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as a millenial, life ends at 18 Watch

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    (Original post by lotusbloom)
    Indeed, ownership was last century. I don't personally mind, I'm happy with renting. However, it is ludicrous to suggest that home ownership is a slice of cake for millennials or that simply anyone can own a home and that they banks will now hand out mortgages like sweets.
    No one said it is easy, but it is easier if you are a couple and buy in the right areas, don't expect a decent house in an expensive area of London.
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    (Original post by lotusbloom)
    Indeed, ownership was last century. I don't personally mind, I'm happy with renting. However, it is ludicrous to suggest that home ownership is a slice of cake for millennials or that simply anyone can own a home and that they banks will now hand out mortgages like sweets.
    Haha.

    You could just get a job with a decent salary and be frugal with your money. Or you can piss and moan about how hard your life is and never get anything done.

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    I thought we were all meant to die in 2012?
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    I am 18 and very much alive...

    ...at least I think so
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    This is why I'm going to avoid moving to London/South East at all costs when I graduate. Yes the wages are a bit higher but when you factor in living costs you can have a higher standard of living elsewhere despite being paid less.
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    This is why I'm going to avoid moving to London/South East at all costs when I graduate. Yes the wages are a bit higher but when you factor in living costs you can have a higher standard of living elsewhere despite being paid less.
    It's pretty hard to leave the area when everyone you have ever known lives there :/


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    (Original post by Reue)
    None of that suggests any of your initial post to be correct.

    Anyone earning even minimum wage working full time can afford to buy a house in the UK.
    Anyone working minimum wage can afford to buy a house?!.....yeah in like some village in yorkshire with 10 people

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    (Original post by Death Grips)
    Anyone working minimum wage can afford to buy a house?!.....yeah in like some village in yorkshire with 10 people

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    Is that not a house? :s
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    (Original post by Reue)
    Is that not a house? :s
    You know what you said is misleading.

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    (Original post by Death Grips)
    You know what you said is misleading.
    Not at all. I didn't even say a house needing alot of work either because there are plenty of perfectly habitable properties available in that price range throughout the UK.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    You'll only have yourself to blame.
    Nonsense - the growth of the cost of housing has massively outstripped the growth of local wages (from four times the median wage in the 70s to 12x now iirc - and I specify local to avoid the claptrap of houses in the welsh valleys, which you could afford on a normal wage, but where the local earnings are so low that it's similarly out of reach) and there's a lack of housing to start with due to the sell-off of stock into the hands of private landlords prepared to sit on them and grow fat off the rent. When you've got to spend so much just to stand still with the cost of renting saving up for a deposit on a house without parental help will take well into your late twenties/early thirties, possibly longer.

    At best you can say generation Y have themselves to blame for making up such a small proportion of voters compared to the boomers, but that's grasping at straws.
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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    Nonsense - the growth of the cost of housing has massively outstripped the growth of wages (from four times the median wage in the 70s to 12x now iirc) and there's a lack of housing to start with due to the sell-off of stock into the hands of private landlords prepared to sit on them and grow fat off the rent. When you've got to spend so much just to stand still with the cost of renting saving up for a deposit on a house without parental help will take well into your late twenties/early thirties, possibly longer.

    At best you can say generation Y have themselves to blame for making up such a small proportion of voters compared to the boomers, but that's grasping at straws.
    I have to disagree. The OP was clear; unable to buy a house before 30. The fact is that there are jobs & locations in the UK which would allow you to purchase a house before 30 even on minimum wage.

    If you choose not to take up those opportunities then that is indeed your own choice.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I have to disagree. The OP was clear; unable to buy a house before 30. The fact is that there are jobs & locations in the UK which would allow you to purchase a house before 30 even on minimum wage.

