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    (Original post by etudixnt)
    So is it 90% overall or just 90% in A2? Thank you! I really hope so, I need to aim for the highest I can and I just worry too much
    To get an A* you have to get at least 80% overall in the AS and average at least 90% across all aspects of the A2 i.e. you can get say 87% in the paper if you got like 94% in the oral. That maths probably isn't right- just an example
    sorry know you weren't asking me
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    (Original post by eleanor27)
    To get an A* you have to get at least 80% overall in the AS and average at least 90% across all aspects of the A2 i.e. you can get say 87% in the paper if you got like 94% in the oral. That maths probably isn't right- just an example
    sorry know you weren't asking me

    That makes sense! Thank you so much
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    I'm also doing Edexcel Spanish. I'm alright with writing but I don't know what happens during the oral exam — I just slip and start mumbling, 0 fluency, my mind just goes blank. Even though I speak Spanish okay but not in the exam :/ Any tips?
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    (Original post by etudixnt)
    So is it 90% overall or just 90% in A2? Thank you! I really hope so, I need to aim for the highest I can and I just worry too much
    No worries, good luck! I'm not sure what the coefficients are for AS and A2, sorry.
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    (Original post by pecora)
    I'm also doing Edexcel Spanish. I'm alright with writing but I don't know what happens during the oral exam — I just slip and start mumbling, 0 fluency, my mind just goes blank. Even though I speak Spanish okay but not in the exam :/ Any tips?
    Honestly the most important thing is to keep practicing! With time you will notice that you are improving and eventually everything will come naturally to you. My school has a native speaker who talks to each A level student in nothing but Spanish for an hour each week to help improve their speaking ability. Currently we're working on exam questions. Does your school offer something like this? I have to say it is really beneficial and although it's difficult at first, I feel as though being put under pressure to speak constant Spanish really improves fluency. It makes your brain think quickly and the experience makes you feel more comfortable in an oral exam, since you know what to expect. I feel like this helps improve fluency!

    I also like to use flash cards. For example in preparation for a potential speaking exam about 'El Botellón' you could write out different flash cards about the positives/negatives, why young people do Botellón, the impacts of Botellón, how the authorities can prevent Botellón... Basically just write out TONS of flash cards preparing your for potential questions on each topic so when it comes to the exam, you have organised your thoughts and you know what answer would suit each question you're asked. It makes things so much more structured and you feel more confident on each topic meaning that your answers become more fluent and prepared. Obviously you have to sound natural so don't pre learn your answers by heart, just skim through the flashcards so your exam doesn't seem robotic or forced.

    I also find that listening to Spanish music helps. Some people might find it odd but honestly it's amazing exam preparation. Listening to the lyrics not only improves vocabulary, but it also helps you understand general sentence structure preventing you from becoming confused or stuck during the exam. It almost makes the language come more naturally to you.

    Finally I would recommend asking your school to do a Spanish foreign exchange or organise Spanish pen pals... My school did an exchange with a school in Madrid in year 9 and it was the most unbelievable experience ever! I truly felt immersed in the culture (as weird as it sounds). Sometimes going on holiday to Spain doesn't give you the true feeling of what it's like to be Spanish, you only really get a taste of the touristy side. However after living with a Spanish student for a week I understood so much more about actual Spanish culture and traditions. I saw the daily school life, the home life, food, pastimes... Literally everything was so different to England and it also helped me to develop my language skills. At the home I was forced to speak constant Spanish since the family were only monolingual. At first I found it relatively daunting but I grew to love it and I became so much more confident when speaking. I still talk to my Spanish friends now, after three years and it's so helpful. We often help each other with essays, speak on Skype... I really recommend it! Even having a pen pal could improve fluency because you could talk on Skype and practice language skills, or go over some useful vocab or sentence structures...

    I also recommend Spanish podcasts! There are some free spanish podcasts on the iTunes Store called "Coffee Break"' which talk about topics relevant to the A level. It's really helpful and allows you to understand how to structure an oral exam answer.

    Sorry about the big huge essay. Hope I helped!
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    The best tip I can give you for AS is to immerse yourself as much as you physically can - you need to be watching films (you might find it helpful to look for films with SPANISH subtitles - I know it really helped me with my listening) and TV in spanish (AS LITTLE ENGLISH AS POSSIBLE), put your phone in spanish, consciously look around, and try and say everything you see in spanish, and translate what you don't know (you'll find your vocab will grow massively), and most important; think in spanish. This will help you to develop your fluency and also your confidence in the language.

