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    Okay, so I know that trying to study English Literature with no A-Levels in the subject is hopeless, so I can only apologise for the following sob story:

    I am a student with A*,A, B in Art, Geography, and Physics (poor me, right?). I have gained a place to study Architecture at university. I took the A-Levels I did in order to gain a place in Architecture. Why? Because I come from a family in which job security is the all-important factor in choosing to attend university. Apparently, to go for any other reason will only be detrimental to my career. I was told I could always continue my aspirations as a writer in my own time, and to put security before all else.
    Now listen, architecture is fine. Architecture is dandy. Architecture is something I wouldn't mind going to a museum for in order to discover more about it whilst on a city tour on holiday. But... and it has (clearly and stupidly) taken me a long time to admit this... it is NOT my real passion.

    I was always good at English in school; for that reason I guess I took it for granted. I began my A-Levels studying English simply for the sheer pleasure of it (I had assured my parents I would of course continue my promising path into the profitable fields of architecture *sigh*) but then I gave it up for another A-Level that I could get an easy A on without coursework building up.
    I didn't give English up cheaply, however. The reason I had no qualms about dropping it is that the department at my school was abysmal. The teachers weren't enthused, the most common teaching aid was a photocopied sheet (complete with standardized questions), and the subject was mainly taken by students who couldn't get into more specialised subjects. I thought I could honestly gain more from continuing my education by myself in my reading, my creative writing, and my going to literature-based events. Arrogant (trust me I know), but I was under stress at the time and students who took English even admitted it was poorly taught and offered practically no difference from their GCSE. To this day I only know one student who continued it at university. All of this gave me the (false) idea that I wasn't losing anything by dropping English.

    Fast forward to now; I want to study Literature. I've had enough arguments with my parents that stem from offhand remarks about loving the subject to make me outright state to them that I'd rather study something I am truly passionate about than study something of a lesser interest. I admitted that I actually took my current year out to work on a novel (cliché, sorry), and now I believe that the only way to get onto a path that I really want to follow is to study Literature.
    One problem; every university I look at says it won't accept students who didn't take an English A-Level.

    Look, I KNOW if I was really enthused I should have stuck with it at A-Level. I KNOW they probably won't accept me. I don't need another thread of people to tell me this. But the fact is, those facts DO NOT HELP ME.
    So please, can someone, anyone, advise me on my situation. I know it sounds like a million excuses from someone arrogant enough to feel they didn't need the qualification, but I'm in this predicament now. More than anything, I just want to learn. That's all.

    Thank you for any advice, and I'm sorry about the self-pitying novel it took to get here. I should thank you just for reading this if you do!
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    See if you can complete an A Level in English this year; you might start by looking online, at private colleges or distance learning institutions. If you can complete the A Level before the the next clearing cycle starts, you might be able to get a place for 2016 intake. If that's not possible, you will have to apply during next UCAS cycle, for 2017 intake.

    If you would like to try something different, look into an Access Humanities course. Access courses are the same level of study as A2 and usually take a year to complete. Every university accepts the Access qualification.
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    (Original post by AxelMcC)
    Okay, so I know that trying to study English Literature with no A-Levels in the subject is hopeless, so I can only apologise for the following sob story:

    I am a student with A*,A, B in Art, Geography, and Physics (poor me, right?). I have gained a place to study Architecture at university. I took the A-Levels I did in order to gain a place in Architecture. Why? Because I come from a family in which job security is the all-important factor in choosing to attend university. Apparently, to go for any other reason will only be detrimental to my career. I was told I could always continue my aspirations as a writer in my own time, and to put security before all else.
    Now listen, architecture is fine. Architecture is dandy. Architecture is something I wouldn't mind going to a museum for in order to discover more about it whilst on a city tour on holiday. But... and it has (clearly and stupidly) taken me a long time to admit this... it is NOT my real passion.

    I was always good at English in school; for that reason I guess I took it for granted. I began my A-Levels studying English simply for the sheer pleasure of it (I had assured my parents I would of course continue my promising path into the profitable fields of architecture *sigh*) but then I gave it up for another A-Level that I could get an easy A on without coursework building up.
    I didn't give English up cheaply, however. The reason I had no qualms about dropping it is that the department at my school was abysmal. The teachers weren't enthused, the most common teaching aid was a photocopied sheet (complete with standardized questions), and the subject was mainly taken by students who couldn't get into more specialised subjects. I thought I could honestly gain more from continuing my education by myself in my reading, my creative writing, and my going to literature-based events. Arrogant (trust me I know), but I was under stress at the time and students who took English even admitted it was poorly taught and offered practically no difference from their GCSE. To this day I only know one student who continued it at university. All of this gave me the (false) idea that I wasn't losing anything by dropping English.

