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    I've decided to study a master's in computer science (a conversion course; my first degree was maths) later this year. I've had offers from Imperial and UCL but I'm undecided which to choose.

    Imperial seems to be the "better" university when you look at the league tables. However the UCL course looks like it has much better industry links - apparently there's opportunities to work with companies which can lead to job offers, which seems quite important. I've heard that Imperial has a much harder course which involves lots more work - I guess that would be expected though.

    As it stands I'm leaning more towards UCL, but I was wondering if anyone had any advice they could give. Is there anything I should be considering that I haven't mentioned?

    Thanks in advance!
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    UCL course seems far more practical in the sense you get to do some consultancy and you build a fair amount of apps.
    IC course seems far more theoretical.


    Don't underestimate the amount of work at the UCL course...
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    Which did you choose, and why? Care to share your experiences ?
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    I've chosen UCL and am very happy with my choice at the moment.

    I chose it as it seemed to offer more practical experience. The interview I had for Imperial also put me off for some reason - it all seemed very formal, which I hate. I got a much better vibe from the UCL open day. To be honest, I'm sure Imperial would've been good too, they're both great universities.

    I'm only three weeks in so it's difficult to give any detailed thoughts at this point, but I'm enjoying it so far. It's moving quickly, but in a good way.

    One thing I wish I'd known - the optional AI module has a really strict requirement of having studied formal logic, which would be unlikely for most. That leaves the course with basically no AI-related modules, which is a massive hole IMO given the direction the industry is moving. Having said that, I'd still have picked this course.

    Happy to answer any questions if you're thinking of applying.
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    (Original post by frakur)
    I've chosen UCL and am very happy with my choice at the moment.

    I chose it as it seemed to offer more practical experience. The interview I had for Imperial also put me off for some reason - it all seemed very formal, which I hate. I got a much better vibe from the UCL open day. To be honest, I'm sure Imperial would've been good too, they're both great universities.

    I'm only three weeks in so it's difficult to give any detailed thoughts at this point, but I'm enjoying it so far. It's moving quickly, but in a good way.

    One thing I wish I'd known - the optional AI module has a really strict requirement of having studied formal logic, which would be unlikely for most. That leaves the course with basically no AI-related modules, which is a massive hole IMO given the direction the industry is moving. Having said that, I'd still have picked this course.

    Happy to answer any questions if you're thinking of applying.
    Thanks for the response frakur. I'm considering applying, but asking questions on the basis I get multiple offers (one can hope) and I'm put in the great but difficult situation of having to choose between brilliant universities.

    How have you found the teaching so far, and what are your initial thoughts about UCL? How has your accommodation worked out?

    To be 100% honest, I'm actually applying for the Machine Learning MSc as that's the specific field I'm interested in. I've been taking a MOOC on it which assumed formal logic as well, but it seems to be something that can be learned in an hour or so, so if you're interested in AI maybe see if you can take the module and pick up on what you need to in your own time?

    On the note of time, what's workload like so far? Contact hours?

    Apologies for all the questions, but you're the first person I've managed to find who's currently on an MSc in CS at one of my choice unis!
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    The Msc ML is far more specialised and probably far more useful than a conversion course,


    https://timetable.ucl.ac.uk/tt/homePage.do

    You can search for the Msc CompSci if you want to have an idea of the number of contact hours.
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    (Original post by Incongruous)
    The Msc ML is far more specialised and probably far more useful than a conversion course,


    https://timetable.ucl.ac.uk/tt/homePage.do

    You can search for the Msc CompSci if you want to have an idea of the number of contact hours.
    Thanks for that! Amazing resource. And yeah I'm not aiming for a complete conversion, I feel I have enough experience for a more advanced option.
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    If you're applying to one of the specialist masters then I'm not sure how similar it would be to the general one. The MSc CS is really condensing the 3yr undergrad degree into a 1 year masters. I think the specialist courses assume you've already covered that content.

    I'm finding the workload very manageable right now, but again, this is three weeks in!

    The requirement for the AI module is very strict. I've been told online courses are not acceptable, you need to have studied propositional & predicate logic at undergrad. I guess this isn't relevant for you if you're not going to be doing the general course!

    I really like UCL so far, everyone is very friendly, the teaching is good quality as you'd expect. I found a flat which is fairly nearby for a reasonable price, so I'm happy with that.
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    Hello frakur, thanks for your info so far.

    I am also thinking of the conversion course in Computing in either UCL or Imperial. I would appreciate if you can give me any application tips.

    For your Imperial application, did you take the GRE? Since they say it is advised that MSc applicants provide one.

    for UCL, did you submit a programme you wrote to show your familiarity with programming basics? If you did, what language did you use? I am bit familiar with Javascript, but UCL recommended python or Java..got me worried a bit.

    ANy other tips would be appreciated. Cheers!!
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    (Original post by onomesotu)
    Hello frakur, thanks for your info so far.

