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    Anyone who is good at answering the 3 questions paper in Religious studies edexcel this question is for you... how does one get good marks on this bit of the paper because i always struggle for timing. Also what 3 questions are you guys picking? Hows everyone revising for this bit of the exam?
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    (Original post by arsenalgirl123)
    Anyone who is good at answering the 3 questions paper in Religious studies edexcel this question is for you... how does one get good marks on this bit of the paper because i always struggle for timing. Also what 3 questions are you guys picking? Hows everyone revising for this bit of the exam?
    Do you mean the developments paper (unit 3)? Well, you need to spend 35 minutes on each question and that needs to be stuck to as close as possible. Spend too long on one and you'll have less for the next. Your answers (on normal A4) should be about 2 pages for 18 marks, 1 and a bit for 12 marks, and that is a stretch in 35 minutes, I know. It's about practise, however. I got an A* in my mock but that's only because I get a lot of essay writing practise so I can write fast. You're also better off doing all 3 questions quickly than just 2 of them slowly.

    As for revising, I made revision summaries for each topic I'm going to/could answer (deontology, natural law, meta-ethics, the ontological argument & religious language; I did deontology, meta-ethics and ontological in the mock but hopefully I'll do meta-ethics, religious lang and ontological in the real thing) and then flashcards for the quotes for each topic. I'm now planning and/or writing every past paper question I could get my hands on, because the format of the question doesn't have many variations on developments tbh!
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    Thanks for your response! It's so frustrating because I know all the content it's just always timing that gets me and thats a good idea im going to write model answers for each past question and get teacher to mark it. Other than quotes and reference to books is there any more advise you could give on how to achieve full marks?? Maybe in terms of structure of the 3 questions?
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    (Original post by arsenalgirl123)
    Thanks for your response! It's so frustrating because I know all the content it's just always timing that gets me and thats a good idea im going to write model answers for each past question and get teacher to mark it. Other than quotes and reference to books is there any more advise you could give on how to achieve full marks?? Maybe in terms of structure of the 3 questions?
    Quotes/reference to books are very important BUT make sure you use them in a constructive manner to illustrate and expand a point, rather than to repeat what you're going to say anyway.

    As for structure: 18 marks - start with an intro. for an ethical theory, outline what type of theory it is (eg. normative, deontological). same for philosophy (eg. for ontological argument - a priori, indictive reasoning, reductio ad absurdum). Use the words of the question right from word go - that's what gets you top marks. Make it succinct and make it address the question. Then you need to list the key/important ideas/concepts or the key/important weaknesses/strengths/weaknesses and strengths. Start paragraphs with the words of the questions - it's repetitive but it keeps you on track. Examples: "A further important feature of Kant’s theory is that he believed that we should act only out of duty and obligation"; "The first significant concept of NL is Aquinas’ identification of four types of interrelated law". There's no need for a conclusion and it's a waste of time. Have a look at the examiners' reports to see sample answers!

    12 marks - you should have 3 paragraphs + conclusion. Each paragraph should involve a strength and a weakness being played against each other to answer the question. Do not say strength/weakness unless that's the wording of the question. A lot of the ethics questions are things about whether they remain persuasive in the modern world. Do not list strengths vs weaknesses - evaluate them. Interweave them in the paragraph, and come to mini-conclusions at the end of each paragraph (so that you're consistently arguing). Hold something from the side you'll argue for back for your conclusion as new evidence to support your conclusion!

    I do understand your struggle tho! I always know the content but timing is so hard in this exam, which is why I think that practice is the most important thing (and that's what our teachers have advised too). I think that what gets the highest marks is using the info to directly target the question, so I'd practice that if I were you
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    (Original post by rhensis)
    Quotes/reference to books are very important BUT make sure you use them in a constructive manner to illustrate and expand a point, rather than to repeat what you're going to say anyway.

    As for structure: 18 marks - start with an intro. for an ethical theory, outline what type of theory it is (eg. normative, deontological). same for philosophy (eg. for ontological argument - a priori, indictive reasoning, reductio ad absurdum). Use the words of the question right from word go - that's what gets you top marks. Make it succinct and make it address the question. Then you need to list the key/important ideas/concepts or the key/important weaknesses/strengths/weaknesses and strengths. Start paragraphs with the words of the questions - it's repetitive but it keeps you on track. Examples: "A further important feature of Kant’s theory is that he believed that we should act only out of duty and obligation"; "The first significant concept of NL is Aquinas’ identification of four types of interrelated law". There's no need for a conclusion and it's a waste of time. Have a look at the examiners' reports to see sample answers!

    12 marks - you should have 3 paragraphs + conclusion. Each paragraph should involve a strength and a weakness being played against each other to answer the question. Do not say strength/weakness unless that's the wording of the question. A lot of the ethics questions are things about whether they remain persuasive in the modern world. Do not list strengths vs weaknesses - evaluate them. Interweave them in the paragraph, and come to mini-conclusions at the end of each paragraph (so that you're consistently arguing). Hold something from the side you'll argue for back for your conclusion as new evidence to support your conclusion!

    I do understand your struggle tho! I always know the content but timing is so hard in this exam, which is why I think that practice is the most important thing (and that's what our teachers have advised too). I think that what gets the highest marks is using the info to directly target the question, so I'd practice that if I were you
    Would you agree that its better to stay simplistic in this exam to save time. Bang the point straight out. Also do you have any A* example model answers I could have a look at to get a visual idea for the structure?
    Im going to be doing 3 out of ethical language, deontology , religious language, ontological.
    Also if anyone has any good revision videos, links, books or websites feel free to share!
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    (Original post by arsenalgirl123)
    Would you agree that its better to stay simplistic in this exam to save time. Bang the point straight out. Also do you have any A* example model answers I could have a look at to get a visual idea for the structure?
    Im going to be doing 3 out of ethical language, deontology , religious language, ontological.
    Also if anyone has any good revision videos, links, books or websites feel free to share!
    I actually would definitely agree! I used to overcomplicate things sooo badly... It's a balance between the detail & keeping your phrasing simple. If you can say it in a line then don't let it take up a whole paragraph on its own!

    This is an A* deontology essay (29/30 altho the reason my teacher didn't give me 30/30 is because she said I didn't talk about the postulates of pure practical reason.... Which I clearly did...): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...p=docslist_api - it's a bit longer that I'd write in the exam but I managed to fit all of that into my mock somehow!

    Also this is a good revision source for the basics: http://emilydoesalevelrevision.blogs...d%20Ethics?m=0

    (btw you've definitely picked the best topics to answer they're my fave ones!!)
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    (Original post by rhensis)
    I actually would definitely agree! I used to overcomplicate things sooo badly... It's a balance between the detail & keeping your phrasing simple. If you can say it in a line then don't let it take up a whole paragraph on its own!

    This is an A* deontology essay (29/30 altho the reason my teacher didn't give me 30/30 is because she said I didn't talk about the postulates of pure practical reason.... Which I clearly did...): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...p=docslist_api - it's a bit longer that I'd write in the exam but I managed to fit all of that into my mock somehow!

    Also this is a good revision source for the basics: http://emilydoesalevelrevision.blogs...d%20Ethics?m=0

    (btw you've definitely picked the best topics to answer they're my fave ones!!)
    Thanks!! Do you have any to do with the ontological arguement ?? That would be useful as i need to create a model answer for that soon.

    How about Implications paper... How is everyone Revising ????
 
 
 
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