Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    For GCSE's
    And also what websites/ books do you use?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I'm quite lazy so I usually watch videos on YouTube or attend school revision sessions(where there is nothing to do but work)

    GCSE Science (in particular, AQA) ;

    https://www.youtube.com/user/ChrisThorntonUK - This guy is good, very good
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there!

    I have a daily revision schedule that I follow and do 2.5+ hours a day after school. I usually write a lot of past papers from my boards.
    If your school has AQA science then kerboodle is a good website that also has the AQA science textbooks. Sometimes I find that BBC Bitesize is also quite useful. Also, I think workbooks are worth buying as you can practice in them and they usually contain answers to check in them.
    Btw what year are you in?

    Good luck!
    Offline

    2
    GCSE's. Get content heavy subjects done first - Lit, History, Geog and then focus on core subjects and then optional subjects. Maths for example, know the formulas and do past papers. Good luck!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I think the most important thing (especially with sciences and maths) is understanding, so because I understand the subjects I don't have to do much revision - I'll probably start sometime soon , just a few hours every night.
    But make sure before you start revising and drilling facts and all that into your head that you actually understand them - if you're ever unsure on something ask your teacher / YouTube it (there's always something useful on there) also read over what you've learnt after a day in school - that really helps!!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oblivion99)
    GCSE's. Get content heavy subjects done first - Lit, History, Geog
    This - I wish I revised for my GCSEs in this way.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by In2u)
    For GCSE's
    And also what websites/ books do you use?
    it'll depend on the person, there'll be the kind of person who works hard and revises every night to understand the stuff ad some who will understand the material right away thus not much need to revise
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm an A Level Student but I got all A's in the core subjects
    For both English Language and English Literature I made sure I got as many marks possible in the coursework, then for the English Language exam I used PQDs and made sure the development part was thorough and linked it back to the point as much as possible. For the English Literature exams, I read the texts as often as I could and looked at all the context in great deal, then in the exams made as many links as possible between points.
    Maths was partly self-taught, I was working at Cs for a year and a half then I did as many papers as I could and used cgp books and I got my A.
    Sciences; I sat core and additional (I was meant to do triple but opted out of it then deeply regretted it), my biology teachers and my teacher for c1 were brilliant so outside of lessons I made some revision posters to recap and did past papers. I had the same physics teacher for both core and additional, and whilst he was a great teacher his lessons were very 'mad' and we didn't learn that much, and my teacher for additional chemistry was absolutely shocking (he did no catchup sessions or anything, and I have him again now as one of my teachers for Chemistry AS thanks to my old teacher leaving at christmas) so physics and c2 was pretty much self taught, I printed off the specification and highlighted what I didn't know, plastered an entire wall in revision posters, did each past paper about 3 times over and cgp workbooks were incredibly helpful.
    Also, a technique that worked so well was to draw a pyramid, then draw lines on it so they were like blocks, then in each block I would write a topic from the spec, for example Ionic Bonding. Then I would make revision posters, answer questions from a workbook and do about 2 past paper questions on it and when I had conquered it, crossed it off and moved onto another topic.
    I started serious revision in the easter holidays, went to every catchup open to me and practically hammered teachers doors down if I was stuck with something, it was a lot of work but honestly it was worth it in the end.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BhavyaB)
    Hi there!

    I have a daily revision schedule that I follow and do 2.5+ hours a day after school. I usually write a lot of past papers from my boards.
    If your school has AQA science then kerboodle is a good website that also has the AQA science textbooks. Sometimes I find that BBC Bitesize is also quite useful. Also, I think workbooks are worth buying as you can practice in them and they usually contain answers to check in them.
    Btw what year are you in?

    Good luck!

    Thank You, I'm in year 11, having mock exams this week Which year are you in?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chaz W)
    This - I wish I revised for my GCSEs in this way.
    Thanks for sharing your experience
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oblivion99)
    GCSE's. Get content heavy subjects done first - Lit, History, Geog and then focus on core subjects and then optional subjects. Maths for example, know the formulas and do past papers. Good luck!
    Thank You!
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I did pretty well in GCSEs with mostly As, just make sure you read the books, CGP are good and know what you need to know and then do past papers.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by octopus21)
    I'm an A Level Student but I got all A's in the core subjects
    For both English Language and English Literature I made sure I got as many marks possible in the coursework, then for the English Language exam I used PQDs and made sure the development part was thorough and linked it back to the point as much as possible. For the English Literature exams, I read the texts as often as I could and looked at all the context in great deal, then in the exams made as many links as possible between points.
    Maths was partly self-taught, I was working at Cs for a year and a half then I did as many papers as I could and used cgp books and I got my A.
    Sciences; I sat core and additional (I was meant to do triple but opted out of it then deeply regretted it), my biology teachers and my teacher for c1 were brilliant so outside of lessons I made some revision posters to recap and did past papers. I had the same physics teacher for both core and additional, and whilst he was a great teacher his lessons were very 'mad' and we didn't learn that much, and my teacher for additional chemistry was absolutely shocking (he did no catchup sessions or anything, and I have him again now as one of my teachers for Chemistry AS thanks to my old teacher leaving at christmas) so physics and c2 was pretty much self taught, I printed off the specification and highlighted what I didn't know, plastered an entire wall in revision posters, did each past paper about 3 times over and cgp workbooks were incredibly helpful.
    Also, a technique that worked so well was to draw a pyramid, then draw lines on it so they were like blocks, then in each block I would write a topic from the spec, for example Ionic Bonding. Then I would make revision posters, answer questions from a workbook and do about 2 past paper questions on it and when I had conquered it, crossed it off and moved onto another topic.
    I started serious revision in the easter holidays, went to every catchup open to me and practically hammered teachers doors down if I was stuck with something, it was a lot of work but honestly it was worth it in the end.


    Thank You very much, I found it very helpful. It's sad that your teacher left. I had a lot of wonderful teachers since year 7, but sadly they had to leave at the end of year 10, because my school became an academy
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    pretty much all the time!
    as soon as i am back to home i have dinner and then 30 min of rest and then back to study time
    hour of study and 30 min break
    or some of them 1:30 of study and 30 min break
    i sleep at 2am
    but it depends how tired i am- if i feel tooooo sleepy then i go to bed at 12 the min
    if not so tired than 2 or 3am
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Mostly all the time but i do more during Weekends :P
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by In2u)
    Thank You, I'm in year 11, having mock exams this week Which year are you in?
    Hi! I'm in year 10
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Are unpaid trial work shifts fair?
    Useful resources

    Study tools

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Thinking about uni already?

    Thinking about uni already?

    See where you can apply with our uni match tool

    Student chat

    Ask a question

    Chat to other GCSE students and get your study questions answered.

    Creating

    Make study resources

    Create all the resources you need to get the grades.

    Planner

    Create your own Study Plan

    Organise all your homework and exams so you never miss another deadline.

    Resources by subject

    From flashcards to mind maps; there's everything you need for all of your GCSE subjects.

    Papers

    Find past papers

    100s of GCSE past papers for all your subjects at your fingertips.

    Help out other students

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.