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    Hi,

    I havent posted here in a long time- so sorry for any typos/mistakes!

    I'm 25 years old, have a degree in History from a reputable russell group uni (York) at a high 2:1 level (68). Back in 2010, I tried, and failed to secure a training contract- i was never really told the reason for this, and after tens of applications and unpaid internships at chambers/local firms, I decided to pursue journalism, taking the hint that perhaps I wasn't fit to be a lawyer.

    I've worked as a journalist for three years - first in TV and then for a national news organisation. I've covered wars, hostile situations (such as the Paris terror attacks), the refugee crisis and also a load of terrorism-related cases, which meant i was in court, a lot. And because of that, the law never really left my mind. I remain fascinated with legal argument, the development of the justice system in relation to current events, and the way that the law affects society.

    I recently resigned from my job after a long period of disillusionment with the field and the way that I saw journalism changing, from meaningful reportage to recycled clickbait as the operation went digital. I realised i didnt want to be an office monkey rewriting wire stories, but that budgets- and the industry itself- may not allow young reporters like myself to continue doing the out-of-office work that I enjoyed.

    Having been unemployed (freelance) for just shy of a month, im now reassessing my options. Pursuing the legal route remains a fascinating and enticing option, but im worried that the same thing will happen to me now, as it did in 2010. Im worried that ill drop 10k for the GDL, and when I apply to firms, they'll look at my CV and consider me not legally minded, or commercially aware enough. Or they'll see me as someone who isnt as business orientated, or too much of a journalist to pursue a different career path.

    I have known people who have gone to magic circle firms with lesser grades and qualifications than myself, and in terms of interesting backgrounds, I think I have a decent story to tell. But I dont want to jump into anything, especially as expensive as this, without knowing what my realistic chances are of becoming a solicitor.

    I am unsure of what law i would want to practice, but ideally I would like to go to a firm on a training contract- so i'd be looking at mid-size to large, probably commercial firms.

    Hope this makes sense.

    Thanks,
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    (Original post by Phantom_X)
    Hi,

    I havent posted here in a long time- so sorry for any typos/mistakes!

    I'm 25 years old, have a degree in History from a reputable russell group uni (York) at a high 2:1 level (68). Back in 2010, I tried, and failed to secure a training contract- i was never really told the reason for this, and after tens of applications and unpaid internships at chambers/local firms, I decided to pursue journalism, taking the hint that perhaps I wasn't fit to be a lawyer.

    I've worked as a journalist for three years - first in TV and then for a national news organisation. I've covered wars, hostile situations (such as the Paris terror attacks), the refugee crisis and also a load of terrorism-related cases, which meant i was in court, a lot. And because of that, the law never really left my mind. I remain fascinated with legal argument, the development of the justice system in relation to current events, and the way that the law affects society.

    I recently resigned from my job after a long period of disillusionment with the field and the way that I saw journalism changing, from meaningful reportage to recycled clickbait as the operation went digital. I realised i didnt want to be an office monkey rewriting wire stories, but that budgets- and the industry itself- may not allow young reporters like myself to continue doing the out-of-office work that I enjoyed.

    Having been unemployed (freelance) for just shy of a month, im now reassessing my options. Pursuing the legal route remains a fascinating and enticing option, but im worried that the same thing will happen to me now, as it did in 2010. Im worried that ill drop 10k for the GDL, and when I apply to firms, they'll look at my CV and consider me not legally minded, or commercially aware enough. Or they'll see me as someone who isnt as business orientated, or too much of a journalist to pursue a different career path.

    I have known people who have gone to magic circle firms with lesser grades and qualifications than myself, and in terms of interesting backgrounds, I think I have a decent story to tell. But I dont want to jump into anything, especially as expensive as this, without knowing what my realistic chances are of becoming a solicitor.

    I am unsure of what law i would want to practice, but ideally I would like to go to a firm on a training contract- so i'd be looking at mid-size to large, probably commercial firms.

    Hope this makes sense.

    Thanks,
    It's never too late - I have recruited trainees in their 30s and 40s.

    If you are inexperienced, you should get experience. Build up your CV with open days, informal work experience etc. Maybe use your journalism contacts to try and find informal placements in legal teams for newspapers/publishers etc.

    Work out what area of law you want to go into. You say mid-size but "probably" commercial - this is very vague. It's not that you need to know exactly what type of lawyer you are going to qualify as, but you do need an indication of why "commercial" and what type of "commercial".

    Only you can define your chances of a TC and that will be driven by your action to build up your CV with evidence to suggest you are interested in "commercial" law.
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    You're obviously not too old, however, you need to weigh up the pros and cons of committing to becoming a Solicitor.

