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Quitting the course after one year to join medicine. Procedures????? Watch

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    I'm thinking of applying (again) for medicine for entry in 2017. I emailed a few unis asking if I could join a biomed course in the next academic year in the meantime, and if I get a place, I join them.

    They said sure ok, but you have to sort out the "process" with your chosen uni.

    What does this mean? Do I have to tell the biomed uni anything or can I just go at the end of the year and be like, I'm leaving??

    EDIT: For clarification, I'm still in year 13.
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    I'm thinking of applying (again) for medicine for entry in 2017. I emailed a few unis asking if I could join a biomed course in the next academic year in the meantime, and if I get a place, I join them.

    They said sure ok, but you have to sort out the "process" with your chosen uni.

    What does this mean? Do I have to tell the biomed uni anything or can I just go at the end of the year and be like, I'm leaving??
    I don't think the med unis would be willing for you to do one year studying a Biomed course and then leave.

    By process I guess they are referring to sorting out leaving the uni after studying for one year.
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    I'm thinking of applying (again) for medicine for entry in 2017. I emailed a few unis asking if I could join a biomed course in the next academic year in the meantime, and if I get a place, I join them.

    They said sure ok, but you have to sort out the "process" with your chosen uni.

    What does this mean? Do I have to tell the biomed uni anything or can I just go at the end of the year and be like, I'm leaving??
    I think it'd be a good idea to contact universities which you think you might apply to. Some of them might like to see your UCAS reference (or at least some sort of approval from academic staff) come from the university which you'd be studying Year 1 Biomedical Sciences at. This is because some universities don't want to be seen 'poaching' another university's students.

    It's more dignified to let your academic tutor know once you start Biomed that you'll be applying for medicine. Furthermore, you'd have to declare that you're studying an undergraduate course (Year 1) on your UCAS form, and a lot of medical schools won't like that. It doesn't really demonstrate any kind of commitment.

    Take a gap year and just reapply for medicine - that'd be my advice.
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    I don't think the med unis would be willing for you to do one year studying a Biomed course and then leave.

    By process I guess they are referring to sorting out leaving the uni after studying for one year.
    No no, I emailed some and said they would let me join if I make a successful application, but it would the from the beginning as in 5 years and all that. I wouldn't be considered as a graduate applicant I guess. More on the lines of a "gap year student but not really".

    But my question was, can you just leave, or do you have to tell the uni when accepting the offer, I might leave at the end of next year if I get accepted somewhere else?

    Oh and thanks for the reply
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    No no, I emailed some and said they would let me join if I make a successful application, but it would the from the beginning as in 5 years and all that. I wouldn't be considered as a graduate applicant I guess. More on the lines of a "gap year student but not really".

    But my question was, can you just leave, or do you have to tell the uni when accepting the offer, I might leave at the end of next year if I get accepted somewhere else?

    Oh and thanks for the reply
    You should let the uni know you will be leaving after one year.
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    (Original post by ah639)
    I think it'd be a good idea to contact universities which you think you might apply to. Some of them might like to see your UCAS reference (or at least some sort of approval from academic staff) come from the university which you'd be studying Year 1 Biomedical Sciences at. This is because some universities don't want to be seen 'poaching' another university's students.

    It's more dignified to let your academic tutor know once you start Biomed that you'll be applying for medicine. Furthermore, you'd have to declare that you're studying an undergraduate course (Year 1) on your UCAS form, and a lot of medical schools won't like that. It doesn't really demonstrate any kind of commitment.

    Take a gap year and just reapply for medicine - that'd be my advice.
    Yeah but the problem with that is I can't really do a gap year because of where I'm from, because there's conscription for males, and if I have no uni degree to my name when I go for the checkup, I could be conscripted for a looong time.

    The biomed uni already know I applied to medicine because of my PS, but I agree that it would be more dignified to tell them, and I would like to do that (and will if I go) but are there any official procedures to it?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    You should let the uni know you will be leaving after one year.
    Ok, thanks for the help. :yy:
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    Yeah but the problem with that is I can't really do a gap year because of where I'm from, because there's conscription for males, and if I have no uni degree to my name when I go for the checkup, I could be conscripted for a looong time.

    The biomed uni already know I applied to medicine because of my PS, but I agree that it would be more dignified to tell them, and I would like to do that (and will if I go) but are there any official procedures to it?

