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Imperial maths or Warwick Maths? watch

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'm talking about Warwick as a whole being a target. Although, more kids from Econ/Maths tend to be inclined towards IB, the uni as a whole is targeted.
    Then in that case, what about the folks from from durham bath etc and Im not doubting you just wanted to know if you have any links to the statistics to what warwick grads do once they leave.
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    (Original post by Inert1a)
    Then in that case, what about the folks from from durham bath etc and Im not doubting you just wanted to know if you have any links to the statistics to what warwick grads do once they leave.
    Durham/Bath are less targeted (i.e. semi-targets) and on the whole, send fewer numbers into FO IB. That's not to say you can't make it, plenty of people do, every year. It's just that gross numbers are lower - hell, one of my friends at Durham has done really well this recruitment season.

    As for stats on what Warwick grads do: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/s...ts/department/
    http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/s...s/public_gems/
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    Hi, I have a question regarding the pure mathematics course at Imperial vs the 'plain' mathematics course at Warwick.

    My interest lies with pure mathematics (I'm not a big fan of some of the applied stuff, especially physics/mechanics modules, although I don't mind stats and prob), so the fact that Imperial has a pure mathematics course on top of a standard mathematics course indicates that Imperial is the way to go for me (Warwick doesn't offer a separate 'Pure Mathematics' course).

    Would you agree? It seems that Warwick offers a lot of flexibility (just looked at the module choices), allowing me to pursue solely pure mathematics in the last two years, but it seems to be quite broadchurch early on (i.e. as 'vector analysis' and 'geometry and motion' are both core modules, meaning I have to do physics-y modules...). Thoughts?
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    (Original post by rebirth61213)
    Hi, I have a question regarding the pure mathematics course at Imperial vs the 'plain' mathematics course at Warwick.

    My interest lies with pure mathematics (I'm not a big fan of some of the applied stuff, especially physics/mechanics modules, although I don't mind stats and prob), so the fact that Imperial has a pure mathematics course on top of a standard mathematics course indicates that Imperial is the way to go for me (Warwick doesn't offer a separate 'Pure Mathematics' course).

    Would you agree? It seems that Warwick offers a lot of flexibility (just looked at the module choices), allowing me to pursue solely pure mathematics in the last two years, but it seems to be quite broadchurch early on (i.e. as 'vector analysis' and 'geometry and motion' are both core modules, meaning I have to do physics-y modules...). Thoughts?
    You will find that what constitutes "pure" and "applied" mathematics changes at university. I am a Warwick student and Geometry and Motion is mechanics-y in parts, as the name would suggest, but otherwise feels more like a souped-up core maths module from A level, with emphasis on algebraic skill, memorisation of a million techniques, working with sketches, and calculus. Certainly the problems are pretty much nothing like mechanics problems at A level (if you did M3, there is the exception of finding centre of mass by integration). I have just finished first year but from what I've heard vector analysis is more of the same. Pure maths on the other hand is purer than before, much more emphasis on proof, and, especially in modules like Analysis, building things up rigorously. I think a lot of people go into uni thinking they love pure maths when really they love what passes for pure at A level, which is really just applied maths. Personally I have actually preferred the pure side but I do enjoy more variety. Furthermore I have heard that Imperial is generally better at applied, and Warwick at pure. Perhaps someone can back me up or shoot me down on this.
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    (Original post by 13 1 20 8 42)
    You will find that what constitutes "pure" and "applied" mathematics changes at university. I am a Warwick student and Geometry and Motion is mechanics-y in parts, as the name would suggest, but otherwise feels more like a souped-up core maths module from A level, with emphasis on algebraic skill, memorisation of a million techniques, working with sketches, and calculus. Certainly the problems are pretty much nothing like mechanics problems at A level (if you did M3, there is the exception of finding centre of mass by integration). I have just finished first year but from what I've heard vector analysis is more of the same. Pure maths on the other hand is purer than before, much more emphasis on proof, and, especially in modules like Analysis, building things up rigorously. I think a lot of people go into uni thinking they love pure maths when really they love what passes for pure at A level, which is really just applied maths. Personally I have actually preferred the pure side but I do enjoy more variety. Furthermore I have heard that Imperial is generally better at applied, and Warwick at pure. Perhaps someone can back me up or shoot me down on this.
    Thanks for your reply; I do understand what proper 'pure' mathematics constitutes (rigorous proof is my favourite aspect of mathematics as it is what makes the subject unique. Such a shame that there is little of it in the A-level syllabus so far (just finished A2 Maths and FP1)) and the huge emphasis on practical mathematics in the C3 and C4 (rote learning differentiation/integration techniques is dull af), so I'm fairly set on the idea of studying proper 'pure' mathematics (in addition, number theory + group theory are branches of mathematics that interest me the most, not sure if you can get much purer than that!)
 
 
 
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