    I am also thinking of the conversion course in Computing in either UCL or Imperial. I would appreciate if you can give me any application tips.

    For your Imperial application, did you take the GRE? Since they say it is advised that MSc applicants provide one.

    for UCL, did you submit a programme you wrote to show your familiarity with programming basics? If you did, what language did you use? I am bit familiar with Javascript, but UCL recommended python or Java..got me worried a bit.

    ANy other tips would be appreciated. Cheers!!
    Use Java. Practise your Java a fair amount if you want to come to UCL.
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    I didn't take a GRE and they didn't seem to mind. Maybe that's a new requirement, I've never heard of it before.

    I didn't submit a program to UCL, as they only wanted that if you didn't have any other experience to speak of. As mentioned above, Java is the language that is taught, so you'll have an advantage if you already know it. Having said that, if you already know any other OO languages like C# or Swift you'll pick up Java easily. JavaScript is quite different despite the similar name.
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    JavaScript is very different, but I like your choice - by far my favourite language after 'battling' with it for the past 10 years haha. Yep GRE is a new requirement. Last year it was recommended, this year it's required for advanced MScs and recommended for the conversion. They want quite low scores though so it should be fine. mid 140s for qualitative, high 150s for quant.
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    IC and UCL were two of the universities I was considering when researching these conversion courses, alongside Bristol, Birmingham, Glasgow and Kent, all of which I applied to/got offers from barring the London ones. I can't remember what put me off from applying to UCL at the time, but it may have been the cost of studying in London. I'll need to look into it again as I'm not planning on starting the course until next year. I've done formal/predicate logic at university some years ago.

    (Original post by Incongruous)
    The Msc ML is far more specialised and probably far more useful than a conversion course,


    https://timetable.ucl.ac.uk/tt/homePage.do

    You can search for the Msc CompSci if you want to have an idea of the number of contact hours.
    Probably won't be more useful for someone who has to do a complete conversion to begin with, though.
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    (Original post by frakur)
    I've decided to study a master's in computer science (a conversion course; my first degree was maths) later this year. I've had offers from Imperial and UCL but I'm undecided which to choose.

    Imperial seems to be the "better" university when you look at the league tables. However the UCL course looks like it has much better industry links - apparently there's opportunities to work with companies which can lead to job offers, which seems quite important. I've heard that Imperial has a much harder course which involves lots more work - I guess that would be expected though.

    As it stands I'm leaning more towards UCL, but I was wondering if anyone had any advice they could give. Is there anything I should be considering that I haven't mentioned?

    Thanks in advance!
    They are both excellent universities and respected for Computer Science. I know many people who have studied computer science at Imperial and they were all introduced to businesses to start their careers. I can't say which is better, but I don't think you will struggle with either TBH.

    Having a good MSc from either, with some decent work experience alongside, will get you interviews with most companies.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    IC and UCL were two of the universities I was considering when researching these conversion courses, alongside Bristol, Birmingham, Glasgow and Kent, all of which I applied to/got offers from barring the London ones. I can't remember what put me off from applying to UCL at the time, but it may have been the cost of studying in London. I'll need to look into it again as I'm not planning on starting the course until next year. I've done formal/predicate logic at university some years ago.



    Probably won't be more useful for someone who has to do a complete conversion to begin with, though.
    Yep, they don't accept people for the ML course who don't meet the experience prerequisite (i.e CS degree or technical + lots of outside experience).
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    (Original post by frakur)
    I didn't take a GRE and they didn't seem to mind. Maybe that's a new requirement, I've never heard of it before.

    I didn't submit a program to UCL, as they only wanted that if you didn't have any other experience to speak of. As mentioned above, Java is the language that is taught, so you'll have an advantage if you already know it. Having said that, if you already know any other OO languages like C# or Swift you'll pick up Java easily. JavaScript is quite different despite the similar name.
    Thank you Frakur. I will work with Java now, I have some good resources from an MOOC. I plan to apply latest January after I have taken the GRE. This will also give me enough time to get familiar with Java so i can make a program which i would present to the UCL admission board as part of my Application.
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    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    JavaScript is very different, but I like your choice - by far my favourite language after 'battling' with it for the past 10 years haha. Yep GRE is a new requirement. Last year it was recommended, this year it's required for advanced MScs and recommended for the conversion. They want quite low scores though so it should be fine. mid 140s for qualitative, high 150s for quant.
    I advice you to aim for higher GRE scores and not rely solely on what they recommend because you never know what kind of competition you face from other applicants.
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    (Original post by onomesotu)
    I advice you to aim for higher GRE scores and not rely solely on what they recommend because you never know what kind of competition you face from other applicants.
    Of course haha.
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    Hey everyone

    I have 158 Quant and 161 Verbal. Would this be sufficient, or should I sign up to re-take the test in January? I really want to submit my application now, but I don't want my GRE scores to hurt my application.

    Cheers
    Mike
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    Easier to just ask the uni.
 
 
 
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