    Thanks
    As far as I'm aware, each university will have its own formalised procedures for students who wish to withdraw from any course. It'd be best to tell them as soon as possible if and when you wish to leave, and note that this will have implications on any financial aid you may have signed up for (e.g. tuition/maintenance loans). A biomed degree (even if incomplete) would count as a 'first degree', so you may not be eligible for various types of financial aid in the future.
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    (Original post by ah639)
    As far as I'm aware, each university will have its own formalised procedures for students who wish to withdraw from any course. It'd be best to tell them as soon as possible if and when you wish to leave, and note that this will have implications on any financial aid you may have signed up for (e.g. tuition/maintenance loans). A biomed degree (even if incomplete) would count as a 'first degree', so you may not be eligible for various types of financial aid in the future.
    I did not know that at all. Thanks for the help, appreciate it, and I will tell them.
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    Hey which med schools are you applying next year?
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    I'm thinking of applying (again) for medicine for entry in 2017. I emailed a few unis asking if I could join a biomed course in the next academic year in the meantime, and if I get a place, I join them.

    They said sure ok, but you have to sort out the "process" with your chosen uni.

    What does this mean? Do I have to tell the biomed uni anything or can I just go at the end of the year and be like, I'm leaving??
    Hey which med schools are you applying next year
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    I did not know that at all. Thanks for the help, appreciate it, and I will tell them.
    As in which unis did u contact
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    I'm surprised you got such positive replies. If you look at this list there aren't many universities that said they would accept an application (though it does date back to 2014)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...fferent_Course

    I assume you're an international student? Perhaps that makes a difference. My daughter successfully applied to medicine whilst on the first year of a bio med course, but there were only a few unis that she could apply to (this was in 2012 so it's not worth giving the details as they will have changed by now)
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    (Original post by Mother2)
    I'm surprised you got such positive replies.
    I'm not surprised if the OP is an international student. Medical schools will always be much more positive about a (potentially) qualified international applicant than one with home/EU status. I can also envisage there being some sympathy about a student needing to study so as not be conscripted.

    Ultimately, the OP doesn't know whether or not he will be accepted into medical school and could well end up finishing the BSc and applying as a graduate.

    I don't think s/he necessarily has to be upfront on the medical school application about already being at university. S/he clearly isn't hiding the issue as it has been openly declared (and approved as an acceptable path) in advance of the application process. It would be unusual (but not unheard of) to use an historic referee (e.g. previous employer) if you didn't feel comfortable informing your current employer when applying for a new job. I don't see why this principle shouldn't persist for applications to university courses. Obviously if you are asked directly at any point then you should answer honestly and explain your reasons.

    I would usually counsel against starting a BSc with the plan of transferring into medical school. However, I can see how conscription might provide a reasonably compelling reason to start university, even if it's not your ideal choice of course. It's discourteous to begin a course while actively applying to another one (and actively forbidden with medical jobs, i.e. accepting one job while applying for others, as it exposes patients to risk of harm...) but it's hardly a major crime.

    Ultimately, if you are offered a medical school place, you will no longer be worried about what your former university thinks of you. If you are not offered a place, they don't necessarily need to know.

    PS. Keep copies of emails from medical schools that acknowledge you having informed them about your intended circumstances.
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    (Original post by shazza123)
    As in which unis did u contact
    I PM'd you a while back.

    (Original post by Mother2)
    I'm surprised you got such positive replies. If you look at this list there aren't many universities that said they would accept an application (though it does date back to 2014)
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...fferent_Course

    I assume you're an international student? Perhaps that makes a difference. My daughter successfully applied to medicine whilst on the first year of a bio med course, but there were only a few unis that she could apply to (this was in 2012 so it's not worth giving the details as they will have changed by now)
    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I'm not surprised if the OP is an international student. Medical schools will always be much more positive about a (potentially) qualified international applicant than one with home/EU status. I can also envisage there being some sympathy about a student needing to study so as not be conscripted.

    Ultimately, the OP doesn't know whether or not he will be accepted into medical school and could well end up finishing the BSc and applying as a graduate.

    I don't think s/he necessarily has to be upfront on the medical school application about already being at university. S/he clearly isn't hiding the issue as it has been openly declared (and approved as an acceptable path) in advance of the application process. It would be unusual (but not unheard of) to use an historic referee (e.g. previous employer) if you didn't feel comfortable informing your current employer when applying for a new job. I don't see why this principle shouldn't persist for applications to university courses. Obviously if you are asked directly at any point then you should answer honestly and explain your reasons.

    I would usually counsel against starting a BSc with the plan of transferring into medical school. However, I can see how conscription might provide a reasonably compelling reason to start university, even if it's not your ideal choice of course. It's discourteous to begin a course while actively applying to another one (and actively forbidden with medical jobs, i.e. accepting one job while applying for others, as it exposes patients to risk of harm...) but it's hardly a major crime.

    Ultimately, if you are offered a medical school place, you will no longer be worried about what your former university thinks of you. If you are not offered a place, they don't necessarily need to know.

    PS. Keep copies of emails from medical schools that acknowledge you having informed them about your intended circumstances.
    Sorry to both of you, I didn't get a notification you replied.

