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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    The hats are for in the direction. Without the hats is for the position as in for a location.
    I don't see how this makes sense. The hats are for unit vector. Not for in the direction.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I don't see how this makes sense. The hats are for unit vector. Not for in the direction.
    As in the vector in that direction. e.g. 6i^ has a length of 6 in the x direction. As far as I'm aware without the hat is the position of a graph, e.g. 6i on a graph is at 6 on the x direction
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    As in the vector in that direction. e.g. 6i has a length of 6 in the x direction.
    Yeah, I know. I was questioning the use of 6\hat{i} v/s 6i.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Yeah, I know. I was questioning the use of 6\hat{i} v/s 6i.
    Just edited the second part afterwards. With no hat its not a vector but a position. Some questions will give two points with i, j and k and you need to work out the vector between them.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    As in the vector in that direction. e.g. 6i^ has a length of 6 in the x direction.
    this

    and
    As far as I'm aware without the hat is the position of a graph, e.g. 6i on a graph is at 6 on the x direction
    this

    are the exact same things.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    this

    and this

    are the exact same things.
    What I mean with the hat is that its a vector/length in that direction, without the hat its a position and does not create a length along that direction. Between two points the vector would have hats as its a length.

    With my example of without the hats its at a position of 6 in the x direction and would be 6 from the origin if it were a unit vector.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    What I mean with the hat is that its a vector/length in that direction, without the hat its a position and does not create a length along that direction. Between two points the vector would have hats as its a length.
    Draw the position vector 6i. It's an arrow starting from the origin and extends upwards 6 units.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Draw the position vector 6i. It's an arrow starting from the origin and extends upwards 6 units.
    Oh right then, I'll need to read up my vectors then.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Draw the position vector 6i. It's an arrow starting from the origin and extends upwards 6 units.
    With standard orientation of the axes it extends right, not upwards.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    With standard orientation of the axes it extends right, not upwards.
    :facepalm: I was thinking of complex numbers. :rofl:
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    :facepalm: I was thinking of complex numbers. :rofl:
    Another reason I prefer the hat version.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Another reason I prefer the hat version.
    Good point...
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Another reason I prefer the hat version.
    I like hats, but not i,j,k.
    It's all about \hat{e}_1, etc.

    (I'm currently doing some work on suffix notation and using the numbers rather than x,y,z or i,j,k makes things a lot easier later on down the line )
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    I like hats, but not i,j,k.
    It's all about \hat{e}_1, etc.

    (I'm currently doing some work on suffix notation and using the numbers rather than x,y,z or i,j,k makes things a lot easier later on down the line )
    Had some notes using e^i and a few months later I have no clue what I was on about


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    (Original post by drandy76)
    Had some notes using e^i and a few months later I have no clue what I was on about


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    e^i or e_i? Two very different things!
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    e^i or e_i? Two very different things!
    The latter


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    (Original post by drandy76)
    The latter


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    Orthogonal vectors that form a orthonormal basis. :yep: (from what little I know, somebody jump in and correct me! )
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Orthogonal vectors that form a orthonormal basis. :yep: (from what little I know, somebody jump in and correct me! )
    From what I recall they're components? I'll check tomorrow and get back to you but I recall reading about them to show why vector addition works


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    (Original post by drandy76)
    From what I recall they're components? I'll check tomorrow and get back to you but I recall reading about them to show why vector addition works


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    Yeah like e_1 is the same as x. It's just a different way of writing it. (No latex as I'm on my phone, sorry)
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    (Original post by rayquaza17)
    Yeah like e_1 is the same as x. It's just a different way of writing it. (No latex as I'm on my phone, sorry)
    And the I denotes which unit vector it denotes right, so e_3 would be equivalent to k?


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