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    what is the limiting factor of glycolysis? I know that answer i just want to know why its the answer. :/
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    NAD(oxidised).
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    (Original post by whydoidothis?)
    NAD(oxidised).
    why nad+?
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    why nad+?
    Glycolysis is an anaerobic process so its not oxygen, you need to continue to reoxidise NAD so glycolysis can continue.

    It could be glucose but i doubt it as many things can be hydrolysed to glucose.

    What is the answer? I think you said in your OP you know.

    Temperature could even become the limiting factor as enzymes are involved vague question.
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    (Original post by whydoidothis?)
    Glycolysis is an anaerobic process so its not oxygen, you need to continue to reoxidise NAD so glycolysis can continue.

    It could be glucose but i doubt it as many things can be hydrolysed to glucose.

    What is the answer? I think you said in your OP you know.

    Temperature could even become the limiting factor as enzymes are involved vague question.
    NAD+ is the answer. (because google told me) i wanted to know why it was the answer.

    i know that glycolysis can happen aerobic and anaerobic.
    and in glycolysis it converts NAD+ to NADH and ADP+Pi to ATP but why is limiting NAD+ going to inhibit production of ATP?
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    (Original post by whydoidothis?)
    Glycolysis is an anaerobic process so its not oxygen, you need to continue to reoxidise NAD so glycolysis can continue.

    It could be glucose but i doubt it as many things can be hydrolysed to glucose.

    What is the answer? I think you said in your OP you know.

    Temperature could even become the limiting factor as enzymes are involved vague question.
    It also depends somewhat on what's considered glycolysis, since anaerobic respiration can take place even when the citric acid cycle isn't running to reoxidise NAD.
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    NAD+ is the answer. (because google told me) i wanted to know why it was the answer.

    i know that glycolysis can happen aerobic and anaerobic.
    and in glycolysis it converts NAD+ to NADH and ADP+Pi to ATP but why is limiting NAD+ going to inhibit production of ATP?
    Limiting NAD+ availability prevents the entire process from happening and stops ATP from being produced. You can't produce ATP without first oxidising the substrate using NAD+.
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    NAD+ is the answer. (because google told me) i wanted to know why it was the answer.

    i know that glycolysis can happen aerobic and anaerobic.
    and in glycolysis it converts NAD+ to NADH and ADP+Pi to ATP but why is limiting NAD+ going to inhibit production of ATP?

    The ATP made during glycolysis is by substrate level phosphorylation.
    This occurs specifically when a dehydrogenase enzyme dehydrogenates a molecules of glucose and NAD has to be reduced. (it accepts the Hydrogen)

    If there is less NAD+ then less hydrogen acceptors so the rate of dehydrogenation of glucose and substrate level phosphorylation goes down. This decreases the rate of glycolysis as it means less dehydrogenation of glucose.
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Limiting NAD+ availability prevents the entire process from happening and stops ATP from being produced. You can't produce ATP without first oxidising the substrate using NAD+.
    so NAD+ is first converted into NADH then ADP +Pi is converted into ATP which is why NAD+ is the limiting factor.

    without NAD+ ATP wlll not happen.
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    (Original post by whydoidothis?)
    The ATP made during glycolysis is by substrate level phosphorylation.
    This occurs specifically when a dehydrogenase enzyme dehydrogenates a molecules of glucose and NAD has to be reduced. (it accepts the Hydrogen)

    If there is less NAD+ then less hydrogen acceptors so the rate of dehydrogenation of glucose and substrate level phosphorylation goes down. This decreases the rate of glycolysis as it means less dehydrogenation of glucose.
    okay thank you! that makes a lot of sense
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    so NAD+ is first converted into NADH then ADP +Pi is converted into ATP which is why NAD+ is the limiting factor.

    without NAD+ ATP wlll not happen.
    No the two events happen simultaneously.
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    okay thank you! that makes a lot of sense
    np glad you get it now
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    (Original post by jessalin)
    so NAD+ is first converted into NADH then ADP +Pi is converted into ATP which is why NAD+ is the limiting factor.

    without NAD+ ATP wlll not happen.
    Roughly speaking, yes, but it's not exactly the fact that one comes before the other that causes the lack of NAD+ to stop ATP production. Almost all of the reactions that occur in glycolysis are in equilibrium, and that means that if one of the reactions can't take place, the products of the reaction before it will build up and eventually prevent the entire pathway from operating.
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    (Original post by whydoidothis?)
    No the two events happen simultaneously.
    They actually don't. =/
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    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    They actually don't. =/
    They probaly don't but thats all you need for a level.
    You sound like you know alot more .
    Thats all I have been taught (doing A2s atm)
    We don't have to talk about equilibrium at all either.
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    I would say that the supply of glucose, availability of NAD and availability of ADP would all be limiting factors
 
 
 
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