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    Meow. :bubbles:
    I have more then 2 questions but can't seem to edit the title .-.

    Sooo I've been confused about how loans and finance works at OU. I was told they only do loans for part time courses, but even full time courses at OU are considered part time right? So would i be able to apply for the 3/4 year OU course and get a loan? Would the loan cover the entire course? (I'm honestly not sure how anything with loans works but meow).

    My second question is pretty much just, is a science qualification at OU worth it? Due to medical issues I ended up dropping out of my sixth form. But would like to try to continue into a science relevant career and this I think is probably my best option, but if I did say, an environmental science course would I be able to go and do a masters or something at another university ?

    And this one isn't really related to OU but if i don't have A levels, but did have an OU undergraduate degree, would I be able to do a post graduate degree?

    Thanks for any help.
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    (Original post by ConsiderScience)
    Meow. :bubbles:
    I have more then 2 questions but can't seem to edit the title .-.

    Sooo I've been confused about how loans and finance works at OU. I was told they only do loans for part time courses, but even full time courses at OU are considered part time right? So would i be able to apply for the 3/4 year OU course and get a loan? Would the loan cover the entire course? (I'm honestly not sure how anything with loans works but meow).

    My second question is pretty much just, is a science qualification at OU worth it? Due to medical issues I ended up dropping out of my sixth form. But would like to try to continue into a science relevant career and this I think is probably my best option, but if I did say, an environmental science course would I be able to go and do a masters or something at another university ?

    And this one isn't really related to OU but if i don't have A levels, but did have an OU undergraduate degree, would I be able to do a post graduate degree?

    Thanks for any help.
    1. You will get funding for your full course duration for the full amount you require, regardless of the pace you study. OU is classed as part time study, but can be studied at a full time rate (120 credits per year). You fill out an application, they do the rest and they send you a paper saying your in debt and how much you owe which you pay back per month when you earn over a certain amount threshold. Its cheaper than a brick university.

    2. All Open University science degrees are entitled "Natural Science" the pathway you pick allows you to put Natural Science: Physics... for example. This is not unique, Cambridge university runs this way and it means very little.

    They are full honours degree, so they are worth it. However... not all the science degrees are accredited. Whether or not you will need accreditation is another story. For example the physics degree is accredited by the Institute of Physics... not all brick universities have that accreditation. Another point to make is not all courses run up and down the UK are accredited science degrees, your best off researching institutes that provide accreditation for the type of science you want to embark on.

    3. You can go onto Masters anywhere. Im in my third year of Physics and going onto a Masters in September at a brick university to do an MSc in an engineering subject. I spoke to maybe 10+ different universities, all were willing to accept my degree from Open Uni for engineering and physics masters. Every single one wanted to see the content of the modules, I guess they don't have many OU applicants. I had the impression going for a masters would be difficult, its quite the opposite... Universities grab as many students as they can £££.

    4. Some of the applications asked for me to list by A-levels and GCSE's but i seriously doubt its a deciding factor and likely just a stat collector. They all wanted confirmation of my current grades in my OU modules, its the results you obtain in your modules and final degree grading that count. When I spoke over the phone and email, A-levels were never mentioned it only appeared sometimes in applications.

    Open Uni takes it incredibly easy in year 1 modules, they start at GCSE and just go beyond A level... It ramps up quickly in level 2 and a steep slope at level 3. Its worth it. One piece of advice if your going for Environmental studies, take the optional MST124 maths module in year 1. It will give you a solid base for the entire of your course. I think it's compulsory with Chemistry and Physics. I have very little negative points to say about my experience with OU and I could write a long list of positive things.

    One thing that may appeal to you - Open Plus - 1.5 years with open uni (depending on rate of study) and then go into second year of a brick university degree.
    http://www.open.ac.uk/choose/openplus/
    The two green tabs down the bottom show the universities in the scheme and what courses are in it.
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    (Original post by Davidswift9)
    1. You will get funding for your full course duration for the full amount you require, regardless of the pace you study. OU is classed as part time study, but can be studied at a full time rate (120 credits per year). You fill out an application, they do the rest and they send you a paper saying your in debt and how much you owe which you pay back per month when you earn over a certain amount threshold. Its cheaper than a brick university.

    2. All Open University science degrees are entitled "Natural Science" the pathway you pick allows you to put Natural Science: Physics... for example. This is not unique, Cambridge university runs this way and it means very little.

    They are full honours degree, so they are worth it. However... not all the science degrees are accredited. Whether or not you will need accreditation is another story. For example the physics degree is accredited by the Institute of Physics... not all brick universities have that accreditation.

