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    Hello everyone,

    This is an informal guide to studying (M)MORSE at Warwick. I believe that all future MORSE coders want to know how to prepare themselves properly before even entering university so I had the chance to talk to someone who recently graduated from Warwick (MORSE). He was very helpful in answering my questions and told me to share the information with everyone here. This guide might also be helpful for Data Science and MathStats @Warwick.

    I would like to take the chance to thank nahasanarhu . If you have any further questions, you can post them here and when I get the chance, I will contact him again. Also feel free to message him yourself.


    Maths modules

    To begin with, it is hard to make the transition from A level Maths into university maths (analysis, linear algebra etc.) and many international students might have an advantage due to having already studied these subjects. That being said, one could always prepare by working through STEP papers to get into the mathematical thinking and it is a matter of hardwork in the first year.

    The key to success in the maths modules is to work through Maths past papers of which there are loads to find on the Warwick website (student login). Depending on the module, seminars will be held which are attended by 3-15 people (e.g. the correspondent was in a group with two others).

    What’s more, lectures will not make you successful – it solely depends on what you make out of them. The lecturers might not be that good at explaining but at the end of the day, it is the PhD students/professors (who run your seminars) who will truly help you.
    That being said, if you don’t like the Maths modules in thefirst year, you can opt to steer clear of maths modules in year 2-4.

    Recommended book to get into mathematical thinking: How tothink like a mathematician (K. Houston)



    How to survive

    As I’ve already mentioned before, the key to success is to work hard and more importantly: work smartly. Passing exams is just a game and this is what you need to learn how to do well.

    Recommended book if you don’t know what to do with your life: Racing Towards Excellence (by Muzaffar Khan and Jan Sramek)



    Social life and societies

    For MORSE coders, it is highly recommended to join the MORSE society. People there will be able to provide you with loads of helpful revision guides and what’s more, you should get in touch with students in years above and get a mentor. Those people will be able to guide you through everything since they have already gone through that experience.

    Regarding halls, according to my correspondent, Jack Martin was very nice and you could get the full halls experience there. You should enjoy the social life to your maximum. (I myself am going to apply to Cryfield because it’s a lot cheaper and I think I can survive it – any mathmos are free to contact me if they want to join Cryfield as well).

    You should also join the largest career societies because those will quickly help you find an outline of what opportunities you have in terms of getting a job (Warwick Finance Society, Economics Society etc.). The sports facilities are amazing as well and cultural socs are recommended (if you like them). Student Cinema (where I am going to be at) is also a very nice one (you can get in for free if you do the ticket billing f.e.): they have allnighters (trilogies) which cineasts might be into.

    For your CV (curriculum vitae), it would be a big advantage if you were an executive of a society so you could list them as one of your soft skills. The size of the soc doesn’t matter, although it is recommended that you are in the larger socs as well because the most renowned firms are backing them and you could build an internal network within the company without actually ever having worked there.



    About nahasanarhu

    He did the 3 year MORSE course because he didn’t get a 2.1 (upper secondary class) which was a requirement for getting onto the 4 year MMORSE course, mainly because he was unorganised (see maths modules). Also, going on the 3 year course will enable you to have access to a wide variety of modules and avoid maths instead. He did get a 2.1 in the end which was obviously a stressful time but he never gave up. He recommends everyone to dip into things you haven’t had the chance to do before while at uni because you might find something that you would like. With regards to jobs, you should find out what you want to do because if you’re not genuine about who you are, chances are high that HR/interviewers will see through you and therefore fail to land the job. Therefore you should be passionate about what you do.

    As always, thanks to nahasanarhu for answering the questions and feel free to discuss everything here!
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    Best Thread ever, thanks for the info!


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    (Original post by AlexSaxton)
    Best Thread ever, thanks for the info!


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    No problem man, anyone attending the open day next week?
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    Me and my friend from the same school who also got a MMORSE offer are driving down


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