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    Hello there,

    I am planning to move to the US after my GCSEs, would that I mean I attain a high school diploma because I completed my GCSEs? Most of mine are currently A's or A*s, I also have two BTEC Qualifications in Business and Sport, would they be worth much?

    And for instance if I get an A here, is it worth 5 (extremely qualified) or 4? and how does their basic grading system compares to ours, as I heard GCSEs are harder.

    Kind Regards!
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    the thing is there's a huge difference between US grade system and ours.
    you would probably have to do tons of research and possibly contact a teacher from the US?
    i had the same thought to transfer to the US but i eventually changed my mind.
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Hello there,

    I am planning to move to the US after my GCSEs, would that I mean I attain a high school diploma because I completed my GCSEs? Most of mine are currently A's or A*s, I also have two BTEC Qualifications in Business and Sport, would they be worth much?

    And for instance if I get an A here, is it worth 5 (extremely qualified) or 4? and how does their basic grading system compares to ours, as I heard GCSEs are harder.

    Kind Regards!
    Well goodluck going to USA... and yes, it is. The high school diploma is 4 years long, unlike GCSE. Then in USA college is equal to A-Levels. I found this out myself about a year ago.
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    (Original post by ckfeister)
    Well goodluck going to USA... and yes, it is. The high school diploma is 4 years long, unlike GCSE. Then in USA college is equal to A-Levels. I found this out myself about a year ago.
    Wha..? In USA, a college degree is usually 4 years for a Bachelor's, unlike 3 years here. But both are university level. Undergraduate education in the USA is not a levels :erm:
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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    I still have one question unanswered, if I get an "A" in a subject in the UK, what is it equivalent to in the USA in terms of their grading system.

    Thanks, once again!
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    I still have one question unanswered, if I get an "A" in a subject in the UK, what is it equivalent to in the USA in terms of their grading system.

    Thanks, once again!
    US universities emphasise that there is no "equivalent". They evaluate you based on your own qualifications and there is no real conversion.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    US universities emphasise that there is no "equivalent". They evaluate you based on your own qualifications and there is no real conversion.
    What about high schools? how do they see an A in GCSE to their diploma grade?
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    What about high schools? how do they see an A in GCSE to their diploma grade?
    I don't think there is a direct comparison because then universities would use that too
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    (Original post by Student403)
    I don't think there is a direct comparison because then universities would use that too
    Alright thanks for the heads up!
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Alright thanks for the heads up!
    :borat:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Wha..? In USA, a college degree is usually 4 years for a Bachelor's, unlike 3 years here. But both are university level. Undergraduate education in the USA is not a levels :erm:
    I think he meant College = Sixth Form
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    (Original post by aymanzayedmannan)
    I think he meant College = Sixth Form
    Ah. Just that he said "Then in USA, college is equal to A-levels". If A-levels = UK, I thought he was alluding college to USA
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Ah. Just that he said "Then in USA, college is equal to A-levels". If A-levels = UK, I thought he was alluding college to USA
    If I'm misinterpreting it, he meant an undergraduate degree from an American school = A-levels. That's kinda not correct...
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    (Original post by aymanzayedmannan)
    If I'm misinterpreting it, he meant an undergraduate degree from an American school = A-levels. That's kinda not correct...
    Yeah that's what I thought he was saying. Definitely not!
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Hello there,

    I am planning to move to the US after my GCSEs, would that I mean I attain a high school diploma because I completed my GCSEs? Most of mine are currently A's or A*s, I also have two BTEC Qualifications in Business and Sport, would they be worth much?

    And for instance if I get an A here, is it worth 5 (extremely qualified) or 4? and how does their basic grading system compares to ours, as I heard GCSEs are harder.

    Kind Regards!
    I have a friend who wanted to do high school in the states after doing his IGCSEs. They told him that he'd still need to do 3 years of American high school because he was supposedly behind. The high schools there refused to give him the number of credit points his IGCSEs were actually worth - he'd have to take Algebra I (this is stuff that Year 7s do in the UK) even though he did an FMSQ. This is just one case, though.
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    (Original post by aymanzayedmannan)
    I have a friend who wanted to do high school in the states after doing his IGCSEs. They told him that he'd still need to do 3 years of American high school because he was supposedly behind. The high schools there refused to give him the number of credit points his IGCSEs were actually worth - he'd have to take Algebra I (this is stuff that Year 7s do in the UK) even though he did an FMSQ. This is just one case, though.
    Thank you, I'll contact potential schools (in Chicago) and see if they would accept them.
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Thank you, I'll contact potential schools (in Chicago) and see if they would accept them.
    Chicago :love: If you want any help on places to visit, let me know.. I grew up there :awesome:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Chicago :love: If you want any help on places to visit, let me know.. I grew up there :awesome:
    Will do
 
 
 
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