    Fast forward to now; I want to study Literature. I've had enough arguments with my parents that stem from offhand remarks about loving the subject to make me outright state to them that I'd rather study something I am truly passionate about than study something of a lesser interest. I admitted that I actually took my current year out to work on a novel (cliché, sorry), and now I believe that the only way to get onto a path that I really want to follow is to study Literature.
    One problem; every university I look at says it won't accept students who didn't take an English A-Level.

    Look, I KNOW if I was really enthused I should have stuck with it at A-Level. I KNOW they probably won't accept me. I don't need another thread of people to tell me this. But the fact is, those facts DO NOT HELP ME.
    So please, can someone, anyone, advise me on my situation. I know it sounds like a million excuses from someone arrogant enough to feel they didn't need the qualification, but I'm in this predicament now. More than anything, I just want to learn. That's all.

    Thank you for any advice, and I'm sorry about the self-pitying novel it took to get here. I should thank you just for reading this if you do!
    Sorry to hear about your situation, but it's not all doom and gloom.

    Of course, you cannot do any sort of English degree without the A-levels in English Literature, English Language, the combined course, Creative Writing and Drama.

    My best bet is to perhaps just go to college and study the A-level English Literature. It will be much more cheaper than doing an online access course. Usually the course fees at college are around about £150-200 for a whole course. Where access courses online tend to be in their £300+ price range.

    Raise the money by getting a job. I REALLY advise you NOT to go to university and study Arch for one year then drop out. I say, do not go to university. Try and get a job, save money (it will only take first month of payment) to gain around £150-200 if you work a good part time job. If you can do that now-throughout the summer, you might be accepted to enroll on the Sept 2016 academic course at your local college. You've already got B in GCSE Maths and English so I'm sure they'll be able to fit you in. But do be aware, they might charge a lil extra for late admin fee. So I say get on the phone to them ASAP to find out their circumstances and procedures.

    Good luck!
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    Thanks for the advice, I'm happy to have some replies.

    I'll of course consider what both of you have said, but with regards to spending another year studying A-Level literature, I'm afraid that really might not be an option for me. I've already remained at home for this year which has pushed the walls of my sanity but apart from that it simply might not be practical. However I'm in no position to turn away from those suggestions completely.

    What are your thoughts with regards to Literature with a foundation year? I've seen some universities offer this and do you think it might make up for my lack of A-Level? Thanks again.
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    Doing a foundation year is one way for you to get onto a Literature BA, however, it would cost significantly more than the A Level and the Access course. I would only recommend you go down the foundation year route if you are absolutely desperate to start next year and have exhausted any and all attempts to cajole the university into letting you access the Literature BA somehow. I say somehow, because there may be a way for you to transfer from Architecture to Literature during or after your first year, thus allowing you to complete the Literature BA within 3 years rather than 4. It's certainly worth your effort to place pressure onto the university, by stating your quandary with ignited passion, and violins in the background!
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    (Original post by Андрей)
    Doing a foundation year is one way for you to get onto a Literature BA, however, it would cost significantly more than the A Level and the Access course. I would only recommend you go down the foundation year route if you are absolutely desperate to start next year and have exhausted any and all attempts to cajole the university into letting you access the Literature BA somehow. I say somehow, because there may be a way for you to transfer from Architecture to Literature during or after your first year, thus allowing you to complete the Literature BA within 3 years rather than 4. It's certainly worth your effort to place pressure onto the university, by stating your quandary with ignited passion, and violins in the background!
    Haha, thanks for that advice, that's probably the best way to approach it! I definitely won't be going down without a fight!
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    (Original post by AxelMcC)
    Thanks for the advice, I'm happy to have some replies.

    I'll of course consider what both of you have said, but with regards to spending another year studying A-Level literature, I'm afraid that really might not be an option for me. I've already remained at home for this year which has pushed the walls of my sanity but apart from that it simply might not be practical. However I'm in no position to turn away from those suggestions completely.

    What are your thoughts with regards to Literature with a foundation year? I've seen some universities offer this and do you think it might make up for my lack of A-Level? Thanks again.
    I can understand that you want you get out! But a foundation year is a waste of time - you'll be paying an extra 9 grand (once you graduate) just for a year. You could just do an A-level.

    However, what the other poster said could be credible but depending on the universities policies and procedures. I mean, I know a flatmate who was studying Architecture and he changed in the 2nd semester to Drama and Film. But some unis are way more flexible and if you went to a RG uni, I doubt they'd accept such a big difference of transferring from Architecture to English. For instance, a block mate had to change unis cause he wanted to study Film but he was studying Maths. So I don't know if it's worth paying an extra 9K!
 
 
 
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