you've signed a contract quite a way in advance, I would start by reading it carefully- there may be some provision made for what happens if you need to break the contract due to an unforeseen change of circumstances.

    Realistically, no company is going to try and force you to work for them if you no longer want to, especially as you could give notice on your first day totally legally- it would be a waste of everyone's time. I'm not an expert, but I believe it might be possible for them to take you to court regarding specific costs (e.g. if they paid a recruiter a fee when they hired you). However, it's likely that the amount of money they'd get from this wouldn't be worthwhile and it won't apply in all circumstances.

    The other issue I can foresee is if there's anything in the contract barring you from leaving to work for a competitor, and the two companies would be considered competitors. If this is the case then it's possible breaking contract with one company would bar you from working with another.

    In some industries, word about you doing this could get around quite quickly and harm your future employment prospects. In others, or if the companies are in two different fields, you'd probably never be able to get a job at the first company, but it wouldn't harm your prospects in general.
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    (Original post by Spiritually)
    I'm worried now. Damn. I've actually signed a contract and I want to sign another. Pretty stupid I know but I'm only doing this because the first company I signed for wants a 2:2 and the other wants a 2:1. I'm currently struggling with my work but I think I'll get a 2:1. I only want to sign both because if I don't get 2:1 I can have something else to fall back on but if I had rejected the 2:2 offer.i lose in the end. I guess it's about coming up with a good enough excuse later then.
    If you've signed a contract, you can hand in your notice.
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    Generally, people are more understanding and reasonable than you give them credit for. Let your first employer know and move on. You're letting them know well in advance (I hope) so I wouldn't worry too much about burning bridges. These things happen.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    Job offers aren't like uni offers, you don't get to have a firm and an insurance if you've already signed a contract.

    If you've signed a contract quite a way in advance, I would start by reading it carefully- there may be some provision made for what happens if you need to break the contract due to an unforeseen change of circumstances.

    Realistically, no company is going to try and force you to work for them if you no longer want to, especially as you could give notice on your first day totally legally- it would be a waste of everyone's time. I'm not an expert, but I believe it might be possible for them to take you to court regarding specific costs (e.g. if they paid a recruiter a fee when they hired you). However, it's likely that the amount of money they'd get from this wouldn't be worthwhile and it won't apply in all circumstances.

    The other issue I can foresee is if there's anything in the contract barring you from leaving to work for a competitor, and the two companies would be considered competitors. If this is the case then it's possible breaking contract with one company would bar you from working with another.

    In some industries, word about you doing this could get around quite quickly and harm your future employment prospects. In others, or if the companies are in two different fields, you'd probably never be able to get a job at the first company, but it wouldn't harm your prospects in general.
    They're in different industries. Thanks a lot for the time you took writing this well detailed response. I don't really care much about words going out and stuff. Just worried about the legal side of things.

    (Original post by Smack)
    If you've signed a contract, you can hand in your notice.
    Thanks. That's my plan but I can't until I get my final year grades.

    (Original post by Sakoha)
    Generally, people are more understanding and reasonable than you give them credit for. Let your first employer know and move on. You're letting them know well in advance (I hope) so I wouldn't worry too much about burning bridges. These things happen.
    Both start end of August. Hopefully I can let them know in June. Not sure if that's a bit too late though.
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    (Original post by Spiritually)
    They're in different industries. Thanks a lot for the time you took writing this well detailed response. I don't really care much about words going out and stuff. Just worried about the legal side of things.
    Any negative repercussions of this are highly likely to be reputational, not legal.*


    *This is advice you're getting from the internet - so take it with a grain of salt! But I will say that in my experience, I have never seen a company (in professional services) go after a graduate for reneging an offer.
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    (Original post by Sakoha)
    Any negative repercussions of this are highly likely to be reputational, not legal.*


    *This is advice you're getting from the internet - so take it with a grain of salt! But I will say that in my experience, I have never seen a company (in professional services) go after a graduate for reneging an offer.
    Thanks a lot for this.
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    Reneged offers are very common and almost to be expected by a recruiter.

    It isn't great and you just can't hope to work there any time soon (e.g. If you were to change your mind), but it's highly unlikely an organisation would seek money/compensation via a legal route from you. The only time they do is if you have been given some kind of financial payment before joining.

    Its estimated that out of 100 graduate employers, last year 1000 graduate jobs remained unfilled due to reneged/turned offers, so it's very common and where the job market is pretty good at the moment, is only getting worse.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Its estimated that out of 100 graduate employers, last year 1000 graduate jobs remained unfilled due to reneged/turned offers, so it's very common and where the job market is pretty good at the moment, is only getting worse.


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    Surely they could just re-advertise the positions that remain open?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Surely they could just re-advertise the positions that remain open?
    Not that simple sometimes. Recruitment processes can take 12+ weeks. If you start the process from scratch you might not have enough time before they need to start. If you're tight on time or haven't got the man power to cover the recruitment process it can be easier just to leave the position unfilled.


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