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    Thought I'll start a thread for the upcoming German exams.
    Has everyone started revising?
    What are your tips for revising German?
    Alles Gute!
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    I have like started trying to recap all the words but honestly my main revision technique has been crying.

    We have our oral in a few weeks
    im not ready
    for this
    cries

    my tips would be to try and learn so much specific vocab & subjunctive & passive as these are all seem to be things that examiners go crazy over.
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    Edexcelian here but may as well follow
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    (Original post by horsewithnoname)
    Thought I'll start a thread for the upcoming German exams.
    Has everyone started revising?
    What are your tips for revising German?
    Alles Gute!
    Here's my tips:
    • To learn vocab: stick German words with their meanings on bedroom wall. Read through every night and highlight the one's you remember (try using it in a sentence).
    • Change the language on your phone to German, it actually helps a lot!
    • Speak to yourself in German, crazy but it's useful.
    • If you know someone that speaks German tell them to speak to you only in German when they see you
    • Watch German things (I got through a whole season of a German soap opera, it was like friends forgot the name!) :lol:
    • In your spare time write a story in German
    Overall, just find little ways to enjoy learning German.

    Gut Glück!
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    Here's my tips:
    • To learn vocab: stick German words with their meanings on bedroom wall. Read through every night and highlight the one's you remember (try using it in a sentence).
    • Change the language on your phone to German, it actually helps a lot!
    • Speak to yourself in German, crazy but it's useful.
    • If you know someone that speaks German tell them to speak to you only in German when they see you
    • Watch German things (I got through a whole season of a German soap opera, it was like friends forgot the name!) :lol:
    • In your spare time write a story in German
    Overall, just find little ways to enjoy learning German.

    Gut Glück!
    Nice!
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    Hey! I am taking wjec German however I may as well follow. I am currently of a low C grade standard- essay accuracy being my down fall although recently I have received some high scores! Listening I also find hard. I am aiming for an A in the summer for my AS exams in may- I am going to Berlin for 2 weeks during easter to study in a language course on an intense german course- 60 hours including 20 hours of which one to one tuition. Hope it gets me up to an A grade.
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    Here's my tips:
    • To learn vocab: stick German words with their meanings on bedroom wall. Read through every night and highlight the one's you remember (try using it in a sentence).
    • Change the language on your phone to German, it actually helps a lot!
    • Speak to yourself in German, crazy but it's useful.
    • If you know someone that speaks German tell them to speak to you only in German when they see you
    • Watch German things (I got through a whole season of a German soap opera, it was like friends forgot the name!) :lol:
    • In your spare time write a story in German
    Overall, just find little ways to enjoy learning German.

    Gut Glück!
    Vielen Dank!
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    Does anyone understand the the structure of the oral exam? From my understanding, we chose one topic to talk about and we have to chose a card just before the exam and talk about that. Do you then talk about any of the other sub-topics spontaneously? I'm really confused....
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    (Original post by horsewithnoname)
    Does anyone understand the the structure of the oral exam? From my understanding, we chose one topic to talk about and we have to chose a card just before the exam and talk about that. Do you then talk about any of the other sub-topics spontaneously? I'm really confused....
    I'm slightly confused myself still BUT.

    - We choose 1 subtopic from a topic area - e.g. advertising from Media and create 5 questions about that to be asked (but I believe they can ask more/different ones). You will not be asked anymore questions from this topic area (so you won't be asked about tv or communication technology).
    - We are presented with 2 cards and we have to choose one, ex: you get given one on family & relationships with subtopic friendships and another for healthy living with subtopic sport. You will not be asked anymore questions from the topic area (so if you chose sport, you wouldn't be asked uhh whatever the other 2 subtopics in healthy living are).
    - You then get asked questions from the 2 other main topic areas - so Kultur & Family + Relationships.

    i think thts how it works
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    What do you guys think is the best way to revise for essays?
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    (Original post by greentron6)
    What do you guys think is the best way for revise for essays?
    My teachers have given us the summary questions for the topics that we've done so far and we have to prepare answers for them. The essays are often variations on the summary questions, so I would revise your answers to those.
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    For you lot are you having an external examiner assess you, or your teacher? We have our teacher thankfully -prays-.