    I may have sugar-coated it a little (unintentionally) to get replies, but yeah, I got yes, but no as well. I'm still planning on emailing others though. (And still waiting on others like Glasgow)

    May I ask which unis your daughter applied to? or PM me? I understand if you don't want to say though.

    Thanks for you replies.

    MonteCristo; when you said you'd counsel against starting a BSc with the intentions of transferring into medicine, did you mean half-way through only, or do not encourage this path at all? i.e. finishing the course and applying as a graduate? And thanks for the advice.

    EDIT: oh yeah and I am an international student.
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    when you said you'd counsel against starting a BSc with the intentions of transferring into medicine, did you mean half-way through only, or do not encourage this path at all? i.e. finishing the course and applying as a graduate?
    In the typical scenario, the applicant doesn't get in to medical school at the first attempt and so accepts a BSc place with the intention of applying as a graduate.

    For me, there are two problems with this approach. First, graduate entry medicine is much more competitive, both in terms of applications/place ratios and the application arms race (graduates have had much more time and many more opportunities to accrue work experience, extracurricular activities, etc). Second, the graduate entry route takes 7 years, even if you are successful in your first year of applying as a graduate. You could apply for traditional courses and be unsuccessful twice (i.e. successful on third attempt) and still be finished in 7 years. I think that, for most people, being unsuccessful three times (i.e. 12 rejections by medical schools) should seriously consider alternative careers anyway.

    I would usually suggest that unsuccessful applicants take a gap year and then re-apply for traditional courses rather than automatically plan to take the graduate route. Exceptions might be if (1) there is an alternative career that they want to work towards in which case a BSc might be appropriate and they can decide later on whether or not to reapply to medical school or (2) if GCSE and/or A-level grades mean they will be unsuccessful applying for traditional courses and so need to take the BSc route. Mandatory conscription might be a third exception!

    DOI: graduate entry medic and broadly positive about the graduate entry route but not necessarily convinced that it's a great safety net for those that are unsuccessful in year 12/13.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    In the typical scenario, the applicant doesn't get in to medical school at the first attempt and so accepts a BSc place with the intention of applying as a graduate.

    For me, there are two problems with this approach. First, graduate entry medicine is much more competitive, both in terms of applications/place ratios and the application arms race (graduates have had much more time and many more opportunities to accrue work experience, extracurricular activities, etc). Second, the graduate entry route takes 7 years, even if you are successful in your first year of applying as a graduate. You could apply for traditional courses and be unsuccessful twice (i.e. successful on third attempt) and still be finished in 7 years. I think that, for most people, being unsuccessful three times (i.e. 12 rejections by medical schools) should seriously consider alternative careers anyway.

    I would usually suggest that unsuccessful applicants take a gap year and then re-apply for traditional courses rather than automatically plan to take the graduate route. Exceptions might be if (1) there is an alternative career that they want to work towards in which case a BSc might be appropriate and they can decide later on whether or not to reapply to medical school or (2) if GCSE and/or A-level grades mean they will be unsuccessful applying for traditional courses and so need to take the BSc route. Mandatory conscription might be a third exception!

    DOI: graduate entry medic and broadly positive about the graduate entry route but not necessarily convinced that it's a great safety net for those that are unsuccessful in year 12/13.
    I really appreciate the help thanks!

    Also, do you mind if I PM you to take your opinion on other routes if I need to? But yeah I agree with most of what you said, and I'm trying to mull it all over.
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    I transferred from Biochem, apply through UCAS and if you get an offer contact your uni, if the offer is at the same uni they'll probably let you transfer if you pass first year exams.

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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    I transferred from Biochem, apply through UCAS and if you get an offer contact your uni, if the offer is at the same uni they'll probably let you transfer if you pass first year exams.

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    Yeah but I don't think my biomed uni allow transfers. They mentioned they have a GEM course though.

    Did you email your biochem uni beforehand (as in before you actually entered) and tell them, I might leave after a year? Or did you just leave it until you either got an offer or not?

    Thanks for the reply
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    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    What does this mean? Do I have to tell the biomed uni anything or can I just go at the end of the year and be like, I'm leaving??
    (Original post by 1lastchance)
    I don't think the med unis would be willing for you to do one year studying a Biomed course and then leave.
    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    But my question was, can you just leave, or do you have to tell the uni when accepting the offer, I might leave at the end of next year if I get accepted somewhere else?
    Oh and thanks for the reply
    Weirdly, this is something that people can actually do, whether it's Biomed/Biochem etc. You need to let your Biomed uni know what you're doing and yes it does feel awkward telling them and it is a bit weird but you have to anyway. You also have to let your tutor know.

    If you get into Medicine, you'll have a place there and if you don't, you'll have to continue with Biomed (with the same lecturers/tutors you asked about leaving Biomed which is awkward af so I hope you get into Med).

    OP, are you considering Brighton & Sussex medical school as one of your options?
 
 
 
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