    If you choose not to take up those opportunities then that is indeed your own choice.
    They may exist but they're rarer than hens teeth - there are locations where housing is cheap enough to afford on the median national wage, but they're places like Hull - where local economic depravity means precious few will see themselves bringing in said wage. We're not just talking about London of course, vast swathes of the country are inaccessible beyond renting. It may not fit the everyone for themselves narrative, but generation Y have been failed repeatedly by a succession of governments, as a result of the sell-off of housing stock and the failure to invest in replacement stock; they'll be stuck as generation rent
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    (Original post by uktotalgamer)
    How on earth are you meant to afford moving out by yourself?
    (Original post by Foo.mp3)
    You're not. Now sit down, shut up, study hard, go to uni, run up debts, do a masters, more debts, compete for scanty grad jobs, earn a crust, slowly pay down your student finance debts, whilst incurring fresh ones, dream of your own property, forever living at home, forever alone, dream of doing things that make you feel alive, work for the man instead, finally get to pension age, retire, enjoy a couple of years wondering where the **** your life went, then die. Enjoy
    A classic from uncle Foobert, just to lift y'all spirits in this misanthropic thread
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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    They may exist but they're rarer than hens teeth - there are locations where housing is cheap enough to afford on the median national wage, but they're places like Hull - where local economic depravity means precious few will see themselves bringing in said wage. We're not just talking about London of course, vast swathes of the country are inaccessible beyond renting. It may not fit the everyone for themselves narrative, but generation Y have been failed repeatedly by a succession of governments, as a result of the sell-off of housing stock and the failure to invest in replacement stock; they'll be stuck as generation rent
    Took me 30 seconds on google to find a large employer looking for new full time employees in hull.

    Then another 30 seconds to google the exact location, search for recent sale prices within 1/4 mile radius and find properties selling for ~£80k as discussed on this thread.

    I expect youll try and tell me differently, bit every time a thread like this pops up and we've actually done job searches in the local areas it has shown plenty of avaliable positions and housing.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    Totally agree.

    Why wouldn't you move at 18 to be somewhere you could reasonably set yourself up for life? It's the best time to move; unlikely to have many commitments or ties to an area. I can guarantee that at 21 when you finish university a large chunk of your old hometown friends will not return to the area anyway.
    That requires getting a job with very little experience- so it will be minimum wage. And going straight from living at home in the south to living 10 hours away somewhere I've never been, without a car or any social support- and having to live on minimum wage and make friends with the social life I will have to pay for on that minimum wage will be near impossible. None of my friends are going to uni, so most will stay close to home at least for the next few years.


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    (Original post by Failingstudent98)
    That requires getting a job with very little experience- so it will be minimum wage. And going straight from living at home in the south to living 10 hours away somewhere I've never been, without a car or any social support- and having to live on minimum wage and make friends with the social life I will have to pay for on that minimum wage will be near impossible. None of my friends are going to uni, so most will stay close to home at least for the next few years.
    So you've had a choice and decided to stay at home.. which my point.
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    Whilst Reue's analysis is an exaggeration, there is some truth in a strange situation that is developing.

    I graduated from the Uni of Leeds, and amongst my friends now one group got graduate jobs in London and are now on their first or second promotion and are earning say £45-£60k, the others that stayed in Leeds generally got non-graduate admin type jobs and are say earning £25-27k.

    The difference is it's that second group who have got houses! The first group even on those salaries (apart from a few who had parental help) are basically renting and many still in flatshares in their late 20s and early 30s.

    As they've moved up the salary scale the renting arrangements have changed - some of the couples can rent their own small one bed, and the single professionals have moved out of multi-occupancy student type flats and are more looking at living with 1 or 2 other people (often someone in their late 30s/40s who has managed to get a deposit down for a place but needs to take in a flatsharer to cover the mortgage).

    But still the core issue is they are renting and are finding it quite hard to save significantly for a deposit because London rents cream so much of their income.

    I think it is a reality of modern life - if you are moving down to London for a career, and don't have parental assets and help to call on, the reality is you are likely to be renting in some form for a long time. Saving for a deposit is hard because so much of your salary, even a decent salary, gets sucked away in rent.
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    if you have a job in London you're unlikely to be able to get a house there as the houses are rapidly being converted in to flats. So unless you have half a million spare forget the house. People are sharing rooms with strangers to be able to afford to live there.

    Stuck with this government for years so nothing is going to change except that inequality will increase and if you happen to be unable to work you can live on the streets and beg for food.
 
 
 
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