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Maria Sharapova fails drugs test watch

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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/tennis/35750285

    Main quotes:

    "For the past 10 years I have been taking a medicine called mildronate by my doctor, my family doctor, and a few days ago after I received the letter from the ITF [International Tennis Federation] I found out it also has another name of meldonium, which I did not know.

    "It is very important for you to understand that for 10 years this medicine was not on Wada's [World Anti-Doping Agency] banned list and I had been legally taking that medicine for the past 10 years.

    "But on 1 January the rules had changed and meldonium became a prohibited substance, which I had not known."

    She added: "I received an email on 22 December from Wada about the changes happening to the banned list and you can see prohibited items, and I didn't click on that link."

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    If you read the article then it does look like a completely honest mistake. However with the entire sporting world it seems under intense pressure to eradicate doping, i do wonder how the Tennis authorities will approach this one. Will they see it as an honest mistake or will they clamp down on her regardless, to avoid Tennis looking like another FIFA/IAAF?

    Your thoughts?
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    Rules are rules
    Much as I also believe this looks like a mistake.

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    She seems regretful so I do think she will accept any punishment that comes her way. But I think they should also realise it's most probably an honest mistake and tone it down a notch compared to the abusers with obviously malicious intents
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    She should accept whatever comes her way in terms of fines/penalties etc.
    So long as she will be able to continue performing, she deserves her punishment. Sports people have to be vigilant about these things.
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    Wouldn't be fair if they didn't clamp down. Rules are rules, even if it was a mistake.
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    (Original post by _Morsey_)

    Your thoughts?
    I wonder how widely this was publicised and how long before the ban came in?

    According to Wikpedia, it seems to be regarded as a universal cure-all in eastern Europe.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meldonium

    The suggestion from Sharapova is at best she had nine days warning over Christmas. That isn't really fair when one is dealing with a common medicine rather than something that only dopers one step ahead of the regulators would be using.
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    LOL https://twitter.com/Scienceofsport/s...38080071180289


    She didn't think an email notifying her about an updated list of banned substances was relevant to someone who has been taking a prescription drug for 10 years. There's an easy way to test for this: simply lock her in a room with no contact from the outside world for one hour. If she drops dead then it proves that her coach was indeed reminding her that she needs to breathe in and breathe out and she probably is stupid enough for this excuse to work. If not....
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    According to Wikpedia, it seems to be regarded as a universal cure-all in eastern Europe.
    You could say the same about dianabol.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I wonder how widely this was publicised and how long before the ban came in?

    According to Wikpedia, it seems to be regarded as a universal cure-all in eastern Europe.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meldonium

    The suggestion from Sharapova is at best she had nine days warning over Christmas. That isn't really fair when one is dealing with a common medicine rather than something that only dopers one step ahead of the regulators would be using.
    I would agree with this. Essentially the timeline is as follows;

    December 22nd - Sharapova receives e-mail indicating of changes
    January 1st - Changes come into effect
    January 18th - Australian Open begins

    If she's been relying on a drug for 10 years, which to me would classify as dependency, then surely it would be harsh of the Tennis authorities to expect her to give it all up within the matter of 1 month?
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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    You could say the same about dianabol.
    What condition, apart from being a 7 stone weakling who gets sand kicked in their face, is this prescribed for?
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    I feel like she or her team should've been more aware of the changes in the tennis world so i guess its a lesson for her to learn this time to always stay on top of her game and know whats going on around her, instead of just training and playing
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    I'm pretty sure her story holds out, particularly if she has evidence of taking the substance for 10 years. Nonetheless it's the job of professional sportspeople to remain up to date with any changes made by the doping authorities. A short ban should suffice.

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    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    You could say the same about dianabol.
    Dianabol (Metandienone) was on the WADA prohibited list though, whereas in this case, Mildronate (Meldonium) which is what she has been using, was not, and thus according to WADA, has been totally legal during this time (up until January 1).
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    (Original post by _Morsey_)
    I would agree with this. Essentially the timeline is as follows;

    December 22nd - Sharapova receives e-mail indicating of changes
    January 1st - Changes come into effect
    January 18th - Australian Open begins

    If she's been relying on a drug for 10 years, which to me would classify as dependency, then surely it would be harsh of the Tennis authorities to expect her to give it all up within the matter of 1 month?
    She had a month to apply for a theraputic use exemption or pull out of the tournament. Instead she decided that an email about a list of banned substance probably didn't apply to her even though she was taking prescription drugs.

    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    What condition, apart from being a 7 stone weakling who gets sand kicked in their face, is this prescribed for?
    It was a joke.
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    Given this drug is widely available in Russia I suspect the drug has clearly been put on the banned list after Russia's athletics scandal.

    Poor from her really given her personality. She's always come across as someone who is very astute in her tennis career and her career away from the court so I'm surprised that she's allowed it to happen.
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    I'm not buying her story. It can't be a coincidence that the drug she takes for her medical condition also has some performance enhancing abilities.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    I'm not buying her story. It can't be a coincidence that the drug she takes for her medical condition also has some performance enhancing abilities.
    Why can't it be a coincidence? The drug appears to be prescribed for everything from heart disease to alcoholism; as a cognitive enhancer, to boost sexual performance and to address a low sperm count.
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    Meldonium is banned in the USA (where she is based) as it's not approved by the FDA. Wouldn't be surprised if she's been taking it to help her performance rather than true medical reasons.

    Can't punish her for using prior to the ban date since it was fair game but IMO they should throw the book at her. I doubt it's all as innocent as she makes out.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Why can't it be a coincidence? The drug appears to be prescribed for everything from heart disease to alcoholism; as a cognitive enhancer, to boost sexual performance and to address a low sperm count.
    Simply I don't buy her story.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    Simply I don't buy her story.
    Surely it would have been banned years ago not in January. She made a mistake by not checking the list of prohibited items but she was open and honest from the beginning and if the doctor confirms she has a medical condition which requires her to use this then she should be forgiven.
    I think they will give her a one year ban.
 
 
 
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