    Firstly, you're currently unemployed (freelance) and therefore I suspect you're not receiving a regular income. How long can you keep this up for? It's very unlikely that you'll be able to secure a TC without having done the GDL and, therefore, can you afford to stump up ~£10k to simply put you in a position whereby firms would consider you for a TC? On top of that, even if you do complete the GDL then you'll have to secure a TC? Will you be lucky enough to secure one before completing the LPC? If so, great. However, the chances are that you won't. If so, do you see yourself in a position to stump up another ~£10k to complete the LPC?
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    It's very unlikely that you'll be able to secure a TC without having done the GDL and, therefore, can you afford to stump up ~£10k to simply put you in a position whereby firms would consider you for a TC?
    I'd disagree what that being "very unlikely". The overwhelming majority of people I recruited had not started, and many more had not completed their GDL, when they secured their TC.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I'd disagree what that being "very unlikely". The overwhelming majority of people I recruited had not started, and many more had not completed their GDL, when they secured their TC.
    I can't disagree with your experience, however, I recall from my class of ~25 on the LPC that only 1 person had secured a TC prior to starting the LPC. I suspect the numbers would be similar, if not lower, for people starting the GDL.

    Also, how would the OP be able to show a commitment to law when they've never studied it? - presuming they're applying for TC prior to starting the GDL.
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    I can't disagree with your experience, however, I recall from my class of ~25 on the LPC that only 1 person had secured a TC prior to starting the LPC. I suspect the numbers would be similar, if not lower, for people starting the GDL.

    Also, how would the OP be able to show a commitment to law when they've never studied it? - presuming they're applying for TC prior to starting the GDL.
    I guess it depends on the LPC class. Think about all those people on bespoke LPC classes that have secured their TCs before starting the courses and their firm's have put them on the courses that fit their requirements.

    There's plenty of ways to show your commitment to law outside of studying it - in fact many argue that studying law shows little to no correlation to commitment to working within the sector. It's why I strongly recommend the OP builds up their work experience - as ultimately the commit they have to show is for the career not for the academic subject.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I guess it depends on the LPC class. Think about all those people on bespoke LPC classes that have secured their TCs before starting the courses and their firm's have put them on the courses that fit their requirements.

    There's plenty of ways to show your commitment to law outside of studying it - in fact many argue that studying law shows little to no correlation to commitment to working within the sector. It's why I strongly recommend the OP builds up their work experience - as ultimately the commit they have to show is for the career not for the academic subject.
    Completely agree with what JSP said.


    OP its never too late. Ibe known people in their 60's become trainees.

    You do have some challenges though and that includes quitting your job as well as being able to show your commitment to law. You might want to do some more work experience and figure out how you will sell your skills.

    Oersonally i would think long and hard before paying for the GDL myself as its much smarter to get a firm to pay for you.
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    25 is not very old. As someone who worked in the media world a lot longer than you did before switching to law I can tell you it's possible.

    What stands out to me is, you didn't pursue law opting for something completely different. Now you want to abandon your media career after three years.

    Three years is no time.

    How will they be convinced you really do want to do law and you will stick at it?

    Address those points, otherwise your former exp will assist if you come at it from the right angle.




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    (Original post by Jasy)
    I can't disagree with your experience, however, I recall from my class of ~25 on the LPC that only 1 person had secured a TC prior to starting the LPC. I suspect the numbers would be similar, if not lower, for people starting the GDL.

    Also, how would the OP be able to show a commitment to law when they've never studied it? - presuming they're applying for TC prior to starting the GDL.
    They tend to organise LPC classes by whether or not you have a TC. The room will tend to either be all non-TC students or all TC students.

    My two cents is that dropping 10k on the GDL before securing a TC is not a smart move, particularly as it is unclear whether what place the GDL will have when the SRA makes its changes to the qualification route.
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    Perhaps consider a lateral move by researching and gaining experience in media law. That way, your previous experience becomes an asset and talking point, not a liability.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    They tend to organise LPC classes by whether or not you have a TC. The room will tend to either be all non-TC students or all TC students.

    My two cents is that dropping 10k on the GDL before securing a TC is not a smart move, particularly as it is unclear whether what place the GDL will have when the SRA makes its changes to the qualification route.
    Oooh a TC appartheid! I find that rather alarming. Is this at all instututions, BPP or the UoL? I find the idea rather offensive.

    Assan thats good advice.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Oooh a TC appartheid! I find that rather alarming. Is this at all instututions, BPP or the UoL? I find the idea rather offensive.

    Assan thats good advice.
    BPP certainly do it; you'd have to ask someone who went to UoL what they do there, but I'd be surprised if they did it differently.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Oooh a TC appartheid! I find that rather alarming. Is this at all instututions, BPP or the UoL? I find the idea rather offensive.

    Assan thats good advice.
    Isn't alarming at all really - it makes sense a lot of the time. 1) they are often doing tailored LPCs that the firms have requested their future trainees sit, often with tailored modules or content; 2) the firms are paying the institutions a significant amount in fees over their contracted period (usually at least 3 years) and so can request things like maximum class sizes; 3) firms often like their future trainees to be in classes together so they get to know people they will be working with in the future.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Isn't alarming at all really - it makes sense a lot of the time. 1) they are often doing tailored LPCs that the firms have requested their future trainees sit, often with tailored modules or content; 2) the firms are paying the institutions a significant amount in fees over their contracted period (usually at least 3 years) and so can request things like maximum class sizes; 3) firms often like their future trainees to be in classes together so they get to know people they will be working with in the future.


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    That would be different though becayse they are doint tailored courses. its more like a sub contract.
 
 
 
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