    If there's anyone doing A2, do you have any tips for writing a killer discursive essay??
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    (Original post by eleanor27)
    To get an A* you have to get at least 80% overall in the AS and average at least 90% across all aspects of the A2 i.e. you can get say 87% in the paper if you got like 94% in the oral. That maths probably isn't right- just an example
    sorry know you weren't asking me
    This is not technically true. You need 80% UMS across the entire A-Level, NOT AS, with an average of 90% UMS across all A2 units. You do not need an A at AS. So you could, in theory, get 100% UMS at A2 and 60% UMS at AS and still get an A* overall. Sorry to be so pedantic!
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    (Original post by etudixnt)
    Honestly the most important thing is to keep practicing! With time you will notice that you are improving and eventually everything will come naturally to you. My school has a native speaker who talks to each A level student in nothing but Spanish for an hour each week to help improve their speaking ability. Currently we're working on exam questions. Does your school offer something like this? I have to say it is really beneficial and although it's difficult at first, I feel as though being put under pressure to speak constant Spanish really improves fluency. It makes your brain think quickly and the experience makes you feel more comfortable in an oral exam, since you know what to expect. I feel like this helps improve fluency!

    I also like to use flash cards. For example in preparation for a potential speaking exam about 'El Botellón' you could write out different flash cards about the positives/negatives, why young people do Botellón, the impacts of Botellón, how the authorities can prevent Botellón... Basically just write out TONS of flash cards preparing your for potential questions on each topic so when it comes to the exam, you have organised your thoughts and you know what answer would suit each question you're asked. It makes things so much more structured and you feel more confident on each topic meaning that your answers become more fluent and prepared. Obviously you have to sound natural so don't pre learn your answers by heart, just skim through the flashcards so your exam doesn't seem robotic or forced.

    I also find that listening to Spanish music helps. Some people might find it odd but honestly it's amazing exam preparation. Listening to the lyrics not only improves vocabulary, but it also helps you understand general sentence structure preventing you from becoming confused or stuck during the exam. It almost makes the language come more naturally to you.

    Finally I would recommend asking your school to do a Spanish foreign exchange or organise Spanish pen pals... My school did an exchange with a school in Madrid in year 9 and it was the most unbelievable experience ever! I truly felt immersed in the culture (as weird as it sounds). Sometimes going on holiday to Spain doesn't give you the true feeling of what it's like to be Spanish, you only really get a taste of the touristy side. However after living with a Spanish student for a week I understood so much more about actual Spanish culture and traditions. I saw the daily school life, the home life, food, pastimes... Literally everything was so different to England and it also helped me to develop my language skills. At the home I was forced to speak constant Spanish since the family were only monolingual. At first I found it relatively daunting but I grew to love it and I became so much more confident when speaking. I still talk to my Spanish friends now, after three years and it's so helpful. We often help each other with essays, speak on Skype... I really recommend it! Even having a pen pal could improve fluency because you could talk on Skype and practice language skills, or go over some useful vocab or sentence structures...

    I also recommend Spanish podcasts! There are some free spanish podcasts on the iTunes Store called "Coffee Break"' which talk about topics relevant to the A level. It's really helpful and allows you to understand how to structure an oral exam answer.

    Sorry about the big huge essay. Hope I helped!
    Wow, thank you so much for your advice! I find it very useful. Now I'm motivated to try flash cards and music, even though I've always skeptical of these things.

    I know a lot of Spanish people and try to talk to them in Spanish whenever I can. The problem is, our best common language is still English and we slowly drift into English after conversing in Spanish for 5 minutes. But ah, I need to force my brain to be more Spanish.

    Muchas gracias a ti, espero que me vaya bien.
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    (Original post by pecora)
    Wow, thank you so much for your advise! I find it very useful. Now I'm motivated to try flash cards and music, even though I've always skeptical of these things.

    I know a lot of Spanish people and try to talk to them in Spanish whenever I can. The problem is, our best common language is still English and we slowly drift into English after conversing in Spanish for 5 minutes. But ah, I need to force my brain to be more Spanish.

    Muchas gracias a ti, espero que me vaya bien.
    Good luck! Hope it all helps! I tend to ramble on a bit

    Yo también espero que te vaya bien, ¡buena suerte!
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    (Original post by pecora)
    I'm also doing Edexcel Spanish. I'm alright with writing but I don't know what happens during the oral exam — I just slip and start mumbling, 0 fluency, my mind just goes blank. Even though I speak Spanish okay but not in the exam :/ Any tips?
    the same thing happens to me! I really need advice because I want to be more fluent, I really want an a in my speaking exam as well as the written
 
 
 
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