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    (Original post by jneill)
    MIght not be a bad idea.

    Attachment 511953

    Things that go down can go up.

    This is why investing is not an easy option.
    I'd say RDSB would be a good buy at the moment. The panic over the BG deal is now over and the dust is settling. There will be savings related to offloading un-needed assets and labour from BG,the oil price is nipping up again ,,its all good. As they say,,Never Sell Shell..
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    Believe me, with such small sums ,,dont get involved. You will lose your shirt big time.

    Making money on the stock market involves research, timing ,guts and most of all a good chunk of wonga. As an example this afternoon i placed a trade worth £18k and did the deal in the space of 1 minute.Job done. I wouldnt even think of doing any trade unless it involved at least 2 or 3 k.
    how much did you make limpopo?
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    Believe me, with such small sums ,,dont get involved. You will lose your shirt big time.

    Making money on the stock market involves research, timing ,guts and most of all a good chunk of wonga. As an example this afternoon i placed a trade worth £18k and did the deal in the space of 1 minute.Job done. I wouldnt even think of doing any trade unless it involved at least 2 or 3 k.
    Not enough capital for any kind of investment. Seems you do not have a socratic attitude, which is vital for any investor. You have to realise that you are poor, you have no skills that are worth of any value, esentially useless. A beginner traders salary is fee based, where other individuals with higher capital pay for investment advice.

    EDIT: Was meant for the dude who you replied to.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    how much did you make limpopo?
    This particular trade was not necessarily about making money though I'm expecting to make some. No,it was more about tax management. I have not sold the stock i bought on that deal. Im going to hang on to it for a while.
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    This particular trade was not necessarily about making money though I'm expecting to make some. No,it was more about tax management. I have not sold the stock i bought on that deal. Im going to hang on to it for a while.
    what do you mean it was about tax management? I don't understand that concept at all without further clarification. Do you mean it's about tax evasion, which is probably a criminal offence i hope you realise me? PM me if you don't want to answer this question in public??
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    (Original post by john2054)
    what do you mean it was about tax management? I don't understand that concept at all without further clarification. Do you mean it's about tax evasion, which is probably a criminal offence i hope you realise me? PM me if you don't want to answer this question in public??
    No,,its perfectly simple. I hold a massive wodge of stock in a particular company. Unfortunately it is held outside of an ISA wrapper. I am currently buying up tranches of the same stock within an ISA and i will, at some future point, dump the stock held outside the ISA which will fund the purchases and hopefully realise some profit also.
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    No,,its perfectly simple. I hold a massive wodge of stock in a particular company. Unfortunately it is held outside of an ISA wrapper. I am currently buying up tranches of the same stock within an ISA and i will, at some future point, dump the stock held outside the ISA which will fund the purchases and hopefully realise some profit also.
    Your last statement reveals both an ignorance of how isas and stock works, i afraid. ISAs are government backed savings schemes which allow you to save a certain amount each year, now I think £10'000 without it being taxed. Stock are equity in a companies assets, which are dependent on the markets for growth and drops, and are not 'wrapped by isas' as you put it.

    I actually think that you don't have any portfolio or sizable income so to speak, and enjoy coming on tsr to chat finances because it makes you feel powerful. Would I be right??
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Your last statement reveals both an ignorance of how isas and stock works, i afraid. ISAs are government backed savings schemes which allow you to save a certain amount each year, now I think £10'000 without it being taxed. Stock are equity in a companies assets, which are dependent on the markets for growth and drops, and are not 'wrapped by isas' as you put it.

    I actually think that you don't have any portfolio or sizable income so to speak, and enjoy coming on tsr to chat finances because it makes you feel powerful. Would I be right??
    I'm sorry you feel that way and have no real wish to debate my personal finances on a public forum.

    I will however say that it is you who is displaying your lack of knowledge with regard to ISAs as tax efficient vehicles and so perhaps you need to do some more reading.

    If you happen to be in the Greater Manchester area and you are free sometime next week, i will happily meet and discuss further on condition that you purchase for me one pint of real ale.

    I think it would be a good investment on your part as you could learn a lot and benefit greatly from my life experience.

    I shall also bring my lappy to dispel your concerns and suggestions that i am somehow grandstanding on this forum.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Your last statement reveals both an ignorance of how isas and stock works, i afraid. ISAs are government backed savings schemes which allow you to save a certain amount each year, now I think £10'000 without it being taxed. Stock are equity in a companies assets, which are dependent on the markets for growth and drops, and are not 'wrapped by isas' as you put it.
    No sure if you're trolling or truly that ignorant...
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    (Original post by Reue)
    No sure if you're trolling or truly that ignorant...
    leave me alone thanks
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    (Original post by Reue)
    You're accusing people of lying about their personal circumstances and spout a load of nonsense pretending it to be truth yourself..
    i possibly made a mistake about somebody who claimed to be buying stocks in an isa. but please enlighten me where i have been lying about myself. I am probably the most honest person you will ever meet!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    i possibly made a mistake about somebody who claimed to be buying stocks in an isa. but please enlighten me where i have been lying about myself. I am probably the most honest person you will ever meet!
    Not about yourself, but the information you're stating about ISAs is completely incorrect.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    You're accusing people of lying about their personal circumstances and spout a load of nonsense pretending it to be truth yourself..
    Both of these facts are wrong. As i said already, please leave me alone, thanks.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    ISAs are government backed savings schemes
    Wrong

    (Original post by john2054)
    Iwhich allow you to save a certain amount each year, now I think £10'000 without it being taxed.
    Wrong

    (Original post by john2054)
    Stock are equity in a companies assets, which are dependent on the markets for growth and drops, and are not 'wrapped by isas' as you put it.
    Wrong

    (Original post by john2054)
    Both of these facts are wrong. As i said already, please leave me alone, thanks.
    Please stop spreading incorrect information then.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Your last statement reveals both an ignorance of how isas and stock works, i afraid. ISAs are government backed savings schemes which allow you to save a certain amount each year, now I think £10'000 without it being taxed. Stock are equity in a companies assets, which are dependent on the markets for growth and drops, and are not 'wrapped by isas' as you put it.
    In case you've not looked it up yet, there's a form of ISA called a Stocks and Shares ISA that can be used to wrap portfolio holdings to reduce tax paid on dividends, interest and capital gains (where appropriate).
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    £500 is very little for trading given that a 10% yearly return would be considered good and you have outlay costs.


    Come back when you have 20k and know what you're doing.
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    With that amount of money, binary options trading would sound like your best bet. I am a student with the Academy of Financial Trading, there's another course starting next month there if you would be interested in learning more. Basically get a good idea of technical analysis and use a system such as IQ Option, I've seen people turn £1k into £23k in one day on that platform.
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    Believe me, with such small sums ,,dont get involved. You will lose your shirt big time.

    Making money on the stock market involves research, timing ,guts and most of all a good chunk of wonga. As an example this afternoon i placed a trade worth £18k and did the deal in the space of 1 minute.Job done. I wouldnt even think of doing any trade unless it involved at least 2 or 3 k.
    This is not too true for most brokers. Leverage considered and binary options trading for example mean even with a very small amount of capital trading can be conducted. For example I work sometimes conducting a £25-£50 trade every minute or two and after a day I can quite often turn £1k into 2 or 3. It's all about risk mitigation. Stop losses can also easily be used to make small value trades viable and reduce losses.
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    (Original post by will3482)
    This is not too true for most brokers. Leverage considered and binary options trading for example mean even with a very small amount of capital trading can be conducted. For example I work sometimes conducting a £25-£50 trade every minute or two and after a day I can quite often turn £1k into 2 or 3. It's all about risk mitigation. Stop losses can also easily be used to make small value trades viable and reduce losses.
    This isnt something im familiar with. Perhaps you could give us a brief explanation of how it works,,thanks.
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    This isnt something im familiar with. Perhaps you could give us a brief explanation of how it works,,thanks.
    Binary options trading is essentially speculating on whether you think the market will go up or down, (Call/Put) but the magnitude of how much it goes up or down is irrelevant. Certain brokers offer certain fixed profits at certain times. There is a lot more risk involved in each trade however as if you are incorrect the full value is lost rather than just the difference. But because these options can be taken out over a time of 1-15 minutes it really lends itself well to graphical technical analysis.

    Basically, if I invested £100 on the EUR/USD with a profit margin of 86% and I "Called" on it (speculating it will go up), and it does go up, I have £186 returned to me. However if it goes down, I lose all £100. Vice versa applies if I "Put" on it (speculating it will go down.

    The best performance I've seen so far, is a novice trader turning $12 into $2500 over the course of a month from only that $12 initial deposit.
 
 
 
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