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OCR FSMQ Additional Maths 6th June 2016 Official Thread watch

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    (Original post by Reesharr)
    Very difficult to say. There's been a growing trend at A-level towards questions involving greater degrees of problem-solving, and this may have filtered down to Add Maths. It's certainly a feature of the new maths GCSE - and even the old GCSE, viz the sweets problem last year.

    The techniques needed to complete the Add Maths paper were fairly standard. What changed was the way in which questions were posed eg, the roof question only involved 3 linked right-angled triangles but visualising the problem in the first place was quite difficult. The same could be said of the buns/loaves problem.

    What is unclear is the degree to which Add Maths examinees across the country are being taught to problem-solve. If the number is small then the grade boundaries are likely to drop significantly; if it is large, then they won't.

    Despite periodic complaints from my A-level students I feed them a varied diet of problems across all Boards which they say "...are more difficult than questions that have appeared on past papers." But it does develop resilience in the face of unexpected questions. It also prepares students for the sort of questions you may be asked at Russell Group unis et al. So I put up with the complaints! ;-)

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    Fair enough, well it'll be interesting to see what OCR decide. - if only my maths teacher had such forethinking as you, O Holy Reesharr (thank you for contributions to the thread :adore:)
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    do you think i will get an A with 60 marks.
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    I reckon I got around 75-79 is that possibly an A
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    (Original post by trollface54)
    I reckon I got around 75-79 is that possibly an A
    strong username to post content ratio

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    (Original post by trollface54)
    I reckon I got around 75-79 is that possibly an A
    yep that'll definitely be an A.
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    do I need an A or B in add maths to do further maths at A level.
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    To do further maths you only need an A* in gcse maths
    Additional maths only increases the possibility of being able to study it due to competition of spaces
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    (Original post by akshitnashine)
    do I need an A or B in add maths to do further maths at A level.
    (Original post by trollface54)
    To do further maths you only need an A* in gcse maths
    Additional maths only increases the possibility of being able to study it due to competition of spaces
    This completely depends on your school/sixth form. For example, at my sixth form college, there is no 'competition of spaces' and anyone can study Further Maths as long as they got either an A* or an A in GCSE maths.
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    (Original post by akshitnashine)
    do I need an A or B in add maths to do further maths at A level.
    Unlikely - but obviously it depends on your school. Add Maths and Further Maths are very different in their content. The former is really a taster of AS single maths - a mix of parts of C1, C2, M1 and D1. The latter is the fun stuff - imaginary/complex numbers, loci, matrices and various forms of proof. The only potential downside is that you also have to take an additional applied subject for each year of study.

    Where I taught last year, 2/3 of the 250 Y12s took A-level maths of whom around 60 also did Further Maths. Doing FM typically raises your single maths results by one to two grades simply because it makes you more rigorous/structured in the way you answer questions and develops your understanding of maths.
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    (Original post by Vanilla Cupcak)
    strong username to post content ratio

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    What you getting at?
    Don't get cheeky nandos with me
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    6th June 2016 - OCR FSMQ Additional Maths Exam
    I hope that this thread will be helpful for anybody who's taking Additional Maths this year. I've posted up some resources, but feel free to message me about any other resources I could include, as well as using this thread to help each other on different topics in Additional Maths.

    Specification:
    http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/76669-specification.pdf

    Past Papers:
    http://www.mei.org.uk/ampapers

    Useful Videos:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...o8sPogVlyBP6yD (He goes through all of the past paper questions)

    Other Resources:
    http://integralmaths.org/course/view.php?id=67

    If you need help with any topics, don't hesitate to post any questions here, and hopefully someone on this thread will be able to help you!

    Unofficial Mark Scheme
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6msukvtn5...4t5QJpRea?dl=0



    (Thanks to Reesharr for the mark scheme)
    Anyone feel hard of this year ocr additional maths exam
    ?
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    (Original post by lillyroselove)
    I am so glad someone else found this exam so difficult omg it was horrific

    I found it really hard too. I got more than 95% of all the past paper but I dont have any confidence to get 80
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    (Original post by lillyroselove)
    I am so glad someone else found this exam so difficult omg it was horrific
    It was really hard.
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    (Original post by Reesharr)
    Very difficult to say. There's been a growing trend at A-level towards questions involving greater degrees of problem-solving, and this may have filtered down to Add Maths. It's certainly a feature of the new maths GCSE - and even the old GCSE, viz the sweets problem last year.

    The techniques needed to complete the Add Maths paper were fairly standard. What changed was the way in which questions were posed eg, the roof question only involved 3 linked right-angled triangles but visualising the problem in the first place was quite difficult. The same could be said of the buns/loaves problem.

    What is unclear is the degree to which Add Maths examinees across the country are being taught to problem-solve. If the number is small then the grade boundaries are likely to drop significantly; if it is large, then they won't.

    Despite periodic complaints from my A-level students I feed them a varied diet of problems across all Boards which they say "...are more difficult than questions that have appeared on past papers." But it does develop resilience in the face of unexpected questions. It also prepares students for the sort of questions you may be asked at Russell Group unis et al. So I put up with the complaints! ;-)

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    do u think the c1 and c2 papers in next year will have a large number of problem solving questions?
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    I am really worry about that the as exam next year will have the problem solving, modelling and reasoning questions. It is not fair, they suppose appear on the new a level. How can we answer these kind of questions, we cant find any of these questions in my textbook!
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    (Original post by manonlavaughn)
    do u think the c1 and c2 papers in next year will have a large number of problem solving questions?
    Let me ask you a question: How many times are you planning to sit C1 and C2?

    Because if it's only once then there is no answer to your question.

