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More than 25% of Gen Y live with their parents, including 10% of men aged 30-34 watch

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    (Original post by Howard)
    Maybe we are putting too much import on buying a house? It really isn't the be all and end all - not if you have to live in your parent's basement till you're 40 to do so. That's just too much life to give up in exchange for one day "owning" a pile of bricks with a 25 year mortgage on them. That's just me though.
    I don't think too much import can be put on it. We have a zero growth, low demand economy across the West because we have everything we need and most of the things we want. Nobody wants any flashy new inventions; it makes it harder for people and businesses to challenge and move up in the economic order.

    Present classes will ossify. Property ownership, even more so than it is already, will become the keenest class barrier - particularly with social liberalism dissolving "social" (as opposed to "economic") classes.

    In this sense staying at home is particularly important to those kids whose parents do not own a home. It is a quiet way of striving, but striving it is. I don't think these people need you to come in and tell them they're unmanly.

    The other way out is emigration I guess.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    That is part of being in that demographic though. The system perpetuates it. They don;t have the privilege of more "educated" middle class parents or a private school that actually educates them in things liken politics and gives them some kind of awareness of the big picture and where they are in it. They are not guided into any kind of understanding and if they don't do it on their own initiative (which is harder when you get no external encouragement) they are generally more ignorant of things beyond their immediate surroundings and existence.

    Then mix that with the seemingly inability for more privileged people to give a **** and change things fro them... Then again there is a rise in just general anti-politics. Students voted for the lib dems on tuition fees and that was a utter waste of time. So why bother to engage?

    Also organisations like unions used to give working class people something latch onto and provide some level of conscience of where they are in society and to improve their lot. That's disappearing as well now. The modern working class is largely made up of insecure min wage totally non skilled work where unions do not exist. People are very atomised and live pay check to pay check.
    And then what happened to the Libdems when they betrayed their voters? This is democracy, you tell people what you're going to do, they vote for it, and then you do it, or you get punished by the voters.

    When I hear the "they're all liars" argument from those who don't vote it frustrates me on a level, I am a young person, and these people not voting affects me. Like, I can't claim housing benefit because of youth disenfranchisement, so when the youth understand that the only way to stop the system ******** on them is by engaging then things will improve for them, and until that happens, they only have themselves to blame.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    And then what happened to the Libdems when they betrayed their voters?
    lol don;t try and sell this as the system working.

    The lib dems big thing was tuition fees. They actually got in to the levers of power in government. Then it flew out the window. The lib dem vote collapsing coincided with the Tories getting a majority, even more ****ed over students now with no maintenance grants and so on. Now what? Corbyn isn't going to win or people don;t want to vote for someone who is as bad the media say he is or the media portrays as being a nutter. If you do like Corbyn's labour he hasn't a hope in hell of winning. There is no avenue to pursue if you are student pissed off with student fees. It's been ingrained now anyway. There is no point even getting angry about it. They lost and you want them to be all engaged with Westminster politics? Why should they? The only choice we evidently have is what to consume with our ever decreasing wages. That's modern democracy.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    lol don;t try and sell this as the system working.

    The lib dems big thing was tuition fees. They actually got in to the levers of power in government. Then it flew out the window. The lib dem vote collapsing coincided with the Tories getting a majority, even more ****ed over students now with no maintenance grants and so on. Now what? Corbyn isn't going to win or people don;t want to vote for someone who is as bad the media say he is or the media portrays as being a nutter. If you do like Corbyn's labour he hasn't a hope in hell of winning. There is no avenue to pursue if you are student pissed off with student fees. It's been ingrained now anyway. There is no point even getting angry about it. They lost and you want them to be all engaged with Westminster politics? Why should they? The only choice we evidently have is what to consume with our ever decreasing wages. That's modern democracy.
    So, great, they don't vote and continue to get **** on, in which case their right to complain disappears.
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    As negative as the last page has been i'd remind you that there are no shortgage of jobs available if your prepared to drop your standards and for a lot of people i'd say that if you were really bright enough to be anything more than a mediocre accountant upon graduating, then you'll still likely be able to succeed in retail or in a production facility.

    May not be pretty (got knows customers not knowing basic things annoys me) but one should remember that careers are simply a means of securing financial security.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    I don't think too much import can be put on it. We have a zero growth, low demand economy across the West because we have everything we need and most of the things we want. Nobody wants any flashy new inventions; it makes it harder for people and businesses to challenge and move up in the economic order.

