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my vertical jump is 27 inches, so why is my 1RM squat not that great? watch

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    "To be in the 95th percentile for men, meaning better than 94% of the men out there, aged 21-25 (essentially in their prime), you would have to jump 28 inches. "

    "Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Football player: 29-31 inches.

    Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Basketball player: 27-30 inches"

    source:
    http://jumpshigher.com/average-vertical-jump





    explosiveness is mainly genetic (rippetoe said the most you could ever improve your vert jump by through training is 1-2 inches), surely if my vertical jump is around the 90th percentile (im making a crude estimeate of the stats above) i would have good genetics for power training? but my 1RM on squat is only 115KG at 77KG bodyweight after 7 months of squatting
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    Squat isn't really an explosive exercise.


    How much can you clean?
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    (Original post by Feel Tha Bern)
    Squat isn't really an explosive exercise.


    How much can you clean?
    never done a clean in my life


    why are cleans seen as the hallmark of explosiveness, but squats arent?
    they are both done with heavy weights, and they both utilise a huge amount of muscle
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    (Original post by Straighthate)
    "To be in the 95th percentile for men, meaning better than 94% of the men out there, aged 21-25 (essentially in their prime), you would have to jump 28 inches. "

    "Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Football player: 29-31 inches.

    Average Vertical Leap of NCAA Div. 1 Basketball player: 27-30 inches"

    source:
    http://jumpshigher.com/average-vertical-jump





    explosiveness is mainly genetic (rippetoe said the most you could ever improve your vert jump by through training is 1-2 inches), surely if my vertical jump is around the 90th percentile (im making a crude estimeate of the stats above) i would have good genetics for power training? but my 1RM on squat is only 115KG at 77KG bodyweight after 7 months of squatting
    Firsly, the regular barbell back squat isn't really related V jump - different energy systems at work. Also 115KG for a single rep at 77KG is pretty novice, start putting up 2/2.5bw 1RMs before you worry about your lifts. If you are doing Rip's SS get off it, 5x5 is far better and you'll see really good progression.

    If you are naturally "fast off the mark" - Box squats, Banded squats/deadlifts, weighted box jumps, power cleans, snatches and plyometric movements will be far more advantageous to building power - however get that 2/2.5x bw squat & ~3xbw deadlift before you start going into that. Get 4/3/2/1 for reps then get on a program like westside's conjugate.
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    PS Reviewer
    <5x5 goat vs SS
    <Recommends conjugate- a routine for multiple ply lifters
    <wut

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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    <5x5 goat vs SS
    <Recommends conjugate- a routine for multiple ply lifters
    <wut

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I don't know if you didn't read my post properly; but I recommenced 5x5 for a strength base, then to move onto a conjugate program.

    Conjugate programs have shown time and time again to bring superior results to athletes looking for sport/activity specific gains - which is why westside has trained athletes in MMA, Rugby/Am football, oly, powerlifting etc. So in this case OP would tailor the program to lean more on developing explosive power, but regardless you're not gonna make any gains on a intermediate-advanced like westside with sub-par lifts - thus why I suggest a linear progressive overload program like 5x5 to bump em up.
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    My box jump record is 55 inch. Yet my 1 RM squat is only 1.5x body weight
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    (Original post by RME11)
    I don't know if you didn't read my post properly; but I recommenced 5x5 for a strength base, then to move onto a conjugate program.

    Conjugate programs have shown time and time again to bring superior results to athletes looking for sport/activity specific gains - which is why westside has trained athletes in MMA, Rugby/Am football, oly, powerlifting etc. So in this case OP would tailor the program to lean more on developing explosive power, but regardless you're not gonna make any gains on a intermediate-advanced like westside with sub-par lifts - thus why I suggest a linear progressive overload program like 5x5 to bump em up.
    5x5 and 3x5 in all reality - it just doesn't matter which one you do. Maybe a bit more hypertrophy out of 5x5, but really nothing

    Conjugate was built for guys competing in plyed lifting, you cant dispute that. There's plenty of decent intermediate programmes out there, just getting stronger will make you more explosive; without the need for conjugate and it's board presses, pin presses etc
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    5x5 and 3x5 in all reality - it just doesn't matter which one you do. Maybe a bit more hypertrophy out of 5x5, but really nothing

    Conjugate was built for guys competing in plyed lifting, you cant dispute that. There's plenty of decent intermediate programmes out there, just getting stronger will make you more explosive; without the need for conjugate and it's board presses, pin presses etc
    from what mark rippetoe said, explosiveness cannot be improved greatly, it is overwhelmingly genetic

    i used to weigh 120lbs at 6'1, borderline anorexic with NO muscle mass and i was very fast at sprinting, i could beat everyone apart from a select few who had been doing rigorous athletics training and they had around 20lbs of muscle more than me

    but i had absolutely no strength, i couldnt squat 40KG
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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    5x5 and 3x5 in all reality - it just doesn't matter which one you do. Maybe a bit more hypertrophy out of 5x5, but really nothing

    Conjugate was built for guys competing in plyed lifting, you cant dispute that. There's plenty of decent intermediate programmes out there, just getting stronger will make you more explosive; without the need for conjugate and it's board presses, pin presses etc
    I've done 3x5 and 5x5, started with the former and ended up jumping ship onto the latter, personally I believe 5x5 is far better to start on. I've seen people do both and the 5x5er's generally see much more consistent gains - when 3x5 guys begin to stall the 5x5 guys generally go further before the reset is needed. 5x5 also builds fortitude and builds up resistance to fatigue.

    Regardless of the origins of the program, it is still the GOAT programming for athletes - they've trained some of the best athletes in the world and teams rely on Louie's guidance for their S&C programs. Doing goal specific exercises is a far better way to go about achieving your goal than to just train generically and hope that you see gains across the board. That'd be like a footballer who want's to improve his shooting keep turning up to training and not doing any shooting drills at all and hoping just "Doing" training will improve his shooting. Going off on a tangent but in summary if you have a goal in mind, you adjust your training to prioritize it - sticking on the same program that isn't addressing your needs hoping the results will just come isn't the most efficient way of training.
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    "Westside conjugate training" doesn't really mean anything at this point. I mean you could ask 5 people to write you a Westside template and you'd get 5 completely different programs.
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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    "Westside conjugate training" doesn't really mean anything at this point. I mean you could ask 5 people to write you a Westside template and you'd get 5 completely different programs.
    It means taking the accepted WS template, and inserting the exercises that will benefit your training goals the most. In OP's situation, that would be exercises benefial to increasing vertical jump (Box squats, pistol squats, weighted box jumps, speed deadlifts, banded deadlifts etc.)

    :dunce:
 
 
 
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