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Americans that say "I'm Irish". How come? Watch

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    :facepalm: this thread has become more than retarded.....

    Can an america with irish ancestory claim to be irish? Of course they bloody well can! Okay they have their own local US variation of irish culture but they still have a very familiar lower working class irish culture based around family, pubs etc.

    Hell some of them even retain a thicker Irish accent than many Irish people! It's like claiming an second generation Indian immigrant in the UK is no longer Indian.
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    :facepalm: this thread has become more than retarded.....

    Can an america with irish ancestory claim to be irish? Of course they bloody well can! Okay they have their own local US variation of irish culture but they still have a very familiar lower working class irish culture based around family, pubs etc.

    Hell some of them even retain a thicker Irish accent than many Irish people! It's like claiming an second generation Indian immigrant in the UK is no longer Indian.
    :rofl:

    I said it's like a Nigerian moving to England and having kids and then saying their kids aren't Nigerian :toofunny:

    I was getting worried (for them) you're a breath of fresh air lol
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    (Original post by somesomebody)
    x
    There are words that have discreet definitions, yes.
    There are terms that apply to specific sociological definitions, yes.

    What I'm talking about, though, is the more nebulous applications of these terms where they don't belong.

    It might be semantics, but to me there's a distinct difference between someone saying they're Irish (or whatever) and someone saying they're of Irish (or whatever) descent. To me, the latter gets too often confused - whether deliberately or otherwise - by certain (and usually quite specific) groups for reasons that aren't clear.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    x
    learn now kiddo that when you x out someone's post you're being antagonising and are only asking for the same to be returned to you

    I don't care if you disagree. You have no common sense in this situation and so you want to argue irrelevant things. This isn't a canvas for you to paint your own abstract picture. There's reality, and facts and knowledge. You have none in this situation. You can x my post out all you want, it's still there.

    Anyway scroll up to the first comment on page 3 and realise I'm not the only one saying this, it's quite evident you are taking advantage of your internet anonymity to push forward silly things. :erm:
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    Its about as rational as me saying im White British.
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    I will be blocking you Drewski and anyone else on this thread if I see I'm quoted back just to separate myself from this thread long enough till it's no longer bumped

    I've said what I've had to say:

    being raised in a land different than your ancestors does NOT mean you are not racially or ethnically from this place, and people still continue their culture in different countries after immigrating

    If you desperately want to fit into the white mainstream and neglect your culture just because it was "generations" ago or "just your grandfather" or "I have never been there," then by all means do so but do NOT ascribe your reasons for doing so onto others :confused:

    You can quite simply see that a Pakistani in UK STILL generally lives out their ancestor's culture even though they're not in Pakistan
    Same for Caribbeans, and same for Irish in US

    I'm going for dinner now :erm:
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    I think it's hilarious because before they come to Ireland they get irish dancing lessons and try to learn irish etc but then realise we don't do that on a daily basis and everyone speaks english and we're just like everyone else.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    There are words that have discreet definitions, yes.
    There are terms that apply to specific sociological definitions, yes.

    What I'm talking about, though, is the more nebulous applications of these terms where they don't belong.

    It might be semantics, but to me there's a distinct difference between someone saying they're Irish (or whatever) and someone saying they're of Irish (or whatever) descent. To me, the latter gets too often confused - whether deliberately or otherwise - by certain (and usually quite specific) groups for reasons that aren't clear.
    The thing is culturally, racially and ethnically they are by large Irish by any definition.

    Nationality does not make you a native of that country, part of a countries culture or automatically merge you into that countries ethnic or racial group. Liberals like to claim now in Britain and the US that Nationality does that, but even by a legal definition during the World Wars we've separated Germans and Japanese citizens of the US and Britain. If it wasn't for the second world war (and a lesser extent the first) you'd probably still see German parades in a similar number to Irish ones on the east coast.

    Now say the Irish had come to the US in the numbers they did much earlier it may be different. But when they did emigrate to the US they were often stigmatised a ghettoised much like African Americans, meaning they managed to keep their culture and remained insular much longer than most of the other European groups in the US. The main reason is they in affect replaced the slave labour in the northern/mid states that was no longer commonplace par the two states in the north after the civil war.

    By any social or biological definition Irish-Americans are Irish.
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    (Original post by somesomebody)
    learn now kiddo that when you x out someone's post you're being antagonising and are only asking for the same to be returned to you

    I don't care if you disagree. You have no common sense in this situation and so you want to argue irrelevant things. This isn't a canvas for you to paint your own abstract picture. There's reality, and facts and knowledge. You have none in this situation. You can x my post out all you want, it's still there.

    Anyway scroll up to the first comment on page 3 and realise I'm not the only one saying this, it's quite evident you are taking advantage of your internet anonymity to push forward silly things. :erm:
    You obviously care a little, you bothered to reply...

    I only x'd to try and reset the conversation, devoid of the brewing argument and make my position clear, as I'm aware from reading back that what I'd written was not as clear as it could have been. It was not intended to antagonise.

    My position in the last paragraph of my most recent post is the position I stick by.
    Saying you are 'of' something is too easily confused for its true meaning, to say you are descended from something.

    Using the Irish-American example again, there are some in the US who, yes, have kept that bloodline distinct for generations. They wish to call themselves Irish. Ok.
    But there are a great deal more who have one great-grandparent who was born to Irish immigrants and who have not kept distinct bloodlines but have mixed with immigrants of all nationalities yet still call themselves Irish. Do you not agree that practise is a little odd?
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    It's their ETHNICITY. Their nationality would still be American...
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    I notice Americans love this kind of stuff whenever I'm over there. First time I was in The States I was in California in a hotel bar and this guy was telling our group about how he was Irish. So we asked him where he was from, thinking he was going to say he was born in Cork or Dublin or something. He said his great great grand dad was from County Donegal.

    Outwardly I was like "ah cool, man." but inside I was like "*****, Michael Jordan is more Irish than you"
 
 
 
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