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Would you report someone you saw cheating in exams? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you report someone you saw cheating in exams?
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    (Original post by MyNameWasTaken12)
    Yeah I bet they feel so cheated when they end up with a better grade and didn't have to work for it.
    But they did have to work for it, they had to devise a great cheating plan, plan exactly how they were going to carry it out (keeping in mind some of these plans involve things like writing on a piece of paper really small and rolling it up to about cigarette thickness and putting it facing outwards into a pen). Then they actually have to carry it out under pressure in the exam whilst constantly looking over their shoulder in case they get caught and get all their exams cancelled, that's a lot of work in my book

    Tbh I'd rather just sit down and learn my notes haha

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    If someone's happy with living a lie then each to their own. I cba to get into everyone's business unless its causing me/others harm...
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    I would want too... purely because in an exam the more people that cheat = higher UMS marks for them (just as an example) = higher grade... this would lead to a higher grade boundary for people that actually studied... could be the diference between getting that A* or A - A or B...
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    (Original post by DylanJ42)
    But they did have to work for it, they had to devise a great cheating plan, plan exactly how they were going to carry it out (keeping in mind some of these plans involve things like writing on a piece of paper really small and rolling it up to about cigarette thickness and putting it facing outwards into a pen). Then they actually have to carry it out under pressure in the exam whilst constantly looking over their shoulder in case they get caught and get all their exams cancelled, that's a lot of work in my book

    Tbh I'd rather just sit down and learn my notes haha

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    i just wrote on my hands.
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    (Original post by MyNameWasTaken12)
    Yeah I bet they feel so cheated when they end up with a better grade and didn't have to work for it.
    Yep.

    This 'they're only cheating themselves' notion is nonsense. They're cheating other people and making tangible gains from it.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    You could apply this to anything. You could apply it to burglary, fraud, and paid mob hits. Bernie Madoff defrauded investors out of billions of dollars, but, oh well, he's probably not very happy anyway, so I think we should just let it slide.
    No, cheating in exams is not the same as burglary or theft and you damn well know it.

    What a ridiculous comparison!

    So this person gets a better grade than they should have? Then what?

    You think they're going to have the skills necessary to proceed any higher than they are now? Not to mention in the workplace.

    Cheat an exam, and you'll look incompetent in anthing that qualification is towards.
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    No, cheating in exams is not the same as burglary or theft and you damn well know it.

    What a ridiculous comparison!

    So this person gets a better grade than they should have? Then what?

    You think they're going to have the skills necessary to proceed any higher than they are now? Not to mention in the workplace.

    Cheat an exam, and you'll look incompetent in anthing that qualification is towards.
    Read what I said. The argument that you made (oh well, they're probably not happy anyway, so the fact that they're gaining a dishonest benefit doesn't matter) applies in precisely the same way to the situations I gave. If you think it doesn't, explain why.

    Your last two paragraphs do not provide such an explanation. Even if the fact that it wouldn't be beneficial in the long run meant that it didn't matter, or was 'fair enough' or whatever people keep claiming, which I do not accept, what you've said will very often not apply. If you cheat in your French GCSE exams, and you don't carry on the subject at A level, what have you lost? If you cheat in your history A level exam, and this helps you make your offer to study English at university, what have you lost? If you cheat in degree level exams, and, like many people, end up doing work that is unrelated to your degree subject, what have you lost? The answer in all these cases is absolutely nothing. If you don't get caught, your cheating has worked out perfectly and helped you in the long run.
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    No, cheating in exams is not the same as burglary or theft and you damn well know it.

    What a ridiculous comparison!

    So this person gets a better grade than they should have? Then what?

    You think they're going to have the skills necessary to proceed any higher than they are now? Not to mention in the workplace.

    Cheat an exam, and you'll look incompetent in anthing that qualification is towards.
    Couple of things to point out:

    - Cheating on an exam to get a higher grade would be theft. If not of the grade itself, then of a uni place or job that someone who's really more qualified would've got, and of any grades of other students affected by the cheaters' unusally high marks.

    - Exams aren't a test of intelligence or grasp of a subject or skill. But besides, someone cheating doesn't have to be clueless, they could be someone who could get an A or maybe a B, but is cheating to get an A*, so will not suffer when they move to the next level of the subject.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Read what I said. The argument that you made (oh well, they're probably not happy anyway, so the fact that they're gaining a dishonest benefit doesn't matter) applies in precisely the same way to the situations I gave. If you think it doesn't, explain why.

