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    Honestly I do not know a whole lot about cyber security but I just know it is a quickly growing industry. I also know I want a job that I won't have to travel and just come into work in the same building each day.

    The college I am transferring to has two degrees I am first trying to decide on. ALSO, as far as cyber security is concerned, they have a graduate certification program that is CAE/IAE certified that you can take after you finish your computer-related bachelors.
    1. I can either choose between Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Computer Science (CS) before I can do the certification, which do you recommend?
    2. What kind of careers can be expected in the cyber security industry?
    3. How's the career-advancement opportunity? Is this more of a stagnant thing or can you work your way up to managerial positions?
    4. What kind of entry-level options are available? Are there commonly internship opportunities in this field?
    5. How's the pay? Can you work your way up to a six figure salary and beyond?
    Thank you all for your input, it is very appreciated.
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    ectI study Computer information systems (ICT) However I think you should study computer science as it has more to do with the systems in depth whereas computer information systems you don't really learn in depth. Careers well at the moment industry will always want cyber security experts as protecting data etc is becoming more important. I don't really know much about the questions however I was speaking to someone in her final masters degree with cyber security and I asked about her salary and she said she is expected to earn 30k as a beginner but obviously like any job the salary will keep going up with experience.
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    (Original post by Psydrox)
    Honestly I do not know a whole lot about cyber security but I just know it is a quickly growing industry. I also know I want a job that I won't have to travel and just come into work in the same building each day.
    Then you'd be looking at some kind of threat intelligence analyst position. Forget about any kind of consulting if you don't want to travel.

    (Original post by Psydrox)
    The college I am transferring to has two degrees I am first trying to decide on. ALSO, as far as cyber security is concerned, they have a graduate certification program that is CAE/IAE certified that you can take after you finish your computer-related bachelors.I can either choose between Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Computer Science (CS) before I can do the certification, which do you recommend?
    In my opinion, whichever you choose, it doesn't matter. It's any potential personal and work experience plus personal interest which will push you over the edge to get a job.

    (Original post by Psydrox)
    What kind of careers can be expected in the cyber security industry?
    I personally work as technical middle-man between analysts and sales. Lots of networking troubleshooting but also a fair share of interaction with analysts to understand threat incidents which they present to us. If you want the most interesting kind of work I'd recommend working for a company which works in providing/selling cyber security services/intelligence, as opposed to being security operations at normal firms. The work will be more interesting and likely more cutting-edge.

    (Original post by Psydrox)
    How's the career-advancement opportunity? Is this more of a stagnant thing or can you work your way up to managerial positions?
    Same as in any job. Work hard (and know the right people) and you will be rewarded.

    (Original post by Psydrox)
    What kind of entry-level options are available? Are there commonly internship opportunities in this field?
    All the big consulting firms do some kind of cyber security consulting, but it will imply travelling (and I cant see it being technically fulfilling). There are lots of young/startup cyber security firms out there today. That's where I would start looking probably. You will find that a lot of cyber security jobs are advertised for people with 5-10 years of experience. You won't get into any of those positions straight outta uni unless you know someone.

    (Original post by Psydrox)
    How's the pay? Can you work your way up to a six figure salary and beyond?.
    You should be able to start at 30k no problem. Being a rapidly growing industry, I cant see it being impossible to get 100k+ salary. You wont get it within 5 years, but once you get to that level, you will have job security AND that salary for the rest of your life. No one in finance can say that. An individual in my company who worked for GCHQ for 10 years told me recently that I will very likely not have to look for a job again in my life, should I choose to stay in this industry.
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    Do NOT study comp sci its a useless degree that is not specific enough you will never be amazing at anything just have mediocre skills in a range of different aspects.

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    Do NOT study comp sci its a useless degree that is not specific enough you will never be amazing at anything just have mediocre skills in a range of different aspects.

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    Sounds like you don't really have a clue, Computer Science is the most versatile degree you could possibly get for this industry...
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    Sounds like you don't really have a clue, Computer Science is the most versatile degree you could possibly get for this industry...
    Exactly my point not specific enough its like going on a DIY course learning about all trades never truly mastering any.

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    Exactly my point not specific enough its like going on a DIY course learning about all trades never truly mastering any.

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    There are plenty of job choices available to those with a computer science degree. Don't just think that you're guaranteed a job just because you completed a degree. The diploma just allows you through the front door to take part in an interview. After that, its all about your personality, personal experiences, interests and achievements; preferably related to the job in question.

    Just because you got a call centre job after your degree doesnt mean everyone else will.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    There are plenty of job choices available to those with a computer science degree. Don't just think that you're guaranteed a job just because you completed a degree. The diploma just allows you through the front door to take part in an interview. After that, its all about your personality, personal experiences, interests and achievements; preferably related to the job in question.

    Just because you got a call centre job after your degree doesnt mean everyone else will.
    CS grads have highest unemployment rate. You are speaking as a student not as a graduate so easy to be nieve.. you'll learn.

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    CS grads have highest unemployment rate. You are speaking as a student not as a graduate so easy to be nieve.. you'll learn.

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    Unfortunately for you, I am speaking as a graduate as of last summer currently working in cyber security.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Unfortunately for you, I am speaking as a graduate as of last summer currently working in cyber security.
    Says you

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    Says you

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    Yes, I do. If you don't want to believe it, that says more about you really.
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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    Says you

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    You sound rather bitter and from a quick perusal at your post history you studied Marketing - so I'm not really sure you're qualified to talk in this area.
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    You sound rather bitter and from a quick perusal at your post history you studied Marketing - so I'm not really sure you're qualified to talk in this area.
    Yet now work in IT.. I suggest you reseach a little harder. you dont need a degree to work in IT

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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Yes, I do. If you don't want to believe it, that says more about you really.
    It says I dont believe random people I meet online and dont personaly know... yes how outrageous.

