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    Ive just started doing waves in physics I'm stuck on this question from the text book.
    It's a really easy question but I don't understand it.

    A point on a taught string performs 56 cycles of oscillation in 35 seconds. Calculate
    The shortest time for it to go from the maximum displacement to zero displacement.

    I finding it difficult to link frequency, period and cycles. It might be cause I just started to look at it but is there a way to help me understand this easy?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Exotic-L)
    Ive just started doing waves in physics I'm stuck on this question from the text book.
    It's a really easy question but I don't understand it.

    A point on a taught string performs 56 cycles of oscillation in 35 seconds. Calculate
    The shortest time for it to go from the maximum displacement to zero displacement.

    I finding it difficult to link frequency, period and cycles. It might be cause I just started to look at it but is there a way to help me understand this easy?

    Thanks
    well a cycle is a complete round trip journey through every point back to your original starting position...

    e.g. this shows one cycle with time on the x axis and displacement of the y axis
    Name:  cycle.PNG
Views: 32
Size:  4.4 KB

    P is the period - the amount of time it takes to complete one cycle... SI unit is seconds

    the frequency (f) is the number of cycles you complete in an amount of time... SI unit is 1/seconds (also known at Hz)

    the relationship between f and P is

    P=1/f

    e.g if the frequency is 50Hz, the period = 0.02 seconds

    and of course the inverse f=1/P is true

    e.g. if the period is 1/3 second, the frequency is 3Hz
 
 
 
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