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More than 25% of Gen Y live with their parents, including 10% of men aged 30-34 Watch

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    (Original post by Howard)
    I don't think TSR is a majority Tory forum.

    But I do agree that the "if you work really hard you can make yourself into something" mantra is well past its best before date. It's about as relevant as the "American dream"

    Might have been true once upon a time but the odds are stacked against people these days. Upward social mobility is at an all time low in the UK and the US.
    I'd have to disagree with this, people think that their lives will be easy as long as they get a degree, governments shovel kids into uni because it keeps unemployment statistics down on the promise that these kids will get a job as soon as they leave and they'll be earning a huge amount and will never have a worry, then when these kids realise that life is harder than they first thought, their fist instinct is to blame something or someone instead of actually putting some work ethic into what they're doing and understanding that life is not an easy ride and you actually have to work for things.
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    (Original post by CAElite)
    Keep in mind your saying this on a majority Tory voting forum. . A lot of people still buy in to the "if you work really hard you can make yourself into something" mantra which is getting more and more difficult.
    In my experience the people that say this were the ones lucky enough to be born in an era when house prices were 3-4 times greater than the average income. You could have a modest job and own a Victorian terrace - it was doable. That doesn't mean a person worked harder, it just means the gap between income and house prices was smaller. That isn't the case today. Even if you attempt save up, the goal posts keep moving and as a result life ends up being on hold for longer.

    Luck is the main reason the "work harder" proponents now own a house. They were lucky just like "Princess" Charlotte was lucky enough to be born into the royal family and as a result will lead a far more lavish lifestyle than any of us on this forum.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    I'm an 18 year old and can save about £6,000 a year, I'm from quite humble beginnings too. You can continue to blame the world for your own failings, like I once did, but sooner or later you grow up. Yes there is a housing crisis, which affects young people more than anyone else, but guess what, young people don't vote, so it's their own fault that the government isn't paying much attention to them.
    Not everybody is able to acquire excellent skills and also have the support of their parents

    You are clearly aware from your previous posts that you are an exception to the rule and then decide to spit out this loving the smell of your own farts faux humble rubbish.
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    What does it mean to be a 'millenial'?

    Millenials are manipulated by central government, they are seen as the resource that will cover the deficit caused by the irresponsible lending. Millenials will spend their whole lives paying off the debts of the rich, whilst simultaneously receiving prejudice for their perceived laziness, political indifference and complacency.

    This generation is blamed as 'irresponsible', whilst assuming complete responsibilty for the frivolity of previous generations.

    I can't blame some young people for staying with their parents, the government is here to reap what it can from them. Milenials are a scapegoat for the economic situation, they are subject to heavier taxes, reduced lending and job shortage, all the while, the public perceive them as having 'brought this upon themselves' through 'idleness'.

    Open your eyes, the public always needs someone to blame.
    Good post
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    My sister does; she's 28, has been with her partner for 7 years, and works at one of the big four lol.
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Not everybody is able to acquire excellent skills and also have the support of their parents

    You are clearly aware from your previous posts that you are an exception to the rule and then decide to spit out this loving the smell of your own farts faux humble rubbish.
    I understand that the government aren't doing enough to support young people. However, I also understand why they aren't, to support young people requires concessions from older people, and simply seeing as young people don't vote and older people do, I fail to see why a government would shoot themselves in the foot like that.

    If young people voted then I can assure you that we'd have free university education, plenty of housing stock, and plenty of other things required to support young people.

    If someone isn't able to better themselves then it's on them as far as I'm concerned and I'm sick to death of the entitlement shown by people from all sections of society, the belief that one deserves to be wealthy and the belief that I owe people something. We are one nation, and we are all in this together, that's not to say that we can afford to be complacent.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    I'd have to disagree with this, people think that their lives will be easy as long as they get a degree, governments shovel kids into uni because it keeps unemployment statistics down on the promise that these kids will get a job as soon as they leave and they'll be earning a huge amount and will never have a worry, then when these kids realise that life is harder than they first thought, their fist instinct is to blame something or someone instead of actually putting some work ethic into what they're doing and understanding that life is not an easy ride and you actually have to work for things.
    You're simply saying that some folks get a degree and expect life to be easier than it actually is. I agree with that. The world doesn't owe anybody a living.

    But my point still stands. It's much harder today to get ahead than in previous generations. And for those born into the poorer sections of society opportunities for upward social mobility are few and far between.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    You're simply saying that some folks get a degree and expect life to be easier than it actually is. I agree with that. The world doesn't owe anybody a living.

    But my point still stands. It's much harder today to get ahead than in previous generations. And for those born into the poorer sections of society opportunities for upward social mobility are few and far between.
    Granted, but if the kids would go out and vote, then things would be different, so they're still a lot to blame.
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    My parents live with me. Nothing wrong with it as I get to take care of them rather than vice-versa.
    Sweetest thing I've read all day :fluffy:
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    (Original post by Carrot_Cake_13)
    Sweetest thing I've read all day :fluffy:
    Thank you .
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    Granted, but if the kids would go out and vote, then things would be different, so they're still a lot to blame.
    Maybe. It's certainly worth noting that Boomers are far more likely to vote than younger X'ers and Millenials. We shouldn't be surprised therefore to find laws that favour the old at the expense of the young.