    Present classes will ossify. Property ownership, even more so than it is already, will become the keenest class barrier - particularly with social liberalism dissolving "social" (as opposed to "economic") classes.

    In this sense staying at home is particularly important to those kids whose parents do not own a home. It is a quiet way of striving, but striving it is. I don't think these people need you to come in and tell them they're unmanly.

    The other way out is emigration I guess.
    I emigrated myself. Twice in fact. Not as easy as you might imagine. And people that won't even try and make it out of mum and dad's nest aren't normally the type of people that are going to emigrate. It takes a fair amount of balls to move to another country. Easy to talk about emigrating to Australia when you're down the pub. Not so easy in real life.
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    (Original post by Lime-man)
    So, great, they don't vote and continue to get **** on, in which case their right to complain disappears.
    There isn't much choice who to vote for, thanks to the first past the post system.

    Since the established generations outnumber students pretty much everywhere, its hard to see how students' interests can be heard at all, even if they did vote.
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    (Original post by RivalPlayer)
    No rent controls, ridiculous house prices and to top it off council homes are becoming increasingly rare. The government don't care. Their answer to solving the housing problem seems to be building more luxury flats for rich foreigners / professionals while continuing to let 300-600k people into the country.

    It's all engineered to make a select few very rich while reducing the overall quality of life for the ordinary citizen.
    Don't know why more people aren't up in arms about it. Another example of our bend-over-and-take-it British tolerance.
    This is a good point. In my 25 years in London I do realise that you often see new high end apartment blocks being built, but rarely apartments for normal, working class people. I guess that's because land in london is expensive, but as you mentioned the government's enthusiam to build new homes for the working/middle class is lacking.

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    (Original post by Death Grips)
    This is a good point. In my 25 years in London I do realise that you often see new high end apartment blocks being built, but rarely apartments for normal, working class people. I guess that's because land in london is expensive, but as you mentioned the government's enthusiam to build new homes for the working/middle class is lacking.

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    Yeah, they are popping up everywhere in my area of London. It seems like any kind of disused space is being turned into luxury apartments. Down the road from me, rent for a 2 bed in one of these new build towers will cost you £3200 pcm on a short lease. Buying the same unit will set you back £450,000+.
    They just aren't aimed at normal people. Instead they're designed for rich, identikit corporate workers who can't afford to live in the "City" and wealthy foreigners looking for a safe deposit box. The government are all too happy to allow foreign buyers to snap up these units up as assets.

    I can't stand them tho - the new apartment blocks/villages look terrible. Parts of my area are starting looking like cold, unfriendly office districts because there's towering glass blocks everywhere. The City of London has started to creep into inner London and its sweeping away the community and humbleness with it. Soon enough the sky will be hardly visible - it'll be just like Hong Kong - we'll be match them on air pollution levels too.
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    I don't think anyone needs to worry about during uni and a bit afterwards, but 30-34 is a bit depressing.
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    Not me I'm still in uni, but my sister still lives with our mum.

    She turns 26 soon and left university quite some years ago now. I don't know whether she would have wanted to move out before now, but she is pretty awful with money and so wouldn't have been able to unless she got her act together financially. Her boyfriend recently bought a house though so she'll be moving in with him soon I think.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    As negative as the last page has been i'd remind you that there are no shortgage of jobs available if your prepared to drop your standards and for a lot of people i'd say that if you were really bright enough to be anything more than a mediocre accountant upon graduating, then you'll still likely be able to succeed in retail or in a production facility.

    May not be pretty (got knows customers not knowing basic things annoys me) but one should remember that careers are simply a means of securing financial security.
    One third of all retail jobs will disappear in the next 9 years.


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    pretty normal for asians to live with their parents, so that must be the 10% lol. They have huge houses though
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    (Original post by paul514)
    One third of all retail jobs will disappear in the next 9 years.


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    cheer up
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    (Original post by paul514)
    One third of all retail jobs will disappear in the next 9 years.

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    A third of retail job vacancies won't be replaced potentially. As somebody working in retail i'm not overly concerned for now though, i'll be in management within 9 years and a third of people won't be getting the sack.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    A third of retail job vacancies won't be replaced potentially. As somebody working in retail i'm not overly concerned for now though, i'll be in management within 9 years and a third of people won't be getting the sack.
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/79172064-d...be0213e07.html


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