    If I throw a fair coin 20 times and get 20 heads, what's the likelihood that the next throw will be a tail? Answer: Still 0.5.

    Luckily in exams there is a high degree of certainty about the questions that will be asked and even how they will be asked. Humans generate the questions and they are creatures of habit so the choice of questions on papers are far from random - they have low entropy ( https://goo.gl/OAHwRz ). That's why students complain when an exam paper doesn't quite fit the past "pattern", last week's Add Maths paper being an example.

    I would almost say that entropy for most papers in the past has been close to zero but with the occasional perturbation. That perturbation could arise from political criticism of an exam board for being too predictable. So it puts some "more difficult" questions into its next lot of exam papers.

    A perfect example was the Edexcel C3 paper from June 2013. I remember students came out of that exam in tears. In my naivety while invigilating the exam I had thought "That's a nice set of questions," not realising that students would have difficulty interpreting the questions (I hadn't at that point actually taught A-level - long story not for now). The grade boundaries dropped dramatically from around 68 out of 75 for an A* to 57/75.

    Rather than try and predict the likelihood of certain types of questions appearing (and I'm sure you know maths teachers who do probability analysis to an extreme degree), you should focus on developing a desire to tackle more difficult unusual problems. Not because they are more likely to appear on papers, but because that builds resilience and confidence in the exam room.

    Julie Andrews (yes, she of The Sound Of Music) was once asked, with all her experience, what was the most important message she had given her children. Unexpectedly she said "Be curious." And she's absolutely right. If you don't have curiousity - an interest in - the subject you are studying at A-level, then you are less likely to do well at it, and that is particularly true of mathematics.

    When sports men and women train for the Olympics, they don't simply do the same basic circuit in the same way day after day. They push themselves and try and do better each day. That's what you have to do to excel in anything, not just sport.

    Anyway... One final question: Did you follow that link on entropy to find out what it was about? If you did, and if you watched the video, you were exhibiting curiosity.
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    So you can't get the A1 marks after you made the error? You can only get the M1 marks?
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    (Original post by manonlavaughn)
    It was really hard.
    It's worth thinking about what made the questions hard and what you might have done in the exam to tackle that difficulty. Because the underlying maths in every single question was well within the scope of what is taught as part of the Add Maths syllabus.

    My guess - but you tell me - is that you were thrown by how some questions were phrased. Once you interpreted/understood the question the rest should have been relatively easy.

    For Q.7 for example, do you know how to use Pythagoras? Do you know that a right-angled triangle with the other two angles 45° is isosceles? Do you know how to find the inverse tan? You only had to apply those three bits of knowledge individually to three linked triangles. That was it!

    For Q.13, if I tell you that 12 oranges cost £3.60 and that I would get 3 fewer apples for the same price, can you work out the price of an orange and an apple? Essentially you only had to do the same thing for that question but using algebra.

    My experience with students is that many a) don't read through the paper completely before starting and mark up the questions they can do easily and then work on those first, b) rush into problems without contemplating first the best way of answering them by letting their minds relax, and c) get stuck on problems and find it difficult to move on, thus losing time that would have been better spent on questions they could answer. You need to build confidence in an exam so why destroy it by doing hard problems too early? Just ignore them and focus on stuff you find relatively easier!

    All this is exam technique. And the great thing about this Add Maths paper (if we can call it "great" ) is that it may have raised an awareness in you guys of the need to develop good exam technique. Although your Add Maths result seems like a big thing now, it's not really. It's a dress rehearsal for doing A-level, so if you've learnt something from this paper then you can apply that learning to doing really well when/if you move on to A-level maths.

    Real life is full of hard knocks. The art of coping or being successful is to pick yourself up afterwards, learn from what has happened and do better next time. Keep positive!
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    (Original post by ursulab)
    So you can't get the A1 marks after you made the error? You can only get the M1 marks?
    Correct.

    "A" stands for accuracy, so if you haven't got the right answer it isn't accurate. Hence why we have "M" marks so that you can still get marks if you use the right method but slip up in applying that method.
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    (Original post by Reesharr)
    It's worth thinking about what made the questions hard and what you might have done in the exam to tackle that difficulty. Because the underlying maths in every single question was well within the scope of what is taught as part of the Add Maths syllabus.

    My guess - but you tell me - is that you were thrown by how some questions were phrased. Once you interpreted/understood the question the rest should have been relatively easy.

    For Q.7 for example, do you know how to use Pythagoras? Do you know that a right-angled triangle with the other two angles 45° is isosceles? Do you know how to find the inverse tan? You only had to apply those three bits of knowledge individually to three linked triangles. That was it!

    For Q.13, if I tell you that 12 oranges cost £3.60 and that I would get 3 fewer apples for the same price, can you work out the price of an orange and an apple? Essentially you only had to do the same thing for that question but using algebra.

    My experience with students is that many a) don't read through the paper completely before starting and mark up the questions they can do easily and then work on those first, b) rush into problems without contemplating first the best way of answering them by letting their minds relax, and c) get stuck on problems and find it difficult to move on, thus losing time that would have been better spent on questions they could answer. You need to build confidence in an exam so why destroy it by doing hard problems too early? Just ignore them and focus on stuff you find relatively easier!

    All this is exam technique. And the great thing about this Add Maths paper (if we can call it "great" ) is that it may have raised an awareness in you guys of the need to develop good exam technique. Although your Add Maths result seems like a big thing now, it's not really. It's a dress rehearsal for doing A-level, so if you've learnt something from this paper then you can apply that learning to doing really well when/if you move on to A-level maths.

    Real life is full of hard knocks. The art of coping or being successful is to pick yourself up afterwards, learn from what has happened and do better next time. Keep positive!
    Thanks, yes you are right.
 
 
 
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