    I'm now getting so daunted about having to prepare for this speaking exam...there's so much I have forgotten, so little time.
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    Hey I am currently a low C grade standard, do you thing 2 weeks in a Berlin language school will definitely help me to get an A as I am nervous about the trip as its 60 hours of German on my own... DO you think it will help me.
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    (Original post by horsewithnoname)
    My teachers have given us the summary questions for the topics that we've done so far and we have to prepare answers for them. The essays are often variations on the summary questions, so I would revise your answers to those.
    lol seems helpfull, would you be able to share it, by like a picture or something? my school is **** so have to learn german myself, have speaking the 22nd completely going to **** myself.
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    I have a great idea, does anyone want to exchange number so we could text in german?
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    This structure I'm about to explain is for AQA AS Level German.
    Firstly, you will be given a couple of 'cards' with a picture perhaps and some text on it, followed by 5 questions. You will choose one of these and then have 20 minutes in silence, by yourself, to plan your answers. 20 minutes is not a long time so hopefully you can spontaneously speak German to a good standard.
    When this 20 minutes is up you will start your oral exam.
    The examiner will start by asking you the questions on the card that you have prepared. This lasts 5 minutes.
    Next comes your "special topic". You should pre-plan an answer (maybe 4 extended paragraphs) on a topic that you have leart as part of your course specification. It is ideal that you learn this to ensure best marks. This shall last 5 minutes also.
    Lastly, you will have 5 minutes of random questions about topics in your specification that you have not already talked about. Noteably, the cards at the start will be on a different topic to your chosen special topic.
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by horsewithnoname)
    Does anyone understand the the structure of the oral exam? From my understanding, we chose one topic to talk about and we have to chose a card just before the exam and talk about that. Do you then talk about any of the other sub-topics spontaneously? I'm really confused....
    This structure I'm about to explain is for AQA AS Level German.
    Firstly, you will be given a couple of 'cards' with a picture perhaps and some text on it, followed by 5 questions. You will choose one of these and then have 20 minutes in silence, by yourself, to plan your answers. 20 minutes is not a long time so hopefully you can spontaneously speak German to a good standard.
    When this 20 minutes is up you will start your oral exam.
    The examiner will start by asking you the questions on the card that you have prepared. This lasts 5 minutes.
    Next comes your "special topic". You should pre-plan an answer (maybe 4 extended paragraphs) on a topic that you have leart as part of your course specification. It is ideal that you learn this to ensure best marks. This shall last 5 minutes also.
    Lastly, you will have 5 minutes of random questions about topics in your specification that you have not already talked about. Noteably, the cards at the start will be on a different topic to your chosen special topic.
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by limadima)
    I have a great idea, does anyone want to exchange number so we could text in german?
    I'll be willing to message you in German!
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    (Original post by odjack)
    X
    Terrific post thank you!

    Does anyone else feel really nervous in the lead up to any German exam/mock, but then once you're in the middle of it writing away it's kinda like 'hey - this isn't so bad'
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    (Original post by odjack)
    I'm doing A2 but did my AS last year and got an A (35/35 in the essay) so thought I'd chip in... I do French as well and used the same techniques so hopefully this will be helpful for any language!
    • First, I'd say the single-most important thing to work on is vocabulary. If your vocabulary isn't great, your grades in every single component will suffer - you need it to understand the stimulus cards, the reading, listening, cloze exercises and of course the essay. Get on Memrise or Quizlet (I prefer Memrise but it's a personal thing) where you'll find hundreds of related courses that, I am convinced, will improve your grades significantly provided you commit to learning the vocab regularly. These sites make what is otherwise quite a mundane task surprisingly enjoyable, and to this day I look forward to learning new vocab way more than writing an essay!
    • Second is grammar - this was never really a major issue for me because I learnt most of the structures early on and found it pretty simple, but if you haven't nailed them already, be sure to ASAP. Languagesonline is good for practising, as are several of the grammar workbooks (I used the Zeitgeist grammar booklet quite a bit last year and found that very helpful too.)
    • As for the oral - treat it like a chance to show off as many structures and as much advanced vocabulary as possible. The questions are fairly mundane in my opinion ("describe your favourite film" at worst, "why is divorce so common" at best) but that doesn't mean your answers have to be. I saw (and still do!) each question as a challenge to get as many complex structures in as possible. So, for my favourite film, I might say something like "if I hadn't seen this outstanding film, I never would have known so much about the fascinating world of science fiction". In one short sentence I've ticked several boxes - advanced grammar (pluperfect, conditional perfect), interesting vocab and subject-specific vocab - all while making sure I'm still answering the question. Examiners would love that.
    • On that note, make sure you have decided well before the exam what your go-to answer will be for all of the standard questions. For AS, you should know things like your favourite film, band, advertising campaign, internet site, sibling, etc, and be able to explain why. Decide on these answers well in advance so that you don't have any shocks on the day. I used Quizlet to consolidate these things as well as useful sentences and vocab. Learning them made the whole thing far less stressful because I knew I had something to rely on if all else failed. At the same time, never learn your answers word-for-word because the examiner might ask something different from what you are expecting, and regurgitating a script won't impress them in the slightest.
    • Finally, the essay. I was lucky that I had such a good teacher who knew the demands of the essay inside out, but even if you don't, don't worry about the essay, ever. Honestly. If you prepare thoroughly, it will be a breeze. Master the subject-specific vocab for each topic and learn the difficult grammar constructions and you will get them into every single paragraph without realising it and without breaking into a sweat. Getting a high content mark is all about writing clearly, relevantly and logically. That sounds hard, but you can go into the exam knowing exactly how you will structure every single essay, which will make the whole thing a whole lot easier. Start with a clear introduction outlining the issues and what you will discuss (good opportunity for future tense - "In diesem Aufsatz werde ich über ... diskutieren" ) then aim for 6 short-ish paragraphs. If it's a discursive essay (pros/cons) then have 3 points for, 3 points against. ALWAYS answer both parts of the question - if you don't, your content mark really will suffer. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence, throw in a wacky example, then explain why that helps you to make your point. The last bit is the perfect moment for a conditional - examiners seem to like it when you turn the issue on its head (e.g. "If the internet didn't exist, I couldn't look up the lyrics of my favourite song!" or something) because this not only expands on your point but also allows you to show off your advanced grammar. Make sure that for every sub-topic you have 3 for/3 against points in mind BEFORE you go into the exam because this will reduce the time needed to plan (which, ideally, should only be 4-5 mins max with 55 mins left for writing and checking.)
    I hope some of that is helpful! Try and enjoy the exam as much as possible - as bizarre as that sounds, in my opinion they're 10x more fun than a history or geography exam! Any questions, just ask.
    I love you

    This was amazing advice, thanks so much.

    What did you get on your oral last year out of curiosity?
 
 
 
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