    Your last two paragraphs do not provide such an explanation. Even if the fact that it wouldn't be beneficial in the long run meant that it didn't matter, or was 'fair enough' or whatever people keep claiming, which I do not accept, what you've said will very often not apply. If you cheat in your French GCSE exams, and you don't carry on the subject at A level, what have you lost? If you cheat in your history A level exam, and this helps you make your offer to study English at university, what have you lost? If you cheat in degree level exams, and, like many people, end up doing work that is unrelated to your degree subject, what have you lost? The answer in all these cases is absolutely nothing. If you don't get caught, your cheating has worked out perfectly and helped you in the long run.
    You have lost the opportunity to learn about that subject. You will have less knowledge about the subject, which will only bar you from accessing opportunities within that subject as easily in the future. You might cheat an exam, but when you're asked to produce the information that people expect you to know, you don't know it and become excluded from the interaction or opportunity or event. At the end of the day, I believe that cheating in an exam is just an extension of the education system's underlying message that, 'people should learn to be happy with extrinsic rewards like grades, rather than intrinsic rewards like knowledge to broaden the mind'.

    You're also assuming that I agree with cheating at all, which I don't. That's not what is being asked in the question. The question asks what would I do if I saw someone cheating, would I report them? No, because reporting someone for cheating doesn't tackle the issue of cheating.

    Have you taken a moment to think about why cheaters cheat? You can't really take the simplistic view that they do it because it's easier, surely? Maybe we should think about helping people who do cheat into a postion where they don't feel like they need to in order to pass exams.
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    Couple of things to point out:

    - Cheating on an exam to get a higher grade would be theft. If not of the grade itself, then of a uni place or job that someone who's really more qualified would've got, and of any grades of other students affected by the cheaters' unusally high marks.

    - Exams aren't a test of intelligence or grasp of a subject or skill. But besides, someone cheating doesn't have to be clueless, they could be someone who could get an A or maybe a B, but is cheating to get an A*, so will not suffer when they move to the next level of the subject.
    Who are you to decide what is and isn't theft? I didn't know we were all lawyers on TSR. You have to apply for a uni place or work opportunity and you are always asked to prove your qualifications in these instances.

    I never said that exams were a test of intelligence, nor did I say that they prove your overall grasp of a subject. If you're able to get an A or a B in a subject, there is no reason why you can't polish your work up to the standard of A*. That, I believe, is a question of effort, and potentially teacher quality.
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    I would definitely report them!
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    You have lost the opportunity to learn about that subject. You will have less knowledge about the subject, which will only bar you from accessing opportunities within that subject as easily in the future. You might cheat an exam, but when you're asked to produce the information that people expect you to know, you don't know it and become excluded from the interaction or opportunity or event. At the end of the day, I believe that cheating in an exam is just an extension of the education system's underlying message that, 'people should learn to be happy with extrinsic rewards like grades, rather than intrinsic rewards like knowledge to broaden the mind'.

    You're also assuming that I agree with cheating at all, which I don't. That's not what is being asked in the question. The question asks what would I do if I saw someone cheating, would I report them? No, because reporting someone for cheating doesn't tackle the issue of cheating.

    Have you taken a moment to think about why cheaters cheat? You can't really take the simplistic view that they do it because it's easier, surely? Maybe we should think about helping people who do cheat into a postion where they don't feel like they need to in order to pass exams.
    Not really. You've lost the opportunity in the same sense as the burglar has lost the opportunity to earn the money and buy things for himself -- you can still do it if you want, you just didn't have to do it right at that moment. As I explained, you very often do not need the actual knowledge you would have learned for the exam if you hadn't cheated for any other purpose, but, if you want to learn it, there's nothing stopping you.

    As for the last part, I'm quite happy to be sympathetic to people who are cheating or who might cheat -- after they've been caught and the appropriate penalty has been issued.
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    Who are you to decide what is and isn't theft? I didn't know we were all lawyers on TSR. You have to apply for a uni place or work opportunity and you are always asked to prove your qualifications in these instances.

    I never said that exams were a test of intelligence, nor did I say that they prove your overall grasp of a subject. If you're able to get an A or a B in a subject, there is no reason why you can't polish your work up to the standard of A*. That, I believe, is a question of effort, and potentially teacher quality.
    Erm... that was an oddly dramatic and kinda off-subject reply.

    I was going by the definition of theft... nothing to do with being a lawyer.