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    Yet now work in IT.. I suggest you reseach a little harder. you dont need a degree to work in IT

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    OK, I read some more and you've previously said you work on a help desk, so I can understand why you'd think a Computer Science degree wouldn't be specialised enough for you. During my time at university I was never taught how to reset passwords or guide people through setting up their Outlook, instead I was taught software design and development, computer architecture, operating systems, networking, database design, cryptography, security, etc - all of which would be, admittedly, useless for your role...
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    (Original post by Push_More_Button)
    OK, I read some more and you've previously said you work on a help desk, so I can understand why you'd think a Computer Science degree wouldn't be specialised enough for you. During my time at university I was never taught how to reset passwords or guide people through setting up their Outlook, instead I was taught software design and development, computer architecture, operating systems, networking, database design, cryptography, security, etc - all of which would be, admittedly, useless for your role...
    I work with many cs grads who say the course is uselesa why dont you look up the employment ratea for cs grads instead of arguing with me? And its no secret cs is more aimed at programming than anything else.

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    (Original post by Superhotfire)
    I work with many cs grads who say the course is uselesa why dont you look up the employment ratea for cs grads instead of arguing with me? And its no secret cs is more aimed at programming than anything else.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well, yes. You don't really need a compsci degree if all you're gonna do is mundane IT support work. On the other hand, if you are going to be doing more demanding work which involves lengthy troubleshooting, it can be greatly beneficial to have a scientific background from a hard science like maths, physics, chemistry, engineering etc. You don't get this from other degrees. My boss only employs people with hard science degrees (exceptions would only be if you have real work experience from security agencies etc). Most of my colleagues have MSc/MEng or Phd.
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    Do maths instead.
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    Mad Vlad, I believe this is your area of expertise?
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    (Original post by Psydrox)
    Honestly I do not know a whole lot about cyber security but I just know it is a quickly growing industry. I also know I want a job that I won't have to travel and just come into work in the same building each day.

    The college I am transferring to has two degrees I am first trying to decide on. ALSO, as far as cyber security is concerned, they have a graduate certification program that is CAE/IAE certified that you can take after you finish your computer-related bachelors.
    1. I can either choose between Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Computer Science (CS) before I can do the certification, which do you recommend?
    2. What kind of careers can be expected in the cyber security industry?
    3. How's the career-advancement opportunity? Is this more of a stagnant thing or can you work your way up to managerial positions?
    4. What kind of entry-level options are available? Are there commonly internship opportunities in this field?
    5. How's the pay? Can you work your way up to a six figure salary and beyond?
    Thank you all for your input, it is very appreciated.
    1) Neither of those options are going to provide you with a particular advantage. If you have your heart set on one of the other, choose whichever is going to be most interesting to you. (Are you an American student? I had to do some pretty serious googling to find out what CAE/IAE was... that's not really a thing in the UK. If so, I'm not able to best advise on this as the US university education system is quite different to the UK.)

    2) Extremely secure careers (no pun intended). This is not something that is going away any time soon. You can specialise in all sorts of different areas depending on your career goals and interests. Consultancy is a great way to get a breadth of experience quickly, so working for a defence/cyber/Big 4-type firm on contract work, but it sounds like you'd not enjoy the unpredictability (I used to work in the defence sector and the travel was the thing I hated most about the job), If you want to work in a more stable role, government work tends to be pretty stable but you have the downside of invasive security vetting and restrictions on what you can do and where you can go. Other than that, starting out with a commercial organisation whose cyber security team is fairly mature is a great place to learn your tradecraft.

    In terms of things you can do, there's incident response, reverse engineering, penetration testing, policy, compliance, risk management, security architecture and engineering, security devops... a whole load of disciplines really.

    3) Depends on the organisation. The more mature (and large) an organisation, the more rigid the roles will be. For instance, the CIRT I used to work with has got some amazing analysts, but they're all stuck on extremely rigid career progression paths that means that people essentially stagnate or it takes years to jump between arbitrary seniority bands. Meanwhile, when consulting, I moved up the chain pretty quickly as I demonstrated leadership, project management, people management and customer skills far ahead of my pay grade. I'm now 4 years into my career and have a senior (non-management) position in a Fortune 500 company where, again, I'm taking on responsibilities far beyond my pay grade in order to progress. it depends how much you want to progress, really. There are most definitely opportunities for progression; some of the best people in the industry have got to some extremely senior positions at a very young age by demonstrating some outstanding technical competency.

    4) There are, but often with the Big 4-type companies. Anything that involves security clearance is usually a no for internships, as the vetting process is expensive and arduous; it's often just not worth the hassle. So you end up with commercial sector roles that may not appeal to you so much. There are ones out there, but they tend to be competitive and often badly promoted. (The internship we're offering in my team at the moment was abortively promoted, and the job spec was totally unrealistic, despite my comments to HR... :sigh:)

    5) Pay to begin with will tend to be about industry standard for a CS grad, but will typically escalate pretty quickly. I've more than tripled my salary in 4 years. There's a massive skills shortage in this domain at the moment and for the foreseeable future; that demand and very weak supply results in companies fighting to recruit (and retain) the best talent) and they'll often do that with substantial compensation packages and perks. Locales with very high demand, (e.g. SE England/London, DC/Maryland/Virginia, Austin TX, SF Bay area CA) will typically pay significantly more than others. I know some senior to principal level analysts in the bay area earning getting on for $250k.
 
 
 
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