    Politicians go to work for those that vote for them.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I can't imagine being a 34 man and still living with parents. Milquetoast.
    Or just poor?
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Maybe. It's certainly worth noting that Boomers are far more likely to vote than younger X'ers and Millenials. We shouldn't be surprised therefore to find laws that favour the old at the expense of the young.

    Politicians go to work for those that vote for them.
    Exactly, I said in an earlier post that it would be insane for a government to go out of their way to support a group that doesn't vote for them at the expense of a group that does.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Or just poor?
    No. Sorry. Even if I were poor I'd be out somehow. I just could not imagine being at home with parents at 34. That's not a way for a man to live in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    Thank you .
    It made my day reading it :lol: You sound like the perfect son x'DD

    I really hope I could give back to my parents since they've busted their backs to provide for us. And then there's the kids who don't give a toss about their parents :'o
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    (Original post by Howard)
    No. Sorry. Even if I were poor I'd be out somehow. I just could not imagine being at home with parents at 34. That's not a way for a man to live in my opinion.
    It's profligate. Even one's masculinity has a finite value in the market, and the market is skewed enough that one will sacrifice one's self-respect in order to save up and buy a house.

    It is the only serious choice, and people of this generation cannot afford to be anything other than serious.

    It's also fairly normal, I would say; it is only the past two, maybe three generations, during a period of unprecedentedly fast growth in living standards and unprecedented social mobility, for whom rabid individualism has been the norm.

    Doing what you want is expensive. Serving a narcissism of gender identity is expensive.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    It's profligate. Even one's masculinity has a finite value in the market, and the market is skewed enough that one will sacrifice one's self-respect in order to save up and buy a house.

    It is the only serious choice, and people of this generation cannot afford to be anything other than serious.

    It's also fairly normal, I would say; it is only the past two, maybe three generations, during a period of unprecedentedly fast growth in living standards and unprecedented social mobility, for whom rabid individualism has been the norm.

    Doing what you want is expensive. Serving a narcissism of gender identity is expensive.
    Maybe we are putting too much import on buying a house? It really isn't the be all and end all - not if you have to live in your parent's basement till you're 40 to do so. That's just too much life to give up in exchange for one day "owning" a pile of bricks with a 25 year mortgage on them. That's just me though.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    I'd have to disagree with this, people think that their lives will be easy as long as they get a degree, governments shovel kids into uni because it keeps unemployment statistics down on the promise that these kids will get a job as soon as they leave and they'll be earning a huge amount and will never have a worry, then when these kids realise that life is harder than they first thought, their fist instinct is to blame something or someone instead of actually putting some work ethic into what they're doing and understanding that life is not an easy ride and you actually have to work for things.
    Being able to go to university to gain access to better jobs was a big part of my parents' generations' social mobility. That's what my mum and her brothers did. They went from living in a mining town to accountants and scientists. Saying that that no longer exists is basically agreeing with the guy you are arguing against.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Being able to go to university to gain access to better jobs was a big part of my parents' generations' social mobility. Saying that that no longer exists is basically agreeing with the guy you are arguing against.
    Your parents grew up where there were alternatives to university and those alternatives were made clear. These alternatives now are almost hidden and young people are being funneled through to university because how many university places schools get their pupils into is a key thing that they are judged on, and students keep the unemployment down.

    If young people are naive enough to believe that if they get good grades and a degree they'll have an easy life then it's on them.

    We need to have a tri-partite like system that best utilizes young people, and close a lot of mickey mouse universities offering mickey mouse degrees, but the government won't do that and it's likely that no future one will because a lot of students that shouldn't be in university won't be going to university and it'll make the unemployment figures look worse.

    I'm not offering an excuse for young people, it's up to them to make their own life choices, but expecting an easy life just because they've gone to university is their own issue.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    Granted, but if the kids would go out and vote, then things would be different, so they're still a lot to blame.
    That is part of being in that demographic though. The system perpetuates it. They don;t have the privilege of more "educated" middle class parents or a private school that actually educates them in things liken politics and gives them some kind of awareness of the big picture and where they are in it. They are not guided into any kind of understanding and if they don't do it on their own initiative (which is harder when you get no external encouragement) they are generally more ignorant of things beyond their immediate surroundings and existence.

    Then mix that with the seemingly inability for more privileged people to give a **** and change things fro them... Then again there is a rise in just general anti-politics. Students voted for the lib dems on tuition fees and that was a utter waste of time. People tried to change things and nothing happened. So why bother to engage? Just fall back into your consumerist shell where the only ting you think about what you can buy in the shop.

    Also organisations like unions used to give working class people something latch onto and provide some level of conscience of where they are in society and to improve their lot. That's disappearing as well now. The modern working class is largely made up of insecure min wage totally non skilled work where unions do not exist. People are very atomised and live pay check to pay check.
 
 
 
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