    3. You can go onto Masters anywhere. Im in my third year of Physics and going onto a Masters in September at a brick university to do an MSc in an engineering subject. I spoke to maybe 10+ different universities, all were willing to accept my degree from Open Uni for engineering and physics masters. Every single one wanted to see the content of the modules, I guess they don't have many OU applicants. I had the impression going for a masters would be difficult, its quite the opposite... Universities grab as many students as they can £££.

    4. Some of the applications asked for me to list by A-levels and GCSE's but i seriously doubt its a deciding factor and likely just a stat collector. They all wanted confirmation of my current grades in my OU modules, its the results you obtain in your modules and final degree grading that count. When I spoke over the phone and email, A-levels were never mentioned it only appeared sometimes in applications.

    Open Uni takes it incredibly easy in year 1 modules, they start at GCSE and just go beyond A level... It ramps up quickly in level 2 and a steep slope at level 3. Its worth it. One piece of advice if your going for Environmental studies, take the optional MST124 maths module in year 1. It will give you a solid base for the entire of your course. I think it's compulsory with Chemistry and Physics. I have very little negative points to say about my experience with OU and I could write a long list of positive things.
    Thank you so much! This has been so helpful.
    Could you clarify something for me though, you said in part 2 that all OU science degrees are entitled natural science. On their course list, they have natural science, and environmental science. (As well as Environmental studies). I'm hoping to do the environmental science course for the record. But um, I don't really know what you mean, sorry. >.<
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    (Original post by ConsiderScience)
    Thank you so much! This has been so helpful.
    Could you clarify something for me though, you said in part 2 that all OU science degrees are entitled natural science. On their course list, they have natural science, and environmental science. (As well as Environmental studies). I'm hoping to do the environmental science course for the record. But um, I don't really know what you mean, sorry. >.<
    So just glancing at it, Environmental studies is a BA and its modules do not look scientific. Its not the one you will want to do.

    http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q64

    Natural Science has different pathways that your modules follow depending on the choice you want to go into. Everyone in year 1 does the 60 credit module S111 (previously S104) which is basically a crash course in Physics+Biology+Chemistry A-levels rolled into one module (the exam gives optional parts to answer... so you can selectively revise your best topics). The other 60 credits you pick from the list, and MST124 gives you the option to go down the physics or astrophysics route.

    Year 1 is great because you get to experience all aspects of science and you can make a better informed decision on the area you like and want to progress into at year 2.

    Your degree certificate... if you follow all the required modules for Environmental science will be entitled BSc Natural Science: Environmental Science. If you pick the chemistry modules in year 2, it would be BSc Natural Science : Chemistry. That link in this post shows the list of the 'flavours' of science that you can study in level 2 and 3 and put after 'Natural Science' on your degree.

    Have a look at the edit I made on my last post, it links open plus. Something that may interest you if you didn't complete A-levels and still want to go to Uni for the experience.
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    (Original post by Davidswift9)
    So just glancing at it, Environmental studies is a BA and its modules do not look scientific. Its not the one you will want to do.

    http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q64

    Natural Science has different pathways that your modules follow depending on the choice you want to go into. Everyone in year 1 does the 60 credit module S111 (previously S104) which is basically a crash course in Physics+Biology+Chemistry A-levels rolled into one module (the exam gives optional parts to answer... so you can selectively revise your best topics). The other 60 credits you pick from the list, and MST124 gives you the option to go down the physics or astrophysics route.

    Year 1 is great because you get to experience all aspects of science and you can make a better informed decision on the area you like and want to progress into at year 2.

    Your degree certificate... if you follow all the required modules for Environmental science will be entitled BSc Natural Science: Environmental Science. If you pick the chemistry modules in year 2, it would be BSc Natural Science : Chemistry. That link in this post shows the list of the 'flavours' of science that you can study in level 2 and 3 and put after 'Natural Science' on your degree.

    Have a look at the edit I made on my last post, it links open plus. Something that may interest you if you didn't complete A-levels and still want to go to Uni for the experience.
    Ohh thank you so much! ^-^
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    (Original post by Davidswift9)

    3. You can go onto Masters anywhere. Im in my third year of Physics and going onto a Masters in September at a brick university to do an MSc in an engineering subject. I spoke to maybe 10+ different universities, all were willing to accept my degree from Open Uni for engineering and physics masters. Every single one wanted to see the content of the modules, I guess they don't have many OU applicants. I had the impression going for a masters would be difficult, its quite the opposite... Universities grab as many students as they can £££.
    What work did you show them? TMAs? Or did they want to see the textbook content?
 
 
 
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