    You said exactly that was what exams were, otherwise you wouldn't have said there was a definite correlation...
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    Erm... that was an oddly dramatic and kinda off-subject reply.

    I was going by the definition of theft... nothing to do with being a lawyer.

    You said exactly that was what exams were, otherwise you wouldn't have said there was a definite correlation...
    My reply was perfectly on-subject actually. You're the one digressing...

    Theft is stealing, cheating is acting acting dishnoestly to gain unfair advantage.

    They are not the same, so don't try and apply theft to cheating.

    I don't even understand the last sentence, therefore I can't begin to understand where you were going with that...
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Not really. You've lost the opportunity in the same sense as the burglar has lost the opportunity to earn the money and buy things for himself -- you can still do it if you want, you just didn't have to do it right at that moment. As I explained, you very often do not need the actual knowledge you would have learned for the exam if you hadn't cheated for any other purpose, but, if you want to learn it, there's nothing stopping you.

    As for the last part, I'm quite happy to be sympathetic to people who are cheating or who might cheat -- after they've been caught and the appropriate penalty has been issued.
    I've explained my stance on this already. There's loads stopping you from learning about a subject when you're being spoonfed. You don't learn to be passionate about it, you become alienated from schools through boredom, and you can't find anything in education that you can apply to the wider world.

    All of these things can lead people to cheat, because they find no merit in the system. You have neither told me what the punishment should be (or stated that you know what the current punishments are), nor have you told me how you think punishments are effective at reducing cheating long-term.

    Things are not as black and white as you make them out to be, it requires more thought, empathy, and strategy to come up with a good plan to fight cheating in exams. Until then, I stick by my original response, because I hold no faith in the education system's ability to correct cheating in students effectively. They are much more likely to expel a student who cheats than take on the responsibility of reforming their behaviour through time and effort.
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    (Original post by JPO92)
    I've explained my stance on this already. There's loads stopping you from learning about a subject when you're being spoonfed. You don't learn to be passionate about it, you become alienated from schools through boredom, and you can't find anything in education that you can apply to the wider world.

    All of these things can lead people to cheat, because they find no merit in the system. You have neither told me what the punishment should be (or stated that you know what the current punishments are), nor have you told me how you think punishments are effective at reducing cheating long-term.

    Things are not as black and white as you make them out to be, it requires more thought, empathy, and strategy to come up with a good plan to fight cheating in exams. Until then, I stick by my original response, because I hold no faith in the education system's ability to correct cheating in students effectively. They are much more likely to expel a student who cheats than take on the responsibility of reforming their behaviour through time and effort.
    I don't care what merit an individual finds in the system and I don't care if they're bored. The solution to this is not to cheat the system.

    Frankly most of this is wildly off-topic waffle. You said that cheaters shouldn't be reported because they won't be happy anyway, and I dealt with that claim. As for the rest of this, I don't feel the need to address it further.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I don't care what merit an individual finds in the system and I don't care if they're bored. The solution to this is not to cheat the system.

    Frankly most of this is wildly off-topic waffle. You said that cheaters shouldn't be reported because they won't be happy anyway, and I dealt with that claim. As for the rest of this, I don't feel the need to address it further.
    You don't care? That's hilarious. Who was it who decided to pipe up at me because I didn't care about something you thought was important.

    One of the things I loathe above all else is an oblivious, ignorant hypocrite.
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    (Original post by wdkmwd)
    IKR. It's not like they're asking you for the answers.


    Only people who report cheaters are the people who were too stupid to get a high grade and are envious that people are a bit more resourceful than them in tight situations.

    Chances are a person who got a good grade on an exam wouldn't give a damn if they saw another person cheating, as far as they got the grade that they wanted.
    Tbh i think everyone should just focus on themselves and come prepared, if someone else wants to cheat then so be it for them
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    That's not like police at all. If a crime is taking place, you can't always expect a police officer just to happen to be in the same room, so he can find out about it without anyone else reporting it. Whereas if cheating is taking place, you can always expect invigilators to be in the same room; they're specifically stationed there so that they can detect it even without anyone else having to report it.

    So I don't see at as my duty to report cheating. I have better things to do (namely, my exam).
    It might not have anything to do with me, but it means that the person who cheated will get a better grade and then compete with me despite being incompetent. So it does have something to do with me. Plus as part of the society it is my duty as well to stop and ensure that the right people are positioned in the right places.
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    snakes everywhere